« Back | Print 
Concordia.ca   /   Library   /   About the library   /   News   /   Acquisitions

New books by subject

sort items by: 
 RSS

Philosophy, Aesthetics, Ethics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range B - BD (Philosophy) and BH - BJ (Aesthetics, Ethics) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Total collapse : the case against responsibility and morality / Stephen Kershnar
    BJ1521

  • Knowledge and power in the philosophies of Ḥamīd al-Dīn Kirmānī and Mullā Ṣadrā Shīrāzī / Sayeh Meisami
    BD438

    This book is a comparative study of two major Shīʿī thinkers Ḥamīd al-Dīn Kirmānī from the Fatimid Egypt and Mullā Ṣadrā from the Safavid Iran, demonstrating the mutual empowerment of discourses on knowledge formation and religio-political authority in certain Ismaʿili and Twelver contexts. The book investigates concepts, narratives, and arguments that have contributed to the generation and development of the discourse on the absolute authority of the imam and his representatives. To demonstrate this, key passages from primary texts in Arabic and Persian are translated and closely analyzed to highlight the synthesis of philosophical, Sufi, theological, and scriptural discourses. The book also discusses the discursive influence of Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī as a key to the transmission of Ismaʿili narratives of knowledge and authority to later Shīʿī philosophy and its continuation to modern and contemporary times particularly in the narrative of the guardianship of the jurist in the Islamic Republic of Iran.


  • Structures and Algorithms Mathematics and the Nature of Knowledge / by Jens Erik Fenstad
    BD143

  • Advancements in the Philosophy of Design edited by Pieter E. Vermaas, Stéphane Vial
    B53

  • Kierkegaard, MacIntyre, Williams, and the internal point of view / Rob Compaijen
    B4378.E8

  • Thomas Hobbes's conception of peace : civil society and international order / Maximilian Jaede
    B1247

  • Why am I jealous?
    BJ 1535 J4 G5514 2016

    In Why Am I Jealous? , Hugo feels left out when his friends start playing with other children. He feels angry and sad, could he be feeling jealous? What is jealousy? This book explores the effect of jealousy, the situations in which it arises and encourages children to think about what jealousy is and ways to stop feeling left out. Children will recognise the characters from the Cbeebies series, What's The Big Idea'.

    The book is part of a series which introduces young children aged 4+ to philosophy by exploring different emotions and ideas through a variety of amusing and familiar situations. Each book aims to promote thinking skills in its readers developing their questioning of the world around them and encouraging them to make up their own minds. The books include discussion notes for parents or educators.


  • On Descartes' passive thought : the myth of Cartesian dualism / Jean-Luc Marion ; translated by Christina M. Gschwandtner
    B 1875 M336613 2018
    On Descartes' Passive Thought is the culmination of a life-long reflection on the philosophy of Descartes by one of the most important living French philosophers. In it, Jean-Luc Marion examines anew some of the questions left unresolved in his previous books about Descartes, with a particular focus on Descartes's theory of morals and the passions.

    Descartes has long been associated with mind-body dualism, but Marion argues here that this is a historical misattribution, popularized by Malebranche and popular ever since both within the academy and with the general public. Actually, Marion shows, Descartes held a holistic conception of body and mind . He called it the meum corpus, a passive mode of thinking, which implies far more than just pure mind--rather, it signifies a mind directly connected to the body: the human being that I am. Understood in this new light, the Descartes Marion uncovers through close readings of works such as Passions of the Soul resists prominent criticisms leveled at him by twentieth-century figures like Husserl and Heidegger, and even anticipates the non-dualistic, phenomenological concepts of human being discussed today. This is a momentous book that no serious historian of philosophy will be able to ignore.

  • Emancipatory thinking : Simone de Beauvoir and contemporary political thought / Elaine Stavro
    B 2430 B344 S73 2018
    Most scholars have focused on The Second Sex and Simone de Beauvoir's fiction, concentrating on gender issues but ignoring her broader emancipatory vision. Though Beauvoir's political thinking is not as closely studied as her feminist works, it underpinned her activism and helped her navigate the dilemmas raised by revolutionary thought in the postwar period. In Emancipatory Thinking Elaine Stavro brings together Beauvoir's philosophy and her political interventions to produce complex ideas on emancipation. Drawing from a range of work, including novels, essays, autobiographical writings, and philosophic texts, Stavro explains that for Beauvoir freedom is a movement that requires both personal and collective transformation. Freedom is not guaranteed by world historical systems, material structures, wilful action, or discursive practices, but requires engaged subjects who are able to take creative risks as well as synchronize with existing forces to work towards collective change. Beauvoir, Stavro asserts, resisted the trend of anti-humanism that has dominated French thinking since the 1960s and also managed to avoid the pitfalls of voluntarism and individualism. In fact, Stavro argues, Beauvoir appreciated the impact of material, socio-economic, institutional forces, without forgoing the capacity to initiate. Applying Beauvoir's existential insights and understanding of embodied and situated subjectivity to recent debates within gender, literary, sociological, cultural, and political studies, Emancipatory Thinking provides a lens to explore the current political and theoretical landscape.

  • Art of the ordinary : the everyday domain of art, film, philosophy, and poetry / Richard Deming
    BH 39 D4433 2018

    Cutting across literature, film, art, and philosophy, Art of the Ordinary is a trailblazing, cross-disciplinary engagement with the ordinary and the everyday. Because, writes Richard Deming, the ordinary is always at hand, it is, in fact, too familiar for us to perceive it and become fully aware of it. The ordinary he argues, is what most needs to be discovered and yet is something that can never be approached, since to do so is to immediately change it.

    Art of the Ordinary explores how philosophical questions can be revealed in surprising places--as in a stand-up comic's routine, for instance, or a Brillo box, or a Hollywood movie. From negotiations with the primary materials of culture and community, ways of reading "self" and "other" are made available, deepening one's ability to respond to ethical, social, and political dilemmas. Deming picks out key figures, such as the philosophers Stanley Cavell, Arthur Danto, and Richard Wollheim; poet John Ashbery; artist Andy Warhol; and comedian Steven Wright, to showcase the foundational concepts of language, ethics, and society. Deming interrogates how acts of the imagination by these people, and others, become the means for transforming the alienated ordinary into a presence of the everyday that constantly and continually creates opportunities of investment in its calls on interpretive faculties.

    In Art of the Ordinary , Deming brings together the arts, philosophy, and psychology in new and compelling ways so as to offer generative, provocative insights into how we think and represent the world to others as well as to ourselves.


  • From bacteria to Bach and back : the evolution of minds / Daniel C. Dennett
    B 105 C477 D445 2017
    How did we come to have minds?

    For centuries, this question has intrigued psychologists, physicists, poets, and philosophers, who have wondered how the human mind developed its unrivaled ability to create, imagine, and explain. Disciples of Darwin have long aspired to explain how consciousness, language, and culture could have appeared through natural selection, blazing promising trails that tend, however, to end in confusion and controversy. Even though our understanding of the inner workings of proteins, neurons, and DNA is deeper than ever before, the matter of how our minds came to be has largely remained a mystery.

    That is now changing, says Daniel C. Dennett. In From Bacteria to Bach and Back, his most comprehensive exploration of evolutionary thinking yet, he builds on ideas from computer science and biology to show how a comprehending mind could in fact have arisen from a mindless process of natural selection. Part philosophical whodunit, part bold scientific conjecture, this landmark work enlarges themes that have sustained Dennett's legendary career at the forefront of philosophical thought.

    In his inimitable style--laced with wit and arresting thought experiments--Dennett explains that a crucial shift occurred when humans developed the ability to share memes, or ways of doing things not based in genetic instinct. Language, itself composed of memes, turbocharged this interplay. Competition among memes--a form of natural selection--produced thinking tools so well-designed that they gave us the power to design our own memes. The result, a mind that not only perceives and controls but can create and comprehend, was thus largely shaped by the process of cultural evolution.

    An agenda-setting book for a new generation of philosophers, scientists, and thinkers, From Bacteria to Bach and Back will delight and entertain anyone eager to make sense of how the mind works and how it came about.


  • Why am I angry?
    BJ 1535 A6 M8714 2016

    The monkey is wreaking havoc making Hugo and his friend very angry. But what is anger? This book explores the effect of anger, the situations in which it arises and encourages children to think about what anger is and learn how to deal with it. Children will recognise the characters from the Cbeebies series, What's The Big Idea'.

    The book is part of a series which introduces young children aged 4+ to philosophy by exploring different emotions and ideas through a variety of amusing and familiar situations. Each book aims to promote thinking skills in its readers developing their questioning of the world around them and encouraging them to make up their own minds. The books include discussion notes for parents or educators.


  • Religion : material dynamics / David Chidester
    B 825 C45 2018
    Religion: Material Dynamics is a lively resource for thinking about religious materiality and the material study of religion. Deconstructing and reconstructing religion as material categories, social formations, and mobile circulations, the book explores the making, ordering, and circulating of religious things. The book is divided into three sections: Part One revitalizes basic categories--animism and sacred, space and time--by situating them in their material production and testing their analytical viability. Part Two examines religious formations as configurations of power that operate in material cultures and cultural economies and are most clearly shown in the power relations of colonialism and imperialism. Part Three explores the material dynamics of circulation through case studies of religious mobility, change, and diffusion as intimate as the body and as vast as the oceans. Each chapter offers insightful orientations and surprising possibilities for studying material religion. Exploring the material dynamics of religion from poetics to politics, David Chidester provides an entry into the study of material religion that will be welcomed by students and specialists in religious studies, anthropology, and history.

  • Moses Mendelssohn's Hebrew writings / translated by Edward Breuer ; introduced and annotated by Edward Breuer and David Sorkin
    B 2690 E5 B74 2018
    German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was one of the most influential thinkers of the Enlightenment. Until now, attention was focused on Mendelssohn's German works--such as his groundbreaking Jerusalem-- which have been duly translated into English. Edward Breuer and David Sorkin assert that his Hebrew works are essential for understanding both his biography and his oeuvre. This volume offers expertly translated and generously annotated selections from the entire corpus of Mendelssohn's published Hebrew writings.

    Mendelssohn wrote in Hebrew throughout his life, but these works--mainly grounded in biblical and other Hebrew classical works--have been hitherto inaccessible to most scholars. In this volume, Breuer and Sorkin make an important contribution to modern Jewish and religious thought, refuting the notion that Mendelssohn led a bifurcated intellectual and spiritual existence and demonstrating Mendelssohn's ability to transform traditional religious genres into vehicles for philosophical argumentation.

  • Marx's dream : from capitalism to communism / Tom Rockmore
    B 3305 M74 R573 2018
    Two centuries after his birth, Karl Marx is read almost solely through the lens of Marxism, his works examined for how they fit into the doctrine that was developed from them after his death.

    With Marx's Dream , Tom Rockmore offers a much-needed alternative view, distinguishing rigorously between Marx and Marxism. Rockmore breaks with the Marxist view of Marx in three key ways. First, he shows that the concern with the relation of theory to practice--reflected in Marx's famous claim that philosophers only interpret the world, while the point is to change it--arose as early as Socrates, and has been central to philosophy in its best moments. Second, he seeks to free Marx from his unsolicited Marxist embrace in order to consider his theory on its own merits. And, crucially, Rockmore relies on the normal standards of philosophical debate, without the special pleading to which Marxist accounts too often resort. Marx's failures as a thinker, Rockmore shows, lie less in his diagnosis of industrial capitalism's problems than in the suggested remedies, which are often unsound.

    Only a philosopher of Rockmore's stature could tackle a project this substantial, and the results are remarkable: a fresh Marx, unencumbered by doctrine and full of insights that remain salient today.

  • The aesthetics of meaning and thought : the bodily roots of philosophy, science, morality, and art / Mark Johnson
    BH 39 J63 2018
    All too often, we think of our minds and bodies separately. The reality couldn't be more different: the fundamental fact about our mind is that it is embodied. We have a deep visceral, emotional, and qualitative relationship to the world--and any scientifically and philosophically satisfactory view of the mind must take into account the ways that cognition, meaning, language, action, and values are grounded in and shaped by that embodiment.

    This book gathers the best of philosopher Mark Johnson's essays addressing questions of our embodiment as they deal with aesthetics--which, he argues, we need to rethink so that it takes into account the central role of body-based meaning. Viewed that way, the arts can give us profound insights into the processes of meaning making that underlie our conceptual systems and cultural practices. Johnson shows how our embodiment shapes our philosophy, science, morality, and art; what emerges is a view of humans as aesthetic, meaning-making creatures who draw on their deepest physical processes to make sense of the world around them.

  • Descartes' Meditations on first philosophy : an Edinburgh philosophical guide / Kurt Brandhorst
    B 1854 B73 2010
    Descartes' Meditations is one of the first texts that a philosophy student will study, and one that many come back to time and again. Rather than simply telling the reader what to think, Meditations invites us to take a philosophical journey. This book prepares readers for that journey, helping them to engage with each of the meditations and suggesting ways through the more difficult passages. This guide also offers students a fresh approach by bringing to life the path of self-discovery encapsulated in the work, while maintaining the emphasis on metaphysics. By focusing on what the text itself has to say, rather than what has been said about it by others, it will help readers at all levels to discover - or rediscover - why Descartes' Meditations is one of the cornerstones of philosophy.

  • Serious larks : the philosophy of Ted Cohen / edited and with an introduction by Daniel Herwitz
    B 945 C641 H47 2018
    Ted Cohen was an original and captivating essayist known for his inquisitive intelligence, wit, charm, and a deeply humane feel for life. For Cohen, writing was a way of discovering, and also celebrating, the depth and complexity of things overlooked by most professional philosophers and aestheticians--but not by most people. Whether writing about the rules of baseball, of driving, or of Kant's Third Critique; about Hitchcock, ceramics, or jokes, Cohen proved that if you study the world with a bemused but honest attentiveness, you can find something to philosophize about more or less anywhere.

    ​This collection, edited and introduced by philosopher Daniel Herwitz, brings together some of Cohen's best work to capture the unique style that made Cohen one of the most beloved philosophers of his generation. Among the perceptive, engaging, and laugh-out-loud funny reflections on movies, sports, art, language, and life included here are Cohen's classic papers on metaphor and his Pushcart Prize-winning essay on baseball, as well as memoir, fiction, and even poetry. Full of free-spirited inventiveness, these Serious Larks would be equally at home outside Thoreau's cabin on the waters of Walden Pond as they are here, proving that intelligence, sensitivity, and good humor can be found in philosophical writing after all.

  • The birth of sense : generative passivity in Merleau-Ponty's philosophy / Don Beith
    B 2430 M3764 B45 2018

    In The Birth of Sense, Don Beith proposes a new concept of generative passivity, the idea that our organic, psychological, and social activities take time to develop into sense. More than being a limit, passivity marks out the way in which organisms, persons, and interbodily systems take time in order to manifest a coherent sense. Beith situates his argument within contemporary debates about evolution, developmental biology, scientific causal explanations, psychology, postmodernism, social constructivism, and critical race theory. Drawing on empirical studies and phenomenological reflections, Beith argues that in nature, novel meaning emerges prior to any type of constituting activity or deterministic plan.



    The Birth of Sense is an original phenomenological investigation in the style of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and it demonstrates that the French philosopher's works cohere around the notion that life is radically expressive. While Merleau-Ponty's early works are widely interpreted as arguing for the primacy of human consciousness, Beith argues that a pivotal redefinition of passivity is already under way here, and extends throughout Merleau-Ponty's corpus. This work introduces new concepts in contemporary philosophy to interrogate how organic development involves spontaneous expression, how personhood emerges from this bodily growth, and how our interpersonal human life remains rooted in, and often thwarted by, domains of bodily expressivity.


  • Against dharma : dissent in the ancient Indian sciences of sex and politics / Wendy Doniger
    B 132 D5 D66 2018
    An esteemed scholar of Hinduism presents a groundbreaking interpretation of ancient Indian texts and their historic influence on subversive resistance

    Ancient Hindu texts speak of the three aims of human life: dharma , artha , and kama . Translated, these might be called religion, politics, and pleasure, and each is held to be an essential requirement of a full life. Balance among the three is a goal not always met, however, and dharma has historically taken precedence over the other two qualities in Hindu life. Here, historian of religions Wendy Doniger offers a spirited and close reading of ancient Indian writings, unpacking a long but unrecognized history of opposition against dharma .

    Doniger argues that scientific disciplines ( shastras ) have offered lively and continuous criticism of dharma, or religion, over many centuries. She chronicles the tradition of veiled subversion, uncovers connections to key moments of resistance and voices of dissent throughout Indian history, and offers insights into the Indian theocracy's subversion of science by religion today.

  • From natural character to moral virtue in Aristotle / Mariska Leunissen
    B 491 V57 L48 2017
    From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle discusses Aristotle's biological views about character and the importance of what he calls "natural character traits" for the development of moral virtue as presented in his ethical treatises. The aim is to provide a new, comprehensiveaccount of the physiological underpinnings of moral development and thereby to show, first, that Aristotle's ethical theories do not exhaust his views about character as has traditionally been assumed, and, second, that his treatment of natural character in the biological treatises provides theconceptual and ideological foundation for his views about habituation as developed in his ethics. Author Mariska Leunissen takes seriously Aristotle's - often ignored--claim that nature is one of the factors through which men become "good and capable of fine deeds". Part I ("The Physiology ofNatural Character") analyzes, in three chapters, Aristotle's notion of natural character as it is developed in the biological treatises and its role in moral development, especially as it affects women and certain "barbarians" - groups who are typically left out of accounts of Aristotle's ethics.Leunissen also discuss its relevance for our understanding of physiognomical ideas in Aristotle. Part II ("The Physiology of Moral Development") explores the psychophysical changes in body and soul one is required to undergo in the process of acquiring moral virtues. It includes a discussion ofAristotle's eugenic views, of his identification of habituation as a form of human perfection, and of his claims about the moral deficiencies of women that link them to his beliefs about their biological imperfections.

  • Against humanity : lessons from the Lord's Resistance Army / Sam Dubal
    BJ 1533 H9 D83 2018
    "Gunya is a woman in her late twenties. Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abducted her when she was eleven years old and forcefully conscripted her into the rebel ranks. Gunya spent a little over a decade with the rebels before deserting. While there, she gave birth to a son with Onen, an LRA soldier. Though abducted, she expresses her continued support for the LRA and their tactics, admitting that she sometimes thinks of going back to the lum [bush] when life becomes hard as a civilian at home."

    This is not a book about crimes against humanity. Rather, it is an indictment of the very idea of humanity, the concept that lies at the heart of human rights and humanitarian missions.

    Based on fieldwork in northern Uganda, anthropologist and medical doctor Sam Dubal brings readers into the inner circle of the Lord's Resistance Army, an insurgent group accused of rape, forced conscription of children, and inhumane acts of violence. Dubal speaks with former LRA rebels as they find personal meaning in wartime violence, politics, and spirituality--experiences that observers often place outside of humanity's boundaries. What emerges is an unorthodox and provocative question: What would it mean to be truly against humanity? And how does one honor life existing outside hegemonic notions of the good?

  • Cambridge pragmatism : from Peirce and James to Ramsey and Wittgenstein / Cheryl Misak
    B 832 M57 2016
    Cheryl Misak offers a strikingly new view of the development of philosophy in the twentieth century. Pragmatism, the home-grown philosophy of America, thinks of truth not as a static relation between a sentence and the believer-independent world, but rather, a belief that works. The foundersof pragmatism, Peirce and James, developed this idea in more (Peirce) and less (James) objective ways. The standard story of the reception of American pragmatism in England is that Russell and Moore savaged James's theory, and that pragmatism has never fully recovered. An alternative, and underappreciated, story is told here. The brilliant Cambridge mathematician, philosopher and economist, FrankRamsey, was in the mid-1920s heavily influenced by the almost-unheard-of Peirce and was developing a pragmatist position of great promise. He then transmitted that pragmatism to his friend Wittgenstein, although had Ramsey lived past the age of 26 to see what Wittgenstein did with that position,Ramsey would not have like what he saw.

  • On freedom : technology, capital, medium / Peter Trawny ; translated by Richard Lambert
    B 105 U5 T7313 2017
    No Marketing Blurb

  • Didactique de la création artistique : approches et perspectives de recherche / Grazia Giacco, John Didier et Francesco Spampinato (dir.)
    BH 301 C84 D535 2017

  • How to die : an ancient guide to the end of life / Seneca ; edited, translated, and introduced by James S. Romm
    BD 444 S46 2018

    Timeless wisdom on death and dying from the celebrated Stoic philosopher Seneca

    "It takes an entire lifetime to learn how to die," wrote the Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca (c. 4 BC-65 AD). He counseled readers to "study death always," and took his own advice, returning to the subject again and again in all his writings, yet he never treated it in a complete work. How to Die gathers in one volume, for the first time, Seneca's remarkable meditations on death and dying. Edited and translated by James S. Romm, How to Die reveals a provocative thinker and dazzling writer who speaks with a startling frankness about the need to accept death or even, under certain conditions, to seek it out.

    Seneca believed that life is only a journey toward death and that one must rehearse for death throughout life. Here, he tells us how to practice for death, how to die well, and how to understand the role of a good death in a good life. He stresses the universality of death, its importance as life's final rite of passage, and its ability to liberate us from pain, slavery, or political oppression.

    Featuring beautifully rendered new translations, How to Die also includes an enlightening introduction, notes, the original Latin texts, and an epilogue presenting Tacitus's description of Seneca's grim suicide.


  • The moral meaning of nature : Nietzsche's Darwinian religion and its critics / Peter J. Woodford
    B 3318 N3 W66 2018
    What, if anything, does biological evolution tell us about the nature of religion, ethical values, or even the meaning and purpose of life? The Moral Meaning of Nature sheds new light on these enduring questions by examining the significance of an earlier--and unjustly neglected--discussion of Darwin in late nineteenth-century Germany.

    We start with Friedrich Nietzsche, whose writings staged one of the first confrontations with the Christian tradition using the resources of Darwinian thought. The lebensphilosophie , or "life-philosophy," that arose from his engagement with evolutionary ideas drew responses from other influential thinkers, including Franz Overbeck, Georg Simmel, and Heinrich Rickert. These critics all offered cogent challenges to Nietzsche's appropriation of the newly transforming biological sciences, his negotiation between science and religion, and his interpretation of the implications of Darwinian thought. They also each proposed alternative ways of making sense of Nietzsche's unique question concerning the meaning of biological evolution "for life." At the heart of the discussion were debates about the relation of facts and values, the place of divine purpose in the understanding of nonhuman and human agency, the concept of life, and the question of whether the sciences could offer resources to satisfy the human urge to discover sources of value in biological processes. The Moral Meaning of Nature focuses on the historical background of these questions, exposing the complex ways in which they recur in contemporary philosophical debate.

  • Beauty and the end of art : Wittgenstein, plurality, and perception / Sonia Sedivy
    BH 39 S4135 2016
    Beauty and the End of Art shows how a resurgence of interest in beauty and a sense of ending in Western art are challenging us to rethink art, beauty and their relationship. By arguing that Wittgenstein's later work and contemporary theory of perception offer just what we need for a unified approach to art and beauty, Sonia Sedivy provides new answers to these contemporary challenges. These new accounts also provide support for the Wittgensteinian realism and theory of perception that make them possible.
    Wittgenstein's subtle form of realism explains artworks in terms of norm governed practices that have their own varied constitutive norms and values. Wittgensteinian realism also suggests that diverse beauties become available and compelling in different cultural eras and bring a shared 'higher-order' value into view. With this framework in place, Sedivy argues that perception is a form of engagement with the world that draws on our conceptual capacities. This approach explains how perceptual experience and the perceptible presence of the world are of value, helping to account for the diversity of beauties that are available in different historical contexts and why the many faces of beauty allow us to experience the value of the world's perceptible presence.
    Carefully examining contemporary debates about art, aesthetics and perception, Beauty and the End of Art presents an original approach. Insights from such diverse thinkers as Immanuel Kant, Hans-Georg Gadamer and Arthur Danto, Alexander Nehamas, Elaine Scarry and Dave Hickey are woven together to reveal how they make good sense if we bring contemporary theory of perception and Wittgensteinian realism into the conversation.

  • The dark side of camp aesthetics : queer economies of dirt, dust and patina / edited by Ingrid Hotz-Davies, Georg Vogt, and Franziska Bergmann
    BH 301 C36 D37 2018

    "Camp" is often associated with glamour, surfaces and an ostentatious display of chic, but as these authors argue, there is an underside to it that has often gone unnoticed: camp's simultaneous investment in dirt, vulgarity, the discarded and rejected, the abject. This book explores how camp challenges and at the same time celebrates what is arguably the single most important and foundational cultural division, that between the dirty and the clean. In refocusing camp as a phenomenon of the dark underside as much as of the glamorous surface, the collection hopes to offer an important contribution to our understanding of the cultural politics and aesthetics of camp.


  • Partial values : a comparative study in the limits of objectivity / Kevin DeLapp
    BD 220 D45 2018
    When, if ever, is it permissible to afford special consideration to friends and family? How can we strive to be objective in our thinking, and is this always a feasible or appropriate aim? This book examines the categories of impartiality and objectivity by showing how they frame certain debates in epistemology, moral psychology, and metaethics, arguing that many traditional conceptions of objectivity fail to capture what is important to our identities as knowers, social beings, and moral agents. A new thesis of 'perspectival realism' is offered as a critique of strong objectivity, but in a way that avoids radical subjectivism or relativism. Locally-situated identities can provide their own criteria of epistemic and moral justification, and we may aspire to be impartial in a way that need not sacrifice particular perspectives and relationships. Arguments throughout the book draw heavily on resources from classical Chinese philosophy, and significant attention is given to applications of arguments to concrete issues in applied ethics, cross-cultural anthropology, and political science.

  • The aesthetics and affects of cuteness / edited by Joshua Paul Dale, Joyce Goggin, Julia Leyda, Anthony P. McIntyre, and Diane Negra
    BH 301 C4 A37 2016

    Cuteness is one of the most culturally pervasive aesthetics of the new millennium and its rapid social proliferation suggests that the affective responses it provokes find particular purchase in a contemporary era marked by intensive media saturation and spreading economic precarity. Rejecting superficial assessments that would deem the ever-expandingplethora of cute texts trivial, The Aesthetics and Affects of Cuteness directs serious scholarly attention from a variety of academic disciplines to this ubiquitous phenomenon. The sheer plasticity of this minor aesthetic is vividly on display in this collection which draws together analyses from around the world examining cuteness's fundamental role in cultural expressions stemming from such diverse sources as military cultures, high-end contemporary art worlds , and animal shelters. Pushing beyond prevailing understandings that associate cuteness solely with childhood or which posit an interpolated parental bond as its primary affective attachment, the essays in this collection variously draw connections between cuteness and the social, political, economic, and technological conditions of the early twenty-first century and in doing so generate fresh understandings of the central role cuteness plays in the recalibration of contemporary subjectivities.  


  • Pragmatic encounters / Richard J. Bernstein
    B 945 B4761 2016

    Richard J. Bernstein is a leading exponent of American pragmatism and one of the foremost philosophers of the twentieth century. In this collection he takes a pragmatic approach to specific problems and issues to demonstrate the ongoing importance of this philosophical tradition. Topics under discussion include multiculturalism, political public life, evil and religion. Individual philosophers studied are Kant, Arendt, Rorty, Habermas, Dewey and Trotsky. Each of the sixteen essays, many of which are published here for the first time, offers a way of bridging contemporary philosophical differences. This book will be of interest to scholars of philosophy and those researching social and political theory.


  • Significance and system : essays on Kant's ethics / Mark Timmons
    B 2799 E8 T57 2017
    Significance and System: Essays on Kant's Ethics brings together central lines of thought in Mark Timmons's work on Kant's moral theory. The first part of the book concerns the interpretation and justification of the categorical imperative in which Timmons argues for a "differential roles"interpretation of the categorical imperative, according to which distinct formulations of this principle play different roles in the overall economy of Kant's ethics. In addition he offers a detailed interpretation of the analytic/synthetic distinction in Kant's ethics that plays a central role inKant's justification of his supreme moral principle. In the second part, Timmons addresses questions about the relation between motive and rightness, arguing, for example, that contemporary Kantians have misunderstood that relation. This part also examines Kant's attempt in the Doctrine of Virtue toground a system of ethical duties in the categorical imperative. In part three, Timmons turns to issues in Kant's psychology of moral evil, including the psychology of the devilish vices. Throughout Timmons combines interpretive insight with a critical eye in interpreting and criticizing Kant'sethical thought.

  • Reading Marx / Slavoj Žižek, Frank Ruda and Agon Hamza
    B 3305 M74 Z59 2018
    Marx's critique of political economy is vital for understanding the crisis of contemporary capitalism. Yet the nature of its relevance and some of its key tenets remain poorly understood. This bold intervention brings together the work of leading Marx scholars Slavoj �i�ek, Frank Ruda and Agon Hamza, to offer a fresh, radical reinterpretation of Marxism that explains the failures of neoliberalism and lays the foundations for a new emancipatory politics.

    Avoiding trite comparisons between Marx's worldview and our current political scene, the authors show that the current relevance and value of Marx's thought can better be explained by placing his key ideas in dialogue with those that have attempted to replace them. Reading Marx through Hegel and Lacan, particle physics, and modern political trends, the authors provide new ways to explain the crisis in contemporary capitalism and resist fundamentalism in all its forms. Reading Marx will find a wide audience amongst activists and scholars.

  • Précurseurs et disciples de Descartes
    B 1875 S3 1969

  • Let the people think, a selection of essays by Bertrand Russell
    B 1649 R93L4

  • Vedic metaphysics / Jagadguru Śaṅkarācārya Bharatī Kṛṣṇa Tīrthaji
    B 132 V3B447 1978

  • The philosophy of Advaita : a transition from Śaṅkara to Śrī Aurobindo / Dr. Priti Sinha
    B 132 A3S56 1986

  • Les Structuralistes, les linguistes, Michel Foucault, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Jacques Lacan, Louis Althusser, les critiques littéraires
    B 841.4 C67
page last updated on: Sunday 22 July 2018
Back to top Back to top