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Philosophy, Aesthetics, Ethics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range B - BD (Philosophy) and BH - BJ (Aesthetics, Ethics) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.

  • Knowing humanity in the social world : the path of Steve Fuller's social epistemology / Francis X. Remedios, Val Dusek

  • Formal approach to the metaphysics of perspectives : points of view as access / Juan J. Colomina-Almiñana

  • BUILDING THEORIES heuristics and hypotheses in sciences

  • Fable, method, and imagination in Descartes / james Griffith

  • The Worlds of Positivism A Global Intellectual History, 1770-1930

  • The theory of info-dynamics : rational foundations of information-knowledge dynamics / Kofi K. Dompere

  • Mountains, mobilities and movement Christos Kakalis, Emily Goetsch, editors

  • Moral claims in the age of spectacles : shaping the social imaginary / Brian M. Lowe
    BJ 320 L69 2018eb

  • The politics and business of self-interest from Tocqueville to Trump / Richard Ned Lebow

  • Emancipation, democracy and the modern critique of law : reconsidering Habermas / Mikael Spång
    B 3258 H324S73 2018eb

  • Power, culture and situated research methodology autobiography, field, text / Cecilie Basberg Neumann, Iver B. Neumann
    BD 340 N48 2017eb

  • The feeling of certainty : psychosocial perspectives on identity and difference / Nikolay Mintchev, R.D. Hinshelwood, editors

  • The Cambridge companion to medieval logic / edited by Catarina Dutilh Novaes and Stephen Read
    BC 34 C36 2016eb
    This volume, the first dedicated and comprehensive companion to medieval logic, covers both the Latin and the Arabic traditions, and shows that they were in fact sister traditions, which both arose against the background of a Hellenistic heritage and which influenced one another over the centuries. A series of chapters by both established and younger scholars covers the whole period including early and late developments, and offers new insights into this extremely rich period in the history of logic. The volume is divided into two parts, 'Periods and Traditions' and 'Themes', allowing readers to engage with the subject from both historical and more systematic perspectives. It will be a must-read for students and scholars of medieval philosophy, the history of logic, and the history of ideas.

  • The Cambridge companion to the problem of evil / edited by Chad Meister, Paul K. Moser
    BJ 1401 C27 2017eb
    For many centuries philosophers have been discussing the problem of evil - one of the greatest problems of intellectual history. There are many facets to the problem, and for students and scholars unfamiliar with the vast literature on the subject, grasping the main issues can be a daunting task. This Companion provides a stimulating introduction to the problem of evil. More than an introduction to the subject, it is a state-of-the-art contribution to the field which provides critical analyses of and creative insights on this longstanding problem. Fresh themes in the book include evil and the meaning of life, beauty and evil, evil and cosmic evolution, and anti-theodicy. Evil is discussed from the perspectives of the major monotheistic religions, agnosticism, and atheism. Written by leading scholars in clear and accessible prose, this book is an ideal companion for undergraduate and graduate students, teachers, and scholars across the disciplines.

  • The Cambridge companion to ancient ethics / edited by Christopher Bobonich
    BJ 161 C36 2017eb
    The field of ancient Greek ethics is increasingly emerging as a major branch of philosophical enquiry, and students and scholars of ancient philosophy will find this Companion to be a rich and invaluable guide to the themes and movements which characterised the discipline from the Pre-Socratics to the Neo-Platonists. Several chapters are dedicated to the central figures of Plato and Aristotle, and others explore the ethical thought of the Stoics, the Epicureans, the Skeptics, and Plotinus. Further chapters examine important themes that cut across these schools, including virtue and happiness, friendship, elitism, impartiality, and the relationship between ancient eudaimonism and modern morality. Written by leading scholars and drawing on cutting-edge research to illuminate the questions of ancient ethics, the book will provide students and specialists with an indispensable critical overview of the full range of ancient Greek ethics.

  • The Cambridge companion to Fichte / edited by David James, University of Warwick, and Günter Zöller, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich
    B 2848 C36 2016eb
    Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762-1814) was the founding figure of the philosophical movement known as German idealism, a branch of thought which grew out of Kant's critical philosophy. Fichte's work formed the crucial link between eighteenth-century Enlightenment thought and philosophical, as well as literary, Romanticism. Some of his ideas also foreshadow later nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in philosophy and in political thought, including existentialism, nationalism and socialism. This volume offers essays on all the major aspects of Fichte's philosophy, ranging from the successive versions of his foundational philosophical science or Wissenschaftslehre, through his ethical and political thought, to his philosophies of history and religion. All the main stages of Fichte's philosophical career and development are charted, and his ideas are placed in their historical and intellectual context. New readers will find this the most convenient and accessible guide to Fichte currently available. Advanced students and specialists will find a conspectus of recent developments in the interpretation of Fichte.

  • The Cambridge companion to German idealism / edited by Karl Ameriks, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    B 2745 C36 2017eb
    This updated edition offers a comprehensive, penetrating, and informative guide to what is regarded as the classical period of German philosophy. Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Schelling are all discussed in detail, along with contemporaries such as Hölderlin, Novalis, and Schopenhauer, whose influence was considerable but whose work is less well known in the English-speaking world. Leading scholars trace and explore the unifying themes of German Idealism and discuss its relationship to Romanticism, the Enlightenment, and the culture of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe. This second edition offers an updated bibliography and includes three entirely new chapters, which address aesthetic reflection and human nature, the chemical revolution after Kant, and organism and system in German Idealism. The result is an illuminating overview of a rich and complex philosophical movement, and will appeal to a wide range of interested readers in philosophy, literature, theology, German studies, and the history of ideas.

  • Thinking without banisters : essays in understanding, 1953-1975 / Hannah Arendt ; edited and with an introduction by Jerome Kohn
    B 945 A694 2018
    Hannah Arendt was born in Germany in 1906 and lived in America from 1941 until her death in 1975. Thus her life spanned the tumultuous years of the twentieth century, as did her thought. She did not consider herself a philosopher, though she studied and maintained close relationships with two great philosophers--Karl Jaspers and Martin Heidegger--throughout their lives. She was a thinker, in search not of metaphysical truth but of the meaning of appearances and events. She was a questioner rather than an answerer, and she wrote what she thought, principally to encourage others to think for themselves. Fearless of the consequences of thinking, Arendt found courage woven in each and every strand of human freedom.

    In 1951 she published The Origins of Totalitarianism, in 1958 The Human Condition, in 1961 Between Past and Future, in 1963 On Revolution and Eichmann in Jerusalem, in 1968 Men in Dark Times, in 1970 On Violence, in 1972 Crises of the Republic, and in 1978, posthumously, The Life of the Mind. Starting at the turn of the twenty-first century, Schocken Books has published a series of collections of Arendt's unpublished and uncollected writings, of which Thinking Without a Banister is the fifth volume.

    The title refers to Arendt's description of her experience of thinking, an activity she indulged without any of the traditional religious, moral, political, or philosophic pillars of support. The book's contents are varied: the essays, lectures, reviews, interviews, speeches, and editorials, taken together, manifest the relentless activity of her mind as well as her character, acquainting the reader with the person Arendt was, and who has hardly yet been appreciated or understood.

    (Edited and with an introduction by Jerome Kohn)

  • Benjamin and Adorno on art and art criticism : critique of art / Thijs Lijster
    BH 203 L55 2017eb

  • Foucault on painting / Catherine M. Soussloff
    B 2430 F724 S68 2017

    Michel Foucault had been concerned about painting and the meaning of the image from his earliest publications, yet this aspect of his thought is largely neglected within the disciplines of art history and aesthetic theory. In Foucault on Painting , Catherine M. Soussloff argues that Foucault's sustained engagement with European art history critically addresses present concerns about the mediated nature of the image in the digital age.

    Foucault's writing on painting covers four discrete periods in European art history (seventeenth-century southern Baroque, mid-nineteenth century French painting, Surrealism, and figurative painting in the 1960s and '70s) as well as five individual artists: Vel#65533;zquez, Manet, Magritte, Paul Reyberolle, and G#65533;rard Fromanger. As Soussloff reveals in this book, Foucault followed a French intellectual tradition dating back to the seventeenth century, which understands painting as a separate area of knowledge. Painting, a practice long considered silent in its operations and effects, afforded Foucault an ideal discipline to think about history and philosophy simultaneously. Using a comparative approach grounded in art history and aesthetics, Soussloff explores the meaning of painting for Foucault's philosophy, and for contemporary art theory, proposing a new relevance for a Foucauldian view of ethics and the pleasures and predicaments of contemporary existence.

  • Varieties of skepticism : essays after Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell / edited by James Conant and Andrea Kern
    BD 201 V37 2014

    This volume brings out the varieties of forms of philosophical skepticism that have continued to preoccupy philosophers for the past of couple of centuries, as well as the specific varieties of philosophical response that these have engendered -- above all, in the work of those who have sought to take their cue from Kant, Wittgenstein, or Cavell -- and to illuminate how these philosophical approaches are related to and bear upon one another. The philosophers brought together in this volume are united by the thought that a proper appreciation of the depth of the skeptical challenge must reveal it to be deeply disquieting, in the sense that skepticism threatens not just some set of theoretical commitments, but also-and fundamentally-our very sense of self, world, and other. Second, that skepticism is the proper starting point for any serious attempt to make sense of what philosophy is, and to gauge the prospects of philosophical progress.

  • Shanzhai : deconstruction in Chinese / Byung-Chul Han ; translated by Philippa Hurd
    BH 301 O75 H3613 2017

    Tracing the thread of "decreation" in Chinese thought, from constantly changing classical masterpieces to fake cell phones that are better than the original.

    Shanzhai is a Chinese neologism that means "fake," originally coined to describe knock-off cell phones marketed under such names as Nokir and Samsing. These cell phones were not crude forgeries but multifunctional, stylish, and as good as or better than the originals. Shanzhai has since spread into other parts of Chinese life, with shanzhai books, shanzhai politicians, shanzhai stars. There is a shanzhai Harry Potter: Harry Potter and the Porcelain Doll , in which Harry takes on his nemesis Yandomort. In the West, this would be seen as piracy, or even desecration, but in Chinese culture, originals are continually transformed -- deconstructed. In this volume in the Untimely Meditations series, Byung-Chul Han traces the thread of deconstruction, or "decreation," in Chinese thought, from ancient masterpieces that invite inscription and transcription to Maoism -- "a kind a shanzhai Marxism," Han writes.

    Han discusses the Chinese concepts of quan, or law, which literally means the weight that slides back and forth on a scale, radically different from Western notions of absoluteness; zhen ji , or original, determined not by an act of creation but by unending process; xian zhan , or seals of leisure, affixed by collectors and part of the picture's composition; fuzhi , or copy, a replica of equal value to the original; and shanzhai . The Far East, Han writes, is not familiar with such "pre-deconstructive" factors as original or identity. Far Eastern thought begins with deconstruction.

  • Forgetfulness : making the modern culture of amnesia / Francis O'Gorman
    BD 181.7 O36 2017
    Forgetfulness is a book about modern culture and its profound rejection of the past. It traces the emergence in recent history of the idea that what is important in human life and work is what will happen in the future. Francis O'Gorman shows how forgetting has been embraced as a requirement for modern existence and how our education, as well as life with fast-moving technology, further disconnects us from our pasts. But he also examines the cultural narratives that urge us to resist our collective amnesia. O'Gorman argues that such narratives, in rich but oblique ways, indicate our guilt about modernity's great unmooring from history. Forgetfulness asks what the absence of history does to our sense of purpose, as well as what belonging both to time and place might mean in cultures without a memory. It is written in praise of the best achievement and deeds of the past, but is also an expression of profound anxiety about what forgetting them is doing to us.

  • Toward a non-humanist humanism : theory after 9/11 / William V. Spanos
    B 821 S73 2017
    Assesses the limits and possibilities of humanism for engaging with issues of pressing political and cultural concern.

  • Merleau-Ponty for architects / Jonathan Hale
    B 2430 M3764 H34 2017

    The philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908#65533;1961) has influenced the design work of architects as diverse as Steven Holl and Peter Zumthor, as well as informing renowned schools of architectural theory, notably those around Dalibor Vesely at Cambridge, Kenneth Frampton, David Leatherbarrow and Alberto P#65533;z-G#65533;mez in North America and Juhani Pallasmaa in Finland. Merleau-Ponty suggested that the value of people#65533;s experience of the world gained through their immediate bodily engagement with it remains greater than the value of understanding gleaned through abstract mathematical, scientific or technological systems.

    This book summarizes what Merleau-Ponty#65533;s philosophy has to offer specifically for architects. It locates architectural thinking in the context of his work, placing it in relation to themes such as space, movement, materiality and creativity, introduces key texts, helps decode difficult terms and provides quick reference for further reading.

  • Existentialism and excess : the life and times of Jean-Paul Sartre / Gary Cox
    B 2430 S34 C67 2016
    Jean-Paul Sartre is an undisputed giant of twentieth-century philosophy. His intellectual writings popularizing existentialism combined with his creative and artistic flair have made him a legend of French thought. His tumultuous personal life - so inextricably bound up with his philosophical thinking - is a fascinating tale of love and lust, drug abuse, high profile fallings-out and political and cultural rebellion. This substantial and meticulously researched biography is accessible, fast-paced, often amusing and at times deeply moving. Existentialism and Excess covers all the main events of Sartre's remarkable seventy-five-year life from his early years as a precocious brat devouring his grandfather's library, through his time as a brilliant student in Paris, his wilderness years as a provincial teacher-writer experimenting with mescaline, his World War II adventures as a POW and member of the resistance, his post-war politicization, his immense amphetamine fueled feats of writing productivity, his harem of women, his many travels and his final decline into blindness and old age. Along the way there are countless intriguing anecdotes, some amusing, some tragic, some controversial: his loathing of crustaceans and his belief that he was being pursued by a giant lobster, his escape from a POW camp, the bombing of his apartment, his influence on the May 1968 uprising and his many love affairs. Cox deftly moves from these episodes to discussing his intellectual development, his famous feuds with Aron, Camus, and Merleau-Ponty, his encounters with other giant figures of his day: Roosevelt, Hemingway, Heidegger, John Huston, Mao, Castro, Che Guevara, Khrushchev and Tito, and, above all, his long, complex and creative relationship with Simone de Beauvoir. Existentialism and Excess also gives serious consideration to Sartre's ideas and many philosophical works, novels, stories, plays and biographies, revealing their intimate connection with his personal life.Cox has written an entertaining, thought-provoking and compulsive book, much like the man himself.

  • Aquinas on virtue : a causal reading / Nicholas Austin
    B 765 T54 A98 2017

    Aquinas on Virtue: A Causal Reading is an original interpretation of one of the most compelling accounts of virtue in the Western tradition, that of the great theologian and philosopher Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274). Taking as its starting point Aquinas's neglected definition of virtue in terms of its "causes," this book offers a systematic analysis of Aquinas on the nature, genesis, and role of virtue in human life.

    Drawing on connections and contrasts between Aquinas and contemporary treatments of virtue, Austin argues that Aquinas's causal virtue theory retains its normative power today. As well as providing a synoptic account of Aquinas on virtue, the book includes an extended treatment of the cardinal virtue of temperance, an argument for the superiority of Aquinas's concept of "habit" over modern psychological accounts, and a rethinking of the relation between grace and virtue. With an approach that is distinctively theological yet strongly conversant with philosophy, this study will offer specialists a bold new interpretation of Aquinas's virtue theory while giving students a systematic introduction with suggested readings from his Summa Theologiae and On the Virtues .

  • Adorno's theory of philosophical and aesthetic truth / Owen Hulatt
    B 3199 A34 H844 2016
    In Adorno's Theory of Philosophical and Aesthetic Truth , Owen Hulatt undertakes an original reading of Theodor W. Adorno's epistemology and its material underpinnings, deepening our understanding of his theories of truth, art, and the nonidentical. Hulatt's novel interpretation casts Adorno's theory of philosophical and aesthetic truth as substantially unified, supporting the thinker's claim that both philosophy and art are capable of being true.

    For Adorno, truth is produced when rhetorical "texture" combines with cognitive "performance," leading to the breakdown of concepts that mediate the experience of the consciousness. Both philosophy and art manifest these features, although philosophy enacts these conceptual issues directly, while art does so obliquely. Hulatt builds a robust argument for Adorno's claim that concepts ineluctably misconstrue their objects. He also puts the still influential thinker into conversation with Hegel, Husserl, Frazer, Sohn-Rethel, Benjamin, Strawson, Dahlhaus, Habermas, and Caillois, among many others.

  • Adorno and philosophical modernism : the inside of things / Roger S. Foster
    B 3199 A34 F669 2016
    Adorno and Philosophical Modernism: The Inside of Things offers an original interpretation and vigorous defense of Theodor Adorno's idea of philosophy as the practice of what Roger Foster calls "philosophical modernism." Adorno's philosophical writings, from the early 1930s to the mature works of the late 1960s, are deeply informed by a distinctively modernist vision of human experience. This book seeks to establish that Adorno's unique and lasting contribution to philosophy consists in his sustained and rigorous development of this modernist vision into an encompassing practice of philosophical interpretation. The essential features of this vision can be discerned in all of Adorno's major writings in philosophy, social theory, and aesthetics. Its defining element is the idea of a pattern underlying ordinary experience, which, although not directly accessible, can be disclosed by the reconstructive work of philosophical or literary language. This vision, Foster argues, can be discerned in the major works of literary modernism (including Woolf, Proust, and Musil) as well as in the interpretive technique of psychoanalysis developed by Sigmund Freud. The importance of Adorno's contribution to twentieth-century philosophy can only be fully appreciated by understanding how he developed this vision into an overarching practice of philosophical interpretation that furnished a coherent and profound response to the decay of experience afflicting late-modern societies. In this book, Foster expounds that interpretive practice, exploring its ramifications and, in particular, its relation with literary modernism, and places it in critical dialogue with alternative philosophical responses.

  • The Routledge handbook of neoplatonism / edited by Pauliina Remes and Svetla Slaveva-Griffin
    B 517 R68 2014eb

  • Superpositions : Laruelle and the humanities / edited by Rocco Gangle and Julius Greve
    B 2433 L35854 S87 2017
    One of the most important French philosophers working today, Francois Laruelle has developed an innovative and powerful repertoire of concepts across an oeuvre spanning four decades and more than twenty books. His work--termed non-philosophy or, more recently, non-standard philosophy--has garnered international attention in recent years and stands likely to have a significant impact on the critical practices of the humanities in the near future. Bringing together some of the most prominent scholars of Laruelle, Superpositions: Laruelle and the Humanities explores the intersections of Laruelle's work with multiple discourses within the humanities, including philosophy, critical theory, political theory, media studies, and religious studies. The book addresses two main questions: In what relation does non-philosophical thought stand with respect to the materials and methods of other disciplines? How can Laruelle's non-standard philosophy be applied, appropriated and used by other discourses? Superpositions provides a useful introduction to Laruelle's work for students and scholars, and marks an important intervention into one of the most vigorous and contested areas of contemporary scholarship in the critical humanities.

  • New forms of revolt : essays on Kristeva's intimate politics / edited by Sarah K. Hansen and Rebecca Tuvel
    B 2430 K7544 N49 2017
    Essays explore the significance of Julia Kristeva's concept of intimate revolt for social and political philosophy.

  • The post-critical Kant : understanding the critical philosophy through the Opus postumum / Bryan Wesley Hall
    B 2794 O63 H35 2015

    In this book, Bryan Wesley Hall breaks new ground in Kant scholarship, exploring the gap in Kant#65533;s Critical philosophy in relation to his post-Critical work by turning to Kant#65533;s final, unpublished work, the so-called Opus Postumum. Although Kant considered this project to be the "keystone" of his philosophical efforts, it has been largely neglected by scholars. Hall argues that only by understanding the Opus Postumum can we fully comprehend both Kant#65533;s mature view as well as his Critical project.

    In letters from 1798, Kant claims to have discovered a "gap" in the Critical philosophy that requires effecting a "transition from the metaphysical foundations of natural science to physics"; unfortunately, Kant does not make clear exactly what this gap is or how the transition is supposed to fill the gap. To resolve these issues, Hall draws on the Opus Postumum , arguing that Kant#65533;s transition project can solve certain perennial problems with the Critical philosophy. This volume provides a powerful alternative to all current interpretations of the Opus Postumum , arguing that Kant#65533;s transition project is best seen as the post-Critical culmination of his Critical philosophy. Hall carefully examines the deep connections between the Opus Postumum and the view Kant develops in the Critique of Pure Reason , to suggest that properly understanding the post-Critical Kant will significantly revise our view of Kant#65533;s Critical period.

  • The Dutch legacy : radical thinkers of the 17th century and the Enlightenment / edited by Sonja Lavaert and Winfried Schroder
    B 3871 D88 2017
    While Spinoza's impact on the early Enlightenment has always found due attention of historians of philosophy, several 17th-century Dutch thinkers who were active before Spinoza's Tractatus theologico-politicus was published have been largely neglected: in particular Spinoza's teacher, Franciscus van den Enden ( Vrye Politijke Stellingen , 1665), Johan and Pieter de la Court ( Consideratien van Staet , 1660, Politike discoursen , 1662), Lodewijk Meyer ( Philosophia S. Scripturae Interpres , 1666), the anonymous De Jure Ecclesiasticorum (1665), and Adriaan Koerbagh ( Een Bloemhof van allerley lieflijkheyd , 1668, Een Ligt schynende in duystere plaatsen , 1668). The articles of this volume focus on their political philosophy as well as their philosophy of religion in order to assess their contributions to the development of radical movements (republicanism / anti-monarchism, critique of religion, atheism) in the Enlightenment.

  • Sympathy in perception / Mark Eli Kalderon
    B 828.45 K35 2018
    The philosophy of perception has been an important topic throughout history, appealing to thinkers in antiquity and the middle ages as well as to figures such as Kant, Bergson and others. In this wide-ranging study, Mark Eli Kalderon presents multiple perspectives on the general nature of perception, discussing touch and hearing as well as vision. He draws on the rich history of the subject and shows how analytic and continental approaches to it are connected, providing readers with insights from both traditions and arguing for new orientations when thinking about the presentation of perception. His discussion addresses issues including tactile metaphors, sympathy in relation to the concept of fellow-feeling, and the Wave Theory of sound. His comprehensive and thoughtful study presents bold and systematic investigations into current theory, informed by centuries of philosophical enquiry, and will be important for those working on ontological and metaphysical aspects of perception and feeling.

  • Kierkegaard, literature, and the arts / edited by Eric Ziolkowski
    B 4377 K4558 2018
    In this volume fifteen eminent scholars illuminate the broad and often underappreciated variety of the nineteenth-century Danish thinker S#65533;ren Kierkegaard's engagements with literature and the arts.

    The essays in Kierkegaard, Literature, and the Arts , contextualized with an insightful introduction by Eric Ziolkowski, explore Kierkegaard's relationship to literature (poetry, prose, and storytelling), the performing arts (theater, music, opera, and dance), and the visual arts, including film. The collection is rounded out with a comparative section that considers Kierkegaard in juxtaposition with a romantic poet (William Blake), a modern composer (Arnold Schoenberg), and a contemporary singer-songwriter (Bob Dylan). Kierkegaard was as much an aesthetic thinker as a philosopher, and his philosophical writings are complemented by his literary and music criticism.

    Kierkegaard, Literature, and the Arts will offer much of interest to scholars concerned with Kierkegaard as well as teachers, performers, and readers in the various aesthetic fields discussed.

    CONTRIBUTORS: Christopher B. Barnett, Martijn Boven, Anne Margrete Fiskvik, Joakim Garff, Ronald M. Green, Peder Jothen, Ragni Linnet, Jamie A. Lorentzen, Edward F. Mooney, George Pattison, Nils Holger Petersen, Howard Pickett, Marcia C. Robinson, James Rovira

  • Advances / Jacques Derrida ; translated and with an introduction by Philippe Lynes
    B 387 M373 D4713 2017

    Originally published in 1995, Advances was first written by Jacques Derrida as a long foreword to a book by one of his most promising former students, the philosopher Serge Margel's Le Tombeau du Dieu Artisan ( The Tomb of the Craftsman ). What Derrida uncovers for us is Margel's own unique theory of the promise in relation to an an-archic, pre-chronological temporality, in conjunction with Margel's radical rereading of Plato's Timaeus . As Derrida states right away, Margel's reading is a new one, a new reading of the Demiurge. A new promise. A new advance .

    In this magisterial late essay by Derrida, what the reader soon discovers is in part a conversation with his former student, as well as an opening for a new reflection on our current ecological and political crises that are all the more urgent today where the possibility of giving ourselves death as a human race and the end of the world is now, within an era of climate change, more real than ever.

    As part of Univocal's Pharmakon series, this essay, itself published in advance, becomes a brief but powerful light pointing toward Univocal's forthcoming publication of the translation of Serge Margel's Le Tombeau du Dieu Artisan . "Once again the Timaeus , of course, but a different Timaeus , a new Demiurge, I promise."

  • The problem of universals in early modern philosophy / edited by Stefano Di Bella and Tad M. Schmaltz
    B 105 U5 P77 2017
    The ancient topic of universals was central to scholastic philosophy, which raised the question of whether universals exist as Platonic forms, as instantiated Aristotelian forms, as concepts abstracted from singular things, or as words that have universal signification. It might be thoughtthat this question lost its importance after the decline of scholasticism in the modern period. However, the fourteen contributions contained in The Problem of Univerals in Early Modern Philosophy indicate that the issue of universals retained its vitality in modern philosophy. Modern philosophersin fact were interested in 3 sets of issues concerning universals: (i) issues concerning the ontological status of universals, (ii) issues concerning the psychology of the formation of universal concepts or terms, and (iii) issues concerning the value and use of universal concepts or terms in theacquisition of knowledge. Chapters in this volume consider the various forms of "Platonism," "conceptualism" and "nominalism" (and distinctive combinations thereof) that emerged from the consideration of such issues in the work of modern philosophers. Furthermore, this volume covers not only thecanonical modern figures, namely, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant, but also more neglected figures such as Pierre Gassendi, Pierre-Sylvain Regis, Nicolas Malebranche, Henry More, Ralph Cudworth and John Norris.

  • Ethics in the conflicts of modernity : an essay on desire, practical reasoning, and narrative / Alasdair MacIntyre
    B 105 D44 M33 2016
    Alasdair MacIntyre explores some central philosophical, political and moral claims of modernity and argues that a proper understanding of human goods requires a rejection of these claims. In a wide-ranging discussion, he considers how normative and evaluative judgments are to be understood, how desire and practical reasoning are to be characterized, what it is to have adequate self-knowledge, and what part narrative plays in our understanding of human lives. He asks, further, what it would be to understand the modern condition from a neo-Aristotelian or Thomistic perspective, and argues that Thomistic Aristotelianism, informed by Marx's insights, provides us with resources for constructing a contemporary politics and ethics which both enable and require us to act against modernity from within modernity. This rich and important book builds on and advances MacIntyre's thinking in ethics and moral philosophy, and will be of great interest to readers in both fields.

  • The Palgrave Kant handbook / Matthew C. Altman, editor

  • Sociality and Normativity for Robots : Philosophical Inquiries into Human-Robot Interactions / edited by Raul Hakli, Johanna Seibt

  • Angela Carter and western philosophy / Heidi Yeandle
    This book unearths Carter's deconstruction of the male-dominated discipline of Western thought. Revealing the extensive philosophical research that underpins Carter's intertextual work, this book offers new readings of her fiction in relation to a range of philosophical texts and ideas. By re-examining Carter's writing with reference to the archived collection of her notes that has recently become available at the British Library, Angela Carter and Western Philosophy puts forward new interpretations of Carter's writing practices. With chapters examining her allusions to Plato, Hobbes and Rousseau, Descartes, Locke and Hume, Wittgenstein and Ryle, as well as Kant and Sade, this book illuminates Carter's engagement with different areas of Western thought, and discusses how this shapes her portrayal of reality, identity, civilisation, and morality. Angela Carter and Western Philosophy will be of interest to researchers, lecturers, and students working on contemporary women's writing, philosophy and literature, and intertextual literary practices. 

  • Epistemic virtues in the sciences and the humanities. Towards an Integrated history of the sciences and the humanities / jeroen van Dongen; Herman Paul

  • The radicalization of Cicero : John Toland and strategic editing in the early enlightenment / Katherine A. East
    This book uses a previously overlooked Neo-Latin treatise, Cicero Illustratus, to provide insight into the status and function of the Ciceronian tradition at the beginning of the eighteenth century, and consequently to more broadly illuminate the fate of that tradition in the early Enlightenment. Cicero Illustratus itself is the first subject for inquiry, mined for what its deliberately erudite and colorfully polemical passages of scholarly stratagems reveal about Ciceronian scholarship and the motives for exploring it within the context of early Enlightenment thought. It also includes an analysis of the role played by the Ciceronian tradition in the broader political and radical movements that existed in the Enlightenment, with particular attention paid to Cicero's unexpectedly prominent position in major political and philosophical Republican and Erastian works. The subject of this book together with the conclusions reached will provide scholars and students with crucial new material relating to the classical tradition, the history of scholarship, and the intellectual history of the early Enlightenment.

  • Hegel on philosophy in history / edited by Rachel Zuckert and James Kreines
    B 2948 H3363 2017
    In this volume honouring Robert Pippin, prominent philosophers such as John McDowell, Slavoj Zizek, Jonathan Lear, and Axel Honneth explore Hegel's proposals concerning the historical character of philosophy. Hegelian doctrines discussed include the purported end of art, Hegel's view of human history, including the history of philosophy as the history of freedom (or autonomy), and the nature of self-consciousness as realized in narrative or in action. Hegel scholars Rolf-Peter Horstmann, Sally Sedgwick, Terry Pinkard, and Paul Redding attempt to vindicate some of Hegel's claims concerning historical philosophical progress, while others such as Robert Stern, Christoph Menke, and Jay Bernstein suggest that Hegel either did not conceive of philosophy as progressing unidirectionally or did not make good on his claims to progress: perhaps we should still be Aristotelians in ethics, or perhaps we are still torn between sensibility and reason, or between individuality and social norms. Perhaps capitalism has exacerbated such problems.

  • Evolving enactivism : basic minds meet content / Daniel D. Hutto and Erik Myin
    BD 418.3 H88 2017

    An extended argument that cognitive phenomena -- perceiving, imagining, remembering -- can be best explained in terms of an interface between contentless and content-involving forms of cognition.

    Evolving Enactivism argues that cognitive phenomena -- perceiving, imagining, remembering -- can be best explained in terms of an interface between contentless and content-involving forms of cognition. Building on their earlier book Radicalizing Enactivism , which proposes that there can be forms of cognition without content, Daniel Hutto and Erik Myin demonstrate the unique explanatory advantages of recognizing that only some forms of cognition have content while others -- the most elementary ones -- do not. They offer an account of the mind in duplex terms, proposing a complex vision of mentality in which these basic contentless forms of cognition interact with content-involving ones.

    Hutto and Myin argue that the most basic forms of cognition do not, contrary to a currently popular account of cognition, involve picking up and processing information that is then used, reused, stored, and represented in the brain. Rather, basic cognition is contentless -- fundamentally interactive, dynamic, and relational. In advancing the case for a radically enactive account of cognition, Hutto and Myin propose crucial adjustments to our concept of cognition and offer theoretical support for their revolutionary rethinking, emphasizing its capacity to explain basic minds in naturalistic terms. They demonstrate the explanatory power of the duplex vision of cognition, showing how it offers powerful means for understanding quintessential cognitive phenomena without introducing scientifically intractable mysteries into the mix.

  • Dignity : a history / edited by Remy Debes
    BJ 1533 D45 D54 2017
    In everything from philosophical ethics to legal argument to public activism, it has become commonplace to appeal to the idea of human dignity. In such contexts, the concept of dignity typically signifies something like the fundamental moral status belonging to all humans. Remarkably, however, it is only in the last century that this meaning of the term has become standardized. Before this, dignity was instead a concept associated with social status. Unfortunately, this transformation remains something of a mystery in existing scholarship. Exactly when and why did "dignity" change its meaning? And before this change, was it truly the case that we lacked a conception of human worth akin to the one that "dignity" now represents? In this volume, leading scholars across a range of disciplines attempt to answer such questions by clarifying the presently murky history of "dignity," from classical Greek thought through the Middle Ages and Enlightenment to the present day.

  • The concept of presocratic philosophy : its origin, development, and significance / André Laks ; translated by Glenn W. Most
    B 187.5 L3513 2018

    When we talk about Presocratic philosophy, we are speaking about the origins of Greek philosophy and Western rationality itself. But what exactly does it mean to talk about "Presocratic philosophy" in the first place? How did early Greek thinkers come to be considered collectively as Presocratic philosophers? In this brief book, Andr#65533; Laks provides a history of the influential idea of Presocratic philosophy, tracing its historical and philosophical significance and consequences, from its ancient antecedents to its full crystallization in the modern period and its continuing effects today.

    Laks examines ancient Greek and Roman views about the birth of philosophy before turning to the eighteenth-century emergence of the term "Presocratics" and the debates about it that spanned the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He analyzes the intellectual circumstances that led to the idea of Presocratic philosophy--and what was and is at stake in the construction of the notion. The book closes by comparing two models of the history of philosophy--the phenomenological, represented by Hans-Georg Gadamer, and the rationalist, represented by Ernst Cassirer--and their implications for Presocratic philosophy, as well as other categories of philosophical history. Other figures discussed include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Diogenes Laertius, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Nietzsche, Max Weber, and J.-P. Vernant.

    Challenging standard histories of Presocratic philosophy, the book calls for a reconsideration of the conventional story of early Greek philosophy and Western rationality.

  • Radical atheism : Derrida and the time of life / Martin Hägglund
    B 2430 D484 H33 2008

    Radical Atheism presents a profound new reading of the influential French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Against the prevalent notion that there was an ethical or religious "turn" in Derrida's thinking, H#65533;gglund argues that a radical atheism informs Derrida's work from beginning to end. Proceeding from Derrida's insight into the constitution of time, H#65533;gglund demonstrates how Derrida rethinks the condition of identity, ethics, religion, and political emancipation in accordance with the logic of radical atheism. H#65533;gglund challenges other major interpreters of Derrida's work and offers a compelling account of Derrida's thinking on life and death, good and evil, self and other. Furthermore, H#65533;gglund does not only explicate Derrida's position but also develops his arguments, fortifies his logic, and pursues its implications. The result is a groundbreaking deconstruction of the perennial philosophical themes of time and desire as well as pressing contemporary issues of sovereignty and democracy.

  • Reputation : what it is and why it matters / Gloria Origgi ; translated by Stephen Holmes and Noga Arikha
    BJ 1531 O7513 2018

    A compelling exploration of how reputation affects every aspect of contemporary life

    Reputation touches almost everything, guiding our behavior and choices in countless ways. But it is also shrouded in mystery. Why is it so powerful when the criteria by which people and things are defined as good or bad often appear to be arbitrary? Why do we care so much about how others see us that we may even do irrational and harmful things to try to influence their opinion? In this engaging book, Gloria Origgi draws on philosophy, social psychology, sociology, economics, literature, and history to offer an illuminating account of an important yet oddly neglected subject.

    Origgi examines the influence of the Internet and social media, as well as the countless ranking systems that characterize modern society and contribute to the creation of formal and informal reputations in our social relations, in business, in politics, in academia, and even in wine. She highlights the importance of reputation to the effective functioning of the economy and e-commerce. Origgi also discusses the existential significance of our obsession with reputation, concluding that an awareness of the relationship between our reputation and our actions empowers us to better understand who we are and why we do what we do.

    Compellingly written and filled with surprising insights, Reputation pins down an elusive subject that affects everyone.

  • Normality : a critical genealogy / Peter Cryle and Elizabeth Stephens
    B 105 N65 C79 2017
    The concept of normal is so familiar that it can be hard to imagine contemporary life without it. Yet the term entered everyday speech only in the mid-twentieth century. Before that, it was solely a scientific term used primarily in medicine to refer to a general state of health and the orderly function of organs. But beginning in the middle of the twentieth century, normal broke out of scientific usage, becoming less precise and coming to mean a balanced condition to be maintained and an ideal to be achieved.

    In Normality , Peter Cryle and Elizabeth Stephens offer an intellectual and cultural history of what it means to be normal. They explore the history of how communities settle on any one definition of the norm, along the way analyzing a fascinating series of case studies in fields as remote as anatomy, statistics, criminal anthropology, sociology, and eugenics. Cryle and Stephens argue that since the idea of normality is so central to contemporary disability, gender, race, and sexuality studies, scholars in these fields must first have a better understanding of the context for normality. This pioneering book moves beyond binaries to explore for the first time what it does--and doesn't--mean to be normal.

  • Plotinus and the moving image / by Thorsten Botz-Bornstein, Giannis Stamatellos
    B 693 Z7 B677 2017
    Plotinus and the Moving Image offers the first philosophical discussion on Plotinus' philosophy and film. It discusses Plotinian concepts like "the One" in a cinematic context and relates Plotinus' theory of time as a transitory intelligible movement of the soul to Bergson's and Deleuze's time-image. Film is a unique medium for a rapprochement of our modern consciousness with the thought of Plotinus. The Neoplatonic vestige is particularly worth exploring in the context of the newly emerging "Cinema of Contemplation." Plotinus' search for the "intelligible" that can be grasped neither by sense perception nor by merely logical abstractions leads to a fluent way of seeing. Parallels that had so far never been discussed are made plausible. This book is a milestone in the philosophy of film. Contributors are: Cameron Barrows, Thorsten Botz-Bornstein, Michelle Phillips Buchberger, Steve Choe, Stephen Clark, Vincenzo Lomuscio, Tony Partridge, Daniel Regnier, Giannis Stamatellos, Enrico Terrone, Sebastian F. Moro Tornese and Panayiota Vassilopoulou.

  • Philosophische Versuche über die menschliche Natur und ihre Entwickelung / Johann Nikolaus Tetens ; herausgegeben von Udo Roth und Gideon Stiening
    B 2710 A5 2014

    Das Werk von 1777 zählt zu den bedeutendsten Veröffentlichungen der Philosophie der Spätaufklärung. In insgesamt 14 umfangreichen Essays versucht Tetens die Grundprobleme der Aufklärungsphilosophie zu lösen. Der Band bietet die erste vollständige und kommentierte Ausgabe dieses opus magnum der empiristischen Spätaufklärung seit der Erstpublikation.

  • Plato's Timaeus : translation, glossary, appendices and introductory essay / Peter Kalkavage
    B 387 A5 K25 2001

    This is an English translation of Plato's dialogue concerning speculation on the nature of the physical world and human beings. An extensive introduction provides careful insights to the reading of the work, the nature of Platonic dialogue and the cultural background of the Timaeus. Appendices on music, astronomy and geometry further provide guidance to the central thoughts of the dialogue. The glossary provides cross references and discussion for key words in the dialogue, functioning as springboards into the various concepts and ideas that are central to this and other Platonic dialogues and are useful starting points for any classroom discussion or personal thought.

    Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato's immediate audience.

  • Kinaesthetic knowing : aesthetics, epistemology, modern design / Zeynep Çelik Alexander
    BH 221 G3 A44 2017
    Is all knowledge the product of thought? Or can the physical interactions of the body with the world produce reliable knowledge? In late-nineteenth-century Europe, scientists, artists, and other intellectuals theorized the latter as a new way of knowing, which Zeynep #65533;elik Alexander here dubs "kinaesthetic knowing."
    In this book, Alexander offers the first major intellectual history of kinaesthetic knowing and its influence on the formation of modern art and architecture and especially modern design education. Focusing in particular on Germany and tracing the story up to the start of World War II, Alexander reveals the tension between intellectual meditation and immediate experience to be at the heart of the modern discourse of aesthetics, playing a major part in the artistic and teaching practices of numerous key figures of the period, including Heinrich W#65533;lfflin, Hermann Obrist, August Endell, L#65533;szl#65533; Moholy-Nagy, and many others. Ultimately, she shows, kinaesthetic knowing did not become the foundation of the human sciences, as some of its advocates had hoped, but it did lay the groundwork--at such institutions as the Bauhaus--for modern art and architecture in the twentieth century.

  • Time in feminist phenomenology / edited by Christina Schües, Dorothea E. Olkowski, and Helen A. Fielding
    BD 638 T564 2011

    The contributors to this international volume take up questions about a phenomenology of time that begins with and attunes to gender issues. Themes such as feminist conceptions of time, change and becoming, the body and identity, memory and modes of experience, and the relevance of time as a moral and political question, shape Time in Feminist Phenomenology and allow readers to explore connections between feminist philosophy, phenomenology, and time. With its insistence on the importance of gender experience to the experience of time, this volume is a welcome opening to new and critical thinking about being, knowledge, aesthetics, and ethics.

  • The mathematical analysis of logic : being an essay towards a calculus of deductive reasoning / by George Boole
    BC 71 B63 2015b
    George Boole was an English mathematician and logician. He worked in the fields of differential equations and algebraic logic. Boolean logic (once described as "0 and 1" logic) is credited with laying the foundations for the information age. In 1841 Boole published an influential paper in early invariant theory. He received a medal from the Royal Society for his 1844 work, On A General Method of Analysis. It was a contribution to the theory of linear differential equations, moving from the case of constant coefficients on which he had already published, to variable coefficients. In 1847 Boole published The Mathematical Analysis of Logic, the first of his works on symbolic logic.

  • Society must be defended : lectures at the Collège de France, 1975-76 / Michel Foucault ; edited by Mauro Bertani and Alessandro Fontana ; general editors, François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by David Macey
    B 2430 F723 F3813 2003
    An examination of relations between war and politics

    From 1971 until his death in 1984, Michel Foucault taught at the Collège de France, perhaps the most prestigious intellectual institution in Europe. Each year, in a series of 12 public lectures, Foucault sought to explain his research of the previous year. These lectures do not reduplicate his published books, although they do have themes in common. The lectures show Foucault ranging freely and conversationally over the implications of his research.

    In Society Must Be Defended , Foucault deals with the emergence in the early 17th century of a new understanding of society and its relation to war. War was now seen as the permanent basis of all institutions of power, a hidden presence within society that could be deciphered by an historical analysis. Tracing this development, Foucault outlines a genealogy of power/knowledge that was to become a primary concern in his final years.

  • Leibniz on causation and agency / Julia Jorati
    B 2598 J57 2017
    This book presents a comprehensive examination of Gottfried Leibniz's views on the nature of agents and their actions. Julia Jorati offers a fresh look at controversial topics including Leibniz's doctrines of teleology, the causation of spontaneous changes within substances, divine concurrence, freedom, and contingency, and also discusses widely neglected issues such as his theories of moral responsibility, control, attributability, and compulsion. Rather than focusing exclusively on human agency, she explores the activities of non-rational substances and the differences between distinctive types of actions, showing how the will, appetitions, and teleology are key to Leibniz's discussions of agency. Her book reveals that Leibniz has a nuanced and compelling philosophy of action which has relevance for present-day discussions of agency. It will be of interest to scholars and students of early modern philosophy as well as to metaphysicians and philosophers of action.

  • Philosophy, sophistry, antiphilosophy : Badiou's dispute with Lyotard / Matthew R. McLennan
    B 2430 B274 M44 2015
    Alain Badiou's work in philosophy, though daunting, has gained a receptive and steadily growing Anglophone readership. What is not well known is the extent to which Badiou's positions, vis-#65533;-vis ontology, ethics, politics and the very meaning of philosophy, were hammered out in dispute with the late Jean-Fran#65533;ois Lyotard. Matthew R. McLennan's Philosophy, Sophistry, Antiphilosophy is the first work to pose the question of the relation between Lyotard and Badiou, and in so doing constitutes a significant intervention in the field of contemporary European philosophy by revisiting one of its most influential and controversial forefathers.Badiou himself has underscored the importance of Lyotard for his own project; might the recent resurgence of interest in Lyotard be tied in some way to Badiou's comments? Or deeper still: might not Badiou's philosophical Platonism beg an encounter with philosophy's other, the figure of the sophist that Lyotard played so often and so ably? Posing pertinent questions and opening new discursive channels in the literature on these two major figures this book is of interest to those studying philosophy, rhetoric, literary theory, cultural and media studies.

  • Inclusive ethics : extending beneficence and egalitarian justice / Ingmar Persson
    BJ 1012 P4375 2017
    Inclusive Ethics begins from two ideas which are part of our everyday morality, namely that we have a moral reason to benefit or do good to other beings, and that justice requires these benefits to be distributed equally. A morality comprising these two general principles will be exceedinglyhard to apply as these principles will have to be balanced against each in an intuitive fashion, but also because the notion of what benefits beings is quite complex, comprising both experiential components of pleasure and successful exercises of autonomy.Ingmar Persson argues that, on philosophical reflection, these ideas turn out to be more far-reaching than we imagine. In particular, the reason to benefit commits us to benefit beings by bringing them into existence. Further, since grounds that are commonly used to justify that some are better offthan others - such as their being more deserving or having rights to more - are untenable, justice requires a more extensive equality. The book concludes by reflecting on the problems of getting people to accept a morality which differs markedly from the morality with which they have grownup.

  • Human dignity : a way of living / Peter Bieri ; translated by Diana Siclovan
    BJ 1533 R42 B5413 2017

    Dignity is humanity s most prized possession. We experience the loss of dignity as a terrible humiliation: when we lose our dignity we feel deprived of something without which life no longer seems worth living. But what exactly is this trait that we value so highly?

    In this important new book, distinguished philosopher Peter Bieri looks afresh at the notion of human dignity. In contrast to most traditional views, he argues that dignity is not an innate quality of human beings or a right that we possess by virtue of being human. Rather, dignity is a certain way to lead one s life. It is a pattern of thought, experience and action in other words, a way of living.

    In Bieri s account, there are three key dimensions to dignity as a way of living. The first is the way I am treated by others: they can treat me in a way that leaves my dignity intact or they can destroy my dignity. The second dimension concerns the way that I treat other people: do I treat them in a way that allows me to live a dignified life? The third dimension concerns the view that I have of myself: which ways of seeing and treating myself allow me to maintain a sense of dignity? In the actual flow of day-to-day life these three dimensions of dignity are often interwoven, and this accounts in part for the complexity of the situations and experiences in which our dignity is at stake.

    So, why did we invent dignity and what role does it play in our lives? As thinking and acting beings, our lives are fragile and constantly under threat. A dignified way of living, argues Bieri, is humanity s way of coping with this threat. In our constantly endangered lives, it is important to stand our ground with confidence. Thus a dignified way of living is not any way of living: it is a particular way of responding to the existential experience of being under threat. It is also a particular way of answering the question: What kind of life do we wish to live?

    This beautifully written reflection on our most cherished human value will be of interest to a wide readership.

  • A comparative analysis of Cicero and Aquinas : nature and the natural law / Charles P. Nemeth
    B 553 N46 2017
    In A Comparative Analysis of Cicero and Aquinas , Charles P. Nemeth investigates how, despite their differences, these two figures may be the most compatible brothers in ideas ever conceived in the theory of natural law. Looking to find common threads that run between the philosophies of these two great thinkers of the Classical and Medieval periods, this book aims to determine whether or not there exists a common ground whereby ethical debates and dilemmas can be evaluated. Does comparison between Cicero and Aquinas offer a new pathway for moral measure, based on defined and developed principles? Do they deliver certain moral and ethical principles for human life to which each agree? Instead of a polemical diatribe, comparison between Cicero and Aquinas may edify a method of compromise and afford a more or less restrictive series of judgements about ethical quandaries.

  • The Cambridge companion to ancient ethics / edited by Christopher Bobonich
    BJ 161 C363 2017
    The field of ancient Greek ethics is increasingly emerging as a major branch of philosophical enquiry, and students and scholars of ancient philosophy will find this Companion to be a rich and invaluable guide to the themes and movements which characterised the discipline from the Pre-Socratics to the Neo-Platonists. Several chapters are dedicated to the central figures of Plato and Aristotle, and others explore the ethical thought of the Stoics, the Epicureans, the Skeptics, and Plotinus. Further chapters examine important themes that cut across these schools, including virtue and happiness, friendship, elitism, impartiality, and the relationship between ancient eudaimonism and modern morality. Written by leading scholars and drawing on cutting-edge research to illuminate the questions of ancient ethics, the book will provide students and specialists with an indispensable critical overview of the full range of ancient Greek ethics.

  • Beyond the analytic-continental divide : pluralist philosophy in the twenty-first century / edited by Jeffrey A. Bell, Andrew Cutrofello, and Paul M. Livingston
    B 805 B38 2016

    This forward-thinking collection presents new work that looks beyond the division between the analytic and continental philosophical traditions#65533;one that has long caused dissension, mutual distrust, and institutional barriers to the development of common concerns and problems. Rather than rehearsing the causes of the divide, contributors draw upon the problems, methods, and results of both traditions to show what post-divide philosophical work looks like in practice.

    Ranging from metaphysics and philosophy of mind to political philosophy and ethics, the papers gathered here bring into mutual dialogue a wide range of recent and contemporary thinkers, and confront leading problems common to both traditions, including methodology, ontology, meaning, truth, values, and personhood. Collectively, these essays show that it is already possible to foresee a future for philosophical thought and practice no longer determined neither as "analytic" nor as "continental," but, instead, as a pluralistic synthesis of what is best in both traditions. The new work assembled here shows how the problems, projects, and ambitions of twentieth-century philosophy are already being taken up and productively transformed to produce new insights, questions, and methods for philosophy today.

  • Matter and memory / Henri Bergson ; authorized translation by Nancy Margaret Paul and W. Scott Palmer
    B 2430 B4 M313 1988
    A monumental work by a Nobel Prize-winner, this 1896 work represents one of the great inquiries into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Bergson surveys these independent but related spheres, exploring the connection of mind and body to individual freedom of choice.

  • The new politics of materialism : history, philosophy, science / edited by Sarah Ellenzweig and John H. Zammito
    B 825 N495 2017

    New materialism challenges the mechanistic models characteristic of early modern philosophy that regarded matter as largely passive and inert. Instead it gives weight to topics often overlooked in such accounts: agency, vitalism, complexity, contingency, and self-organization.

    This collection, which includes an international roster of contributors from philosophy, history, literature, and science, is the first to ask what is "new" about the new materialism and place it in interdisciplinary perspective. Against current theories of new materialism it argues for a deeper engagement with materialism's history, questions whether matter can be "lively," and asks whether new materialism's wish to revitalize politics and the political lives up to its promise.

    Contributors: Keith Ansell-Pearson, Sarah Ellenzweig, Christian J. Emden, N. Katherine Hayles, Jess Keiser, Mogens Laerke, Ian Lowrie, Lenny Moss, Angela Willey, Catherine Wilson, Charles T. Wolfe, Derek Woods, and John H. Zammito.

  • Postmetaphysical thinking. Jürgen Habermas ; translated by Ciaran Cronin
    B 3258 H323 N33313 2017

    'There is no alternative to postmetaphysical thinking': this statement, made by J#65533;rgen Habermas in 1988, has lost none of its relevance. Postmetaphysical thinking is, in the first place, the historical answer to the crisis of metaphysics following Hegel, when the central metaphysical figures of thought began to totter under the pressure exerted by social developments and by developments within science. As a result, philosophy's epistemological privilege was shaken to its core, its basic concepts were de-transcendentalized, and the primacy of theory over practice was opened to question. For good reasons, philosophy 'lost its extraordinary status', but as a result it also courted new problems. In Postmetaphysical Thinking II , the sequel to the 1988 volume that bears the same title (English translation, Polity 1992), Habermas addresses some of these problems.

    The first section of the book deals with the shift in perspective from metaphysical worldviews to the lifeworld, the unarticulated meanings and assumptions that accompany everyday thought and action in the mode of 'background knowledge'. Habermas analyses the lifeworld as a 'space of reasons' - even where language is not (yet) involved, such as, for example, in gestural communication and rituals. In the second section, the uneasy relationship between religion and postmetaphysical thinking takes centre stage. Habermas picks up where he left off in 1988, when he made the far-sighted observation that 'philosophy, even in its postmetaphysical form, will be able neither to replace nor to repress religion', and explores philosophy's new-found interest in religion, among other topics. The final section includes essays on the role of religion in the political context of a post-secular, liberal society.

    This volume will be of great interest to students and scholars in philosophy, religion and the social sciences and humanities generally.

  • Normativity and power : analyzing social orders of justification / Rainer Forst ; translated by Ciaran Cronin
    BJ 1458.3 F6713 2017
    Humans are justificatory beings - they offer, demand, and require justifications. The rules and institutions they follow rest on justification narratives that have evolved over time and, taken together, constitute a dynamic and tension-laden normative order. In this collection of essays, the first translation into English of the ground-breaking Normativitat und Macht (Suhrkamp 2015), Rainer Forst presents a new approach to critical theory. Each essay reflects on the basic principles that guide our normative thinking. Forst's argument goes beyond "ideal"and "realist" theories and shows how closely the concepts of normativity and power are interrelated, and how power rests on the capacity to influence, determine, and possibly restrict the space of justifications for others. By combining insights from the disciplines of philosophy, history, and thesocial sciences, Forst revaluates theories of justice, as well as of power, and provides the tools for a critical theory of relations of justification.

  • Routledge encyclopedia of philosophy CD-ROM / general editor, Edward Craig ; consultant editor, Luciano Floridi
    B 51 R68 1998 CD-ROM

  • The metaphysical principles of virtue : part II of The metaphysics of morals / Immanuel Kant ; translated by James Ellington, with an introduction by Warner Wick
    B 2785 E5 E55 1964
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