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Religion - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range BL - BX (Religion) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • New directions in spiritual kinship : sacred ties across the Abrahamic religions / Todne Thomas, Asiya Malik, Rose Wellman, editors
    BL 410 N48 2017eb
    This volume examines the significance of spiritual kinship--or kinship reckoned in relation to the divine--in creating myriad forms of affiliations among Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Rather than confining the study of spiritual kinship to Christian godparenthood or presuming its disappearance in light of secularism, the authors investigate how religious practitioners create and contest sacred solidarities through ritual, discursive, and ethical practices across social domains, networks, and transnational collectives. This book's theoretical conversations and rich case studies hold value for scholars of anthropology, kinship, and religion.

  • Religion, education and human rights : theoretical and empirical perspectives / Anders Sjöberg, Hans-Georg Ziebertz, editors
    BV1471.3

  • The secular landscape : the decline of religion in America / Kevin McCaffree
    BL2747

  • Parenting as spiritual practice and source for theology : mothering matters / editors, Claire Bischoff, Elizabeth O'Donnell Gandolfo, Annie Hardison-Moody ; with foreword by Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore
    BT83.55

  • Qur'anic guidance for good governance : a contemporary perspective / Abdullad al-Ahsan, Stephen B. Young, editors
    BP134.P6

  • Representing Irish religious histories : historiography, ideology and practice / Jacqueline Hill and Mary Annlyons, editors
    BL980.I7

    This collection begins on the premise that, until recently, religion has been particularly influential in Ireland in forming a sense of identity, and in creating certain versions of reality. History has also been a key component in that process, and the historical evolution of Christianity has been appropriated by the main religious denominations - Catholic, Church of Ireland, and Presbyterian - with a view to reinforcing their own identities. This book explores the ways in which this occurred; the writing of religious history, and some of the manifestations of that process, forms key parts of the collection. Also included are chapters discussing current and recent attempts to examine the legacy of collective religious memory - notably in Northern Ireland - based on projects designed to encourage reflection about the religious past among both adults and school-children. Readers will find this collection particularly timely in view of the current 'decade of commemorations'.


  • The gospel of Matthew : a socio-rhetorical commentary / Craig S. Keener
    BS 2575.3 K43 2009
    "It is a special pleasure to introduce R. T. (Dick) France's commentary to the pastoral and scholarly community, who should find it a truly exceptional -- and helpful -- volume." So says Gordon Fee in his preface to this work. France's masterful commentary on Matthew focuses on exegesis of Matthew's text as it stands rather than on the prehistory of the material or details of Synoptic comparison. The exegesis of each section is part of a planned literary whole supplemented, rather than controlled, by verse-by-verse commentary, allowing the text as a complete story to come into brilliant focus.

    Rather than being a "commentary on commentaries,"  The Gospel of Matthew  is concerned throughout with what Matthew himself meant to convey about Jesus and how he set about doing so within the cultural and historical context of first-century Palestine. France frequently draws attention to the distinctive nature of the province of Galilee and the social dynamics involved when a Galilean prophet presents himself in Jerusalem as the Messiah.

    The English translation at the beginning of each section is France's own, designed to provide the basis for the commentary. This adept translation uses contemporary idioms and, where necessary, gives priority to clarity over literary elegance.

    Amid the wide array of Matthew commentaries available today, France's world-class stature, his clear focus on Matthew and Jesus, his careful methodology, and his user-friendly style promise to make this volume an enduring standard for years to come.

  • Handbook of religion and the authority of science / edited by James R. Lewis and Olav Hammer
    BL 240.3 H357 2011
    There has been a significant but little-noticed aspect of the interface between science and religion, namely the widespread tendency of religions to appeal to science in support of their truth claims. Though the appeal to science is most evident in more recent religions like Christian Science and Scientology, no major faith tradition is exempt from this pattern. Members of almost every religion desire to see their 'truths' supported by the authority of science - especially in the midst of the present historical period, when all of the comforting old certainties seem problematic and threatened. The present collection examines this pattern in a wide variety of different religions and spiritual movements, and demonstrates the many different ways in which religions appeal to the authority of science. The result is a wide-ranging and uniquely compelling study of how religions adapt their message to one of the major challenges presented by the contemporary world.

  • Beyond the self : conversations between Buddhism and neuroscience / Matthieu Ricard and Wolf Singer
    BQ 4570 N48 R5313 2017

    Converging and diverging views on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, perception, meditation, and other topics.

    Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically; it has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation. In this book, Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk trained as a molecular biologist, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished neuroscientist -- close friends, continuing an ongoing dialogue -- offer their perspectives on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, epistemology, meditation, and neuroplasticity.

    Ricard and Singer's wide-ranging conversation stages an enlightening and engaging encounter between Buddhism's wealth of experiential findings and neuroscience's abundance of experimental results. They discuss, among many other things, the difference between rumination and meditation (rumination is the scourge of meditation, but psychotherapy depends on it); the distinction between pure awareness and its contents; the Buddhist idea (or lack of one) of the unconscious and neuroscience's precise criteria for conscious and unconscious processes; and the commonalities between cognitive behavioral therapy and meditation. Their views diverge (Ricard asserts that the third-person approach will never encounter consciousness as a primary experience) and converge (Singer points out that the neuroscientific understanding of perception as reconstruction is very like the Buddhist all-discriminating wisdom) but both keep their vision trained on understanding fundamental aspects of human life.


  • Powers of distinction : on religion and modernity / Nancy Levene
    BL 51 L477 2017
    In this major new work, philosopher of religion Nancy Levene examines the elemental character of religion and modernity. Deep in their operating systems, she argues, are dualisms of opposition and identity that cannot be reconciled with the forms of life they ostensibly support. These dualisms are dead ends, but they conceal a richer position--another kind of dualism constitutive of mutual relation. This dualism is difficult to distinguish and its concept of relation difficult to commit to. It risks contention and even violence. But it is also the indispensable support for modernity's most innovative ideals: democracy, criticism, and interpretation.

    In readings from Abraham to the present, Levene recovers this richer dualism in its difference from the alternatives--other dualisms, nondualism, multiplication. From Abraham we get the biblical call to give up tribal belonging for a promised land of covenantal relation. Yet modernity, inclusive of this call, is also the principle that critiques the promise when it divides self from other, us from them.

    Drawing on a long tradition of thinkers and scholars even as she breaks new ground, Levene offers here nothing less than a new way of understanding modernity as an ethical claim about our world, a philosophy of the powers of distinction to include rather than to divide.

  • Oduduwa's chain : locations of culture in the Yoruba-Atlantic / Andrew Apter
    BL 2480 Y6 A78 2018
    Yoruba culture has been a part of the Americas for centuries, brought from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade and maintained in various forms ever since. In Oduduwa's Chain , Andrew Apter explores a wide range of fascinating historical and ethnographic examples and offers a provocative rethinking of African heritage in Black Atlantic Studies.

    Focusing on Yoruba history and culture in Nigeria, Apter applies a generative model of cultural revision that allows him to identify formative Yoruba influences without resorting to the idea that culture and tradition are fixed. For example, Apter shows how the association of African gods with Catholic saints can be seen as a strategy of empowerment, explores historical locations of Yoruba gender ideologies and their variations in the Atlantic world, and much more. He concludes with a rousing call for a return to Africa in studies of the Black Atlantic, resurrecting a critical notion of culture that allows us to transcend Western inventions of African while taking them into account.

  • Image and presence : a Christological reflection on iconoclasm and iconophilia / Natalie Carnes
    BT 590 I3 C37 2017

    Images increasingly saturate our world, making present to us what is distant or obscure. Yet the power of images also arises from what they do not make present--from a type of absence they do not dispel. Joining a growing multidisciplinary conversation that rejects an understanding of images as lifeless objects, this book offers a theological meditation on the ways images convey presence into our world. Just as Christ negates himself in order to manifest the invisible God, images, Natalie Carnes contends, negate themselves to give more than they literally or materially are. Her Christological reflections bring iconoclasm and iconophilia into productive relation, suggesting that they need not oppose one another.

    Investigating such images as the biblical golden calf and paintings of the Virgin Mary, Carnes explores how to distinguish between iconoclasms that maintain fidelity to their theological intentions and those that lead to visual temptation. Offering ecumenical reflections on issues that have long divided Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions, Image and Presence provokes a fundamental reconsideration of images and of the global image crises of our time.


  • Hasidism : a new history / David Biale, David Assaf, Benjamin Brown, Uriel Gellman, Samuel C. Heilman, Moshe Rosman, Gadi Sagiv, and Marcin Wodzinski ; with an afterword by Arthur Green
    BM 198.3 B53 2018

    The first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism

    This is the first comprehensive history of the pietistic movement that shaped modern Judaism. The book's unique blend of intellectual, religious, and social history offers perspectives on the movement's leaders as well as its followers, and demonstrates that, far from being a throwback to the Middle Ages, Hasidism is a product of modernity that forged its identity as a radical alternative to the secular world.

    Hasidism originated in southeastern Poland, in mystical circles centered on the figure of Israel Ba'al Shem Tov, but it was only after his death in 1760 that a movement began to spread. Challenging the notion that Hasidism ceased to be a creative movement after the eighteenth century, this book argues that its first golden age was in the nineteenth century, when it conquered new territory, won a mass following, and became a mainstay of Jewish Orthodoxy. World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the Holocaust decimated eastern European Hasidism. But following World War II, the movement enjoyed a second golden age, growing exponentially. Today, it is witnessing a remarkable renaissance in Israel, the United States, and other countries around the world.

    Written by an international team of scholars, Hasidism is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand this vibrant and influential modern Jewish movement.


  • Christianizing Egypt : syncretism and local worlds in late antiquity / David Frankfurter
    BL 2455 F725 2018

    How does a culture become Christian, especially one that is heir to such ancient traditions and spectacular monuments as Egypt? This book offers a new model for envisioning the process of Christianization by looking at the construction of Christianity in the various social and creative worlds active in Egyptian culture during late antiquity.

    As David Frankfurter shows, members of these different social and creative worlds came to create different forms of Christianity according to their specific interests, their traditional idioms, and their sense of what the religion could offer. Reintroducing the term "syncretism" for the inevitable and continuous process by which a religion is acculturated, the book addresses the various formations of Egyptian Christianity that developed in the domestic sphere, the worlds of holy men and saints' shrines, the work of craftsmen and artisans, the culture of monastic scribes, and the reimagination of the landscape itself, through processions, architecture, and the potent remains of the past.

    Drawing on sermons and magical texts, saints' lives and figurines, letters and amulets, and comparisons with Christianization elsewhere in the Roman empire and beyond, Christianizing Egypt reconceives religious change--from the "conversion" of hearts and minds to the selective incorporation and application of strategies for protection, authority, and efficacy, and for imagining the environment.


  • Dream trippers : global Daoism and the predicament of modern spirituality / David A. Palmer and Elijah Siegler
    BL 1923 P35 2017
    Over the past few decades, Daoism has become a recognizable part of Western "alternative" spiritual life. Now, that Westernized version of Daoism is going full circle, traveling back from America and Europe to influence Daoism in China.

    Dream Trippers draws on more than a decade of ethnographic work with Daoist monks and Western seekers to trace the spread of Westernized Daoism in contemporary China. David A. Palmer and Elijah Siegler take us into the daily life of the monastic community atop the mountain of Huashan and explore its relationship to the socialist state. They follow the international circuit of Daoist "energy tourism," which connects a number of sites throughout China, and examine the controversies around Western scholars who become practitioners and promoters of Daoism. Throughout are lively portrayals of encounters among the book's various characters--Chinese hermits and monks, Western seekers, and scholar-practitioners--as they interact with each other in obtuse, often humorous, and yet sometimes enlightening and transformative ways. Dream Trippers untangles the anxieties, confusions, and ambiguities that arise as Chinese and American practitioners balance cosmological attunement and radical spiritual individualism in their search for authenticity in a globalized world.

  • Becoming better Muslims : religious authority and ethical improvement in Aceh, Indonesia / David Kloos
    BP 63 I52 N365 2018

    How do ordinary Muslims deal with and influence the increasingly pervasive Islamic norms set by institutions of the state and religion? Becoming Better Muslims offers an innovative account of the dynamic interactions between individual Muslims, religious authorities, and the state in Aceh, Indonesia. Relying on extensive historical and ethnographic research, David Kloos offers a detailed analysis of religious life in Aceh and an investigation into today's personal processes of ethical formation.

    Aceh is known for its history of rebellion and its recent implementation of Islamic law. Debunking the stereotypical image of the Acehnese as inherently pious or fanatical, Kloos shows how Acehnese Muslims reflect consciously on their faith and often frame their religious lives in terms of gradual ethical improvement. Revealing that most Muslims view their lives through the prism of uncertainty, doubt, and imperfection, he argues that these senses of failure contribute strongly to how individuals try to become better Muslims. He also demonstrates that while religious authorities have encroached on believers and local communities, constraining them in their beliefs and practices, the same process has enabled ordinary Muslims to reflect on moral choices and dilemmas, and to shape the ways religious norms are enforced.

    Arguing that Islamic norms are carried out through daily negotiations and contestations rather than blind conformity, Becoming Better Muslims examines how ordinary people develop and exercise their religious agency.


  • Secret body : erotic and esoteric currents in the history of religions / Jeffrey J. Kripal
    BL 65 S4 K75 2017
    Over the course of his twenty-five-year career, Jeffrey J. Kripal's study of religion has had two major areas of focus: the erotic expression of mystical experience and the rise of the paranormal in American culture. This book brings these two halves together in surprising ways through a blend of memoir, manifesto, and anthology, drawing new connections between these two realms of human experience and revealing Kripal's body of work to be a dynamic whole that has the potential to renew and reshape the study of religion.
    Kripal tells his story, biographically, historically and politically contextualizing each of the six books of his Chicago corpus, from Kali's Child to Mutants and Mystics , all the while answering his censors and critics and exploring new implications of his thought. In the process, he begins to sketch out a speculative "new comparativism" in twenty theses. The result is a new vision for the study of religion, one that takes in the best of the past, engages with outside critiques from the sciences and the humanities, and begins to blaze a new positive path forward. A major work decades in the making, Secret Body will become a landmark in the study of religion.

  • Catechisms and women's writing in seventeenth-century England / Paula McQuade
    BT 1031.3 M368 2017
    Catechisms and Women's Writing in Seventeenth-Century England is a study of early modern women's literary use of catechizing. Paula McQuade examines original works composed by women - both in manuscript and print, as well as women's copying and redacting of catechisms - and construction of these materials from other sources. By studying female catechists, McQuade shows how early modern women used the power and authority granted to them as mothers to teach religious doctrine, to demonstrate their linguistic skills, to engage sympathetically with Catholic devotional texts, and to comment on matters of contemporary religious and political import - activities that many scholars have considered the sole prerogative of clergymen. This book addresses the question of women's literary production in early modern England, demonstrating that reading and writing of catechisms were crucial sites of women's literary engagements during this time.

  • Ceremonies et coutumes religieuses des peuples idolatres representées par des figures dessinées de la main de Bernard Picart: : avec une explication historique & quelques dissertations curieuses. ..
    BL75 ǂb .C39

  • Veil / Rafia Zakaria
    BP 190.5 H44 Z35 2017
    Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things. The veil can be an instrument of feminist empowerment, and veiled anonymity can confer power to women. Starting from her own marriage ceremony at which she first wore a full veil, Rafia Zakaria examines how veils do more than they get credit for. Part memoir and part philosophical investigation, Veil questions that what is seen is always good and free, and that what is veiled can only signal servility and subterfuge. From personal encounters with the veil in France (where it is banned) to Iran (where it is compulsory), Zakaria shows how the garment's reputation as a pre-modern relic is fraught and up for grabs. The veil is an object in constant transformation, whose myriad meanings challenge the absolute truths of patriarchy. Object Lessons is published in partnership with an essay series in The Atlantic.

  • An Islamic worldview from Turkey : religion in a modern, secular and democratic state / John Valk, Halis Albayrak, Mualla Selçuk
    BP63.T8

  • Secularization a essay in normative metaphysics / Ulrich Steinvorth
    BT83.7

  • Sikhism : with 64 figures / Arvind-Pal Singh Mandair
    BL2017

  • The sources of secularism : enlightenment and beyond / Anna Tomaszewska, Hasse Hämäläinen, editors
    BL2747.8

  • The Psychology of Buddhism in Conflict Studies / by Padmasiri de Silva
    BQ4570.P76

  • Buddhism / Damien Keown
    BQ 4022 K458 2009
    From its origins in India over two millennia ago, Buddhism spread throughout Asia and the world. This far-reaching and accessible introduction explains how Buddhism began, developed into its present-day form, and evolved in the West--where it now exerts increasing cultural influence. Complete with maps, diagrams, and illustrations, Buddhism provides detailed coverage of key topics such as karma, rebirth, meditation, and ethics, along with the distinguishing features of the main schools.

     


  • First Corinthians / Raymond F. Collins ; Daniel J. Harrington, editor
    BS 2675.3 C645 1999

    2000 Catholic Press Association Award Winner!

    One of the most exciting of Paul's letters, 1 Corinthians offers a vantage point from which modern readers can reflect on diverseness in Christian Churches today. In First Corinthians , Raymond Collins explores that vantage point as well as the challenge Paul posed to the people of his time - and continues to pose in ours - to allow the gospel message to engage them in their daily lives.

    Pal introduces us to a flesh-and-blood community whose humanness was al too apparent. Sex, death, and money were among the issues they had to face. Social conflicts and tension within their Christian community were part of their daily lives. Paul uses al of his diplomacy, rhetorical skill, and authority to exhort the Corinthian community to be as one in Christ.

    In examining Paul's message and method, Collins approaches 1 Corinthians as a Hellenistic letter written to people dealing with real issues in the Hellenistic world. He cites existing Hellenistic letters to show that Paul was truly a letter writer of his own times. Collins makes frequent references to the writings of the philosophic moralists to help clarify the way in which Paul spoke to his beloved Corinthians. He also comments on some aspects of the social circumstances in which the Christians of Corinth actually lived.

    Chapters are Introduction"; *Translation, Interpretation, Notes - ; *Body of the Letter - ; *Indexes. -

    Raymond Collins, PhD is a priest of the Diocese of Providence and is the dean of the School of Religious Studies at The Catholic University of America. He is the author of John and His Witness and Divorce in the New Testament published by The Liturgical Press.

    "

  • How do we know? : understanding in science and theology / editors, Dirk Evers, Antje Jackelén, Taede Smedes
    BL 240.3 H69 2010
    A study on the relationship between science and theology with respect to epistemological differences between religious belief and scientific knowledge.

  • Images of rebirth : cognitive poetics and transformational soteriology in the Gospel of Philip and the Exegesis on the Soul / by Hugo Lundhaug
    BS 2860 P67 L86 2010
    This book employs Cognitive Literary Theory in an analysis of Conceptual and Intertextual Blending in the Gospel of Philip and the Exegesis on the Soul, read as Christian texts contemporary with the production and use of the Nag Hammadi Codices.

  • L'Interprétation de la gnose : NH XI, 1 / par Wolf-Peter Funk, Louis Painchaud, Einar Thomassen
    BT 1391 F955 2010
    On s'est plu a imaginer les auteurs gnostiques comme des solitaires misanthropes et leurs uvres, comme le resultat d'un prurit d'ecrire cause par leur haine du monde et des hommes. L'Interpretation de la gnose revele un auteur soucieux de la vie d'une communaute aux prises avec des divisions nees, du moins a ses yeux, de la jalousie. Dans le but de remedier a cette situation, il cherche a persuader son destinataire de la necessite de supporter les epreuves comme le Christ crucifie l'a fait. Il lui propose comme modele a imiter la patience de celui-ci devant le mepris et les moqueries dont il a ete l'objet, lui explique que les divisions dans la communaute sont l'uvre des archontes mauvais. Il reprend l'image paulinienne de l'Eglise corps du Christ et la tradition greco-romaine des discours de reconciliation, utilisant cette image pour exhorter son destinataire, peut-etre une femme si l'on en juge par l'emploi d'exemples mettant en scene des figures feminines dans la premiere partie de l'uvre, a se satisfaire de la place qui est la sienne dans la communaute. L'Interpretation de la gnose, le commentaire le montre, est vraisemblablement le produit d'un milieu valentinien ou influence par le valentinisme. Son caractere gnostique, dont le titre a lui seul ne constitue pas une preuve, est donc indeniable. Cet ecrit est a ranger, a cote d'autres textes gnostiques, parmi les ecrits de circonstances: l'Hypostase des archontes, dont l'auteur, qui y reprend un materiau gnostique traditionnel, s'evertue a rassurer son destinataire - peut-etre une femme ici aussi, representee dans le texte par Norea -, en lui demontrant que les archontes ne peuvent rien contre lui; l'Evangile de Judas et le Temoignage veritable qui, s'inscrivant dans une longue tradition biblique et extra-biblique du refus des sacrifices sanglants, prennent position contre une theologie sacrificielle exaltant le martyre et proposent plutot a leurs destinataires une legitimation theologique de son refus.

  • Religion and the challenges of science / edited by William Sweet and Richard Feist
    BL 241 R363 2007
    Does science pose a challenge to religion and religious belief? This question has been a matter of long-standing debate - and it continues to concern not only scholars in philosophy, theology, and the sciences, but also those involved in public educational policy. This volume provides background to the current 'science and religion' debate, yet focuses as well on themes where recent discussion of the relation between science and religion has been particularly concentrated. The first theme deals with the history of the interrelation of science and religion. The second and third themes deal with the implications of recent work in cosmology, biology and so-called intelligent design for religion and religious belief. The fourth theme is concerned with 'conceptual issues' underlying, or implied, in the current debates, such as: Are scientific naturalism and religion compatible? Are science and religion bodies of knowledge or practices or both? Do religion and science offer conflicting truth claims? By illuminating contemporary discussion in the science-religion debate and by outlining the options available in describing the relation between the two, this volume will be of interest to scholars and to members of the educated public alike.

  • The war of the Jesus and Darwin fishes : religion and science in the postmodern world / John C. Caiazza
    BL 240.3 C334 2007

    This volume's title stems from an observable and seemingly amusing phenomenon--the placement of fish symbols on the rear of automobiles. There are two kinds: one a fish outline with a cross, exhibited by Christians; the other a fish outline filled with the word "evolution," with little legs attached underneath. These symbols manifest the cultural war between religion and science, a clash that draws from nineteenth-century conflicts over evolution roots in the Enlightenment.

    Today's cultural environment is a result of the internationalization of communication, labor, money, and commerce. This global culture emphasizes tolerance and acceptance of all peoples and traditions, but it also demands a moral and intellectual relativism that rejects "master narratives," including religious tradition as well as scientific theory. In some respects, the postmodern environment is caused by science itself, by the development of postmodern science, its nineteenth-century adversarial stance toward religion now somewhat softened. Among new developments are the historical understanding of science, renewed appreciation of the troubled careers of scientists, and "God" talk among physicists and psychologists. Both science and religion are being overwhelmed by new levels of technology, which is becoming the premier element of contemporary culture.

    The conflict between science and religion is being resolved in the form of a dynamic. Religion and science are both ways of giving moral and intellectual order to the universe, enabling mankind to cope with a chaotic universe and live well. Both religious critics and scientific researchers have attacked and analyzed pornography, which has become a prominent characteristic of our culture. Both share contemporary sensitivity to individual opinions and protection of the individual from social control. Both science and religion share a sense that postmodern culture lacks structure. Caiazza shows how renewed attention to religious and scientific insights can resolve longstanding conflicts, providing postmodern society with a vision of tolerable order.


  • The servant-ethic in the New Testament / Philippa Carter
    BT 38.4 C38 1999
    Uses "servant-ethic"--the understanding of oneself as a servant of others and consistently placing others' interests first--to demonstrate that a degree of ethical uniformity pervades the earliest Christian literature extant, thereby constituting a fundamental part of the earliest Christian kerygma. Begins with an introduction, followed by chapters that discuss the servant-ethic in the Synoptic gospels, Johannine writings, letters of Paul, and in other New Testament writings. No index. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

  • Torah ethics and early Christian identity / edited by Susan J. Wendel and David M. Miller
    BS 680 E84 T67 2016
    Thirteen experts here explore the relationship between the Mosaic law and early Christian ethics, examining early Christian appropriation of the Torah and looking at ways in which the law continued to serve as an ethical reference point for Christ-believers -- regardless of whether they thought Torah observance was essential or not.These noteworthy essays compare differences in interpretation and application of the law between Christians and non-Christian Jews, investigate ways in which Torah-inspired ethical practices helped Christ-believing communities articulate their distinct identities and social responsibilities, and look at how presentations of the law in early Christian literature might inform contemporary Christian social and ethical practices.Posing a unified set of questions to a diverse range of texts, Torah Ethics and Early Christian Identity will stimulate new thinking about a complex phenomenon commonly overlooked by scholars and church leaders alike.

  • Pedagogy in ancient Judaism and early Christianity / edited by Karina Martin Hogan, Matthew Goff, and Emma Wasserman
    BS 1199 E38 P43 2017

    There is little direct evidence for formal education in the Bible and in the texts of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity. At the same time, pedagogy and character formation are important themes in many of these texts. This book explores the pedagogical purpose of wisdom literature, in which the concept of discipline (Hebrew musar) is closely tied to the acquisition of wisdom. It examines how and why the concept of musar came to be translated as paideia (education, enculturation) in the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (Septuagint), and how the concept of paideia was deployed by ancient Jewish authors writing in Greek. The different understandings of paideia in wisdom and apocalyptic writings of Second Temple Judaism are this book's primary focus. It also examines how early Christians adapted the concept of paideia, influenced by both the Septuagint and Greco-Roman understandings of this concept.


  • Johannine ethics : the moral world of the Gospel and Epistles of John / Sherri Brown and Christopher W. Skinner, editors
    BS 2601 J64 2017
    The Gospel and Epistles of John are often overlooked in discussions of New Testament ethics; indeed, it has been asserted that the Fourth Gospel is of only limited value to such discussions--even that John is practically devoid of ethical material. Representing a range of viewpoints, the essays collected here by prominent scholars reveal the surprising relevance and importance of the Johannine literature by examining the explicit imperatives and the values implicit in the Gospel narrative and epistles. The introduction sets out four major approaches to Johannine ethics today. Essays in subsequent sections evaluate the directives of the Johannine Jesus (believe, love, follow), tease out the implicit ethics of the Gospel's narrative (including its fraught and apparently sectarian representation of hoi Ioudaioi as Jesus's opponents), and propose different approaches for advancing the discussion of Johannine ethics beyond the categories now dominant in critical scholarship. In a concluding essay, the editors take stock of the book's wide-ranging discussion and suggest prospects for future study. The sum is a valuable resource for the student as well as the scholar interested in the question of Johannine ethics.

  • The Bible and Catholic theological ethics / edited by Yiu Sing Lúcás Chan, James F. Keenan, Ronaldo Zacharias
    BS 680 E84 B49 2017
    In this first original collection of essays on Catholic Biblical Ethics ever done in English, renowned Jesuit moral theologian James Keenan brings together distinct voices from numerous cultures and language groups. The result is a volume representing a truly global community of Catholic ethics scholars. The Bible and Catholic Theological Ethics deepens contemporary understandings of the relationship between the Holy Bible and the world of Catholic ethical reflection. Like the four other books in the prestigious CTEWC Series, this volume aims at offering a more systematic, comprehensive, and global perspective than typical Anglo-centric or North American-focused offerings.

  • Eighteenth-century dissent and Cambridge Platonism : reconceiving the philosophy of religion / Louise Hickman
    BX 5203.3 H53 2017

    Eighteenth-Century Dissent and Cambridge Platonism identifies an ethically and politically engaged philosophy of religion in eighteenth century Rational Dissent, particularly in the work of Richard Price (1723-1791), and in the radical thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. It traces their ethico-political account of reason, natural theology and human freedom back to seventeenth century Cambridge Platonism and thereby shows how popular histories of the philosophy of religion in modernity have been over-determined both by analytic philosophy of religion and by its critics. The eighteenth century has typically been portrayed as an age of reason, defined as a project of rationalism, liberalism and increasing secularisation, leading inevitably to nihilism and the collapse of modernity. Within this narrative, the Rational Dissenters have been accused of being the culmination of eighteenth-century rationalism in Britain, epitomising the philosophy of modernity. This book challenges this reading of history by highlighting the importance of teleology, deiformity, the immutability of goodness and the divinity of reason within the tradition of Rational Dissent, and it demonstrates that the philosophy and ethics of both Price and Wollstonecraft are profoundly theological. Price#65533;s philosophy of political liberty, and Wollstonecraft#65533;s feminism, both grounded in a Platonic conception of freedom, are perfectionist and radical rather than liberal. This has important implications for understanding the political nature of eighteenth-century philosophical theology: these thinkers represent not so much a shaking off of religion by secular rationality but a challenge to religious and political hegemony. By distinguishing Price and Wollstonecraft from other forms of rationalism including deism and Socinianism, this book takes issue with the popular division of eighteenth-century philosophy into rationalistic and empirical strands and, through considering the legacy of Cambridge Platonism, draws attention to an alternative philosophy of religion that lies between both empiricism and discursive inference.


  • The practice of pastoral care : a postmodern approach / Carrie Doehring
    BV 4011.3 D64 2015

    The Practice of Pastoral Care has become a popular seminary textbook for courses in pastoral care and a manual for clinical pastoral education. In it, Doehring encourages counselors to view their ministry through a trifocal lens that incorporates premodern, modern, and postmodern approaches to religious and psychological knowledge. Doehring describes the basic ingredients of a caregiving relationship, shows how to use the caregiver's life experience as a source of authority, and demonstrates how to develop the skill of listening and establishing the actual relationship. This new edition elaborates on and expands the author's previous work, adding an intercultural perspective that gives more attention to religious pluralism in the pastoral care setting. It offers a road map for using a step-by-step narrative, relational, embodied approach to spiritual care that respects the unique ways people live out their values and beliefs, especially in coping with stress, loss, and violence. Readers will be able to confidently and professionally offer pastoral care and counseling to members of their congregations or other places of ministry.


  • Inside the Muslim Brotherhood : religion, identity, and politics / Khalil al-Anani
    BP 10 J383 A53 2016
    Over the past three decades, through rises and falls in power, regime repression and exclusion, the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood has endured, proving more resilient than any other Islamist movement in the world. In this book Khalil al-Anani explores the factors that have enabled the Brotherhood to survive so long within an ever-changing political landscape.

    Inside the Muslim Brotherhood unpacks the principal factors that shape the movement's identity, organization, and activism. Investigating the processes of socialization, indoctrination, recruitment, identification, networking, and mobilization that characterize the movement, al-Anani argues that the Brotherhood is not merely a political actor seeking power but an identity-maker that aims to change societal values, norms, and morals to line up with its ideology and worldview. The Brotherhood is involved in an intensive process of meaning construction and symbolic production that shapes individuals' identity and gives sense to their lives. The result is a distinctive code of identity that binds members together, maintains their activism, and guides their behavior in everyday life. Al-Anani attributes the Brotherhood's longevity to its tight-knit structure coupled with a complex membership system that has helped them resist regime penetration. The book also explores the divisions and differences within the movement and how these affect its strategy and decisions.

    The culmination of over a decade of research and interviews with leaders and members of the movement, this book challenges the dominant narratives about Islamists and Islamism as a whole.

  • Christianopolis : an ideal of the 17th century / Johann Valentin Andreae ; Felix Emil Held, translator
    BT 738 A4713 2007
    Pondering the characteristics of Utopias and constructing theoretical examples of them has been an intellectual exercise to thrill thinkers at least since the time of Plato's Republic. Christianopolis is the little known Utopia created by German theologian and scholar JOHANN VALENTIN ANDREAE (1586-1654). A mysterious figure associated with alchemy, Kabbalah, Rosicrucianism, and other philosophical esoterica of the 17th century, Andreae published this intriguing guide to his "perfect" society in 1618. Informed by a rigid brand of Christian socialism, Christianopolis also features a high regard for teachers, and approaches the world from both a scientific and artistic perspective. Translated in 1916 from the original Latin by University of Miami, Ohio, professor of German FELIX EMIL HELD (1880-1944), who rounds out the volume with an extensive historical introduction, this is a highly readable work that will enthrall students of philosophy, classic literature, sociology, and metaphysics.

  • An introduction to the Bible / Robert Kugler and Patrick Hartin
    BS 475.3 K84 2009
    Many current Bible "intro" volumes focus more on theories about the biblical text than on the text itself. They lack the simplicity that has become increasingly crucial as basic biblical literacy has declined. Robert Kugler and Patrick Hartin seek to remedy that problem by turning readers back to the text at hand. Their Introduction to the Bible surveys the content of all the biblical books, section by section, focusing on the Bible's theological themes.

  • Divine liturgies-- human problems in Byzantium, Armenia, Syria, and Palestine / Robert F. Taft
    BX 127 T34 2001
    In obedience to Jesus' command, 'Do this in remembrance of me', the ritual repetition of the Lord's Supper down through the ages and across multiple Christian cultures in the liturgies of East and West, has given rise, inevitably, to innumerable diversities of shape, text, cultural context, and theological interpretation, as well as to debates, sometimes heated, among modern experts as to the methodologies for resolving the problems arising from these differences. The problems of cultural history, structural, historical, and textual reconstruction, theological interpretation, and method involved in the modern scholarly debate on these issues, are the object of the studies in this volume, dedicated to the liturgies of Byzantium, Armenia, Syria, and Palestine.

  • Liturgical calendars, saints, and services in medieval England / Richard W. Pfaff
    BV 193 G7 P43 1998
    This book includes four hitherto unpublished papers together with a substantial introductory historiographical and bibliographical overview. Many of the studies concern the liturgical views of figures like Lanfranc, St Hugh of Lincoln, and William of Malmesbury (an edition of William#65533;s Abbreviatio Amalarii is included) and the ways Thomas Becket and the Venerable Bede were viewed liturgically. Others reveal the achievement of an 11th-century Canterbury scribe, lay out a hagiographical puzzle as to the saints venerated on the 19th January, ask why calendars come to be attached to psalters, demonstrate that monks at Canterbury Cathedral were still reading Old English homilies in the 1180s, and present a fascinating, previously misunderstood, psalter owned by bishop Ralph Baldock, c.1300. Two final papers deal with #65533;Sarum#65533; services in late medieval parish churches and with the devotional practice called St Gregory#65533;s Trental.

  • Liturgy in Byzantium and beyond / Robert F. Taft
    BX 350 T345 1995
    Liturgical ritual was a major element of the Christian cultures of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. This was especially true of Byzantium, where court and church ritual, often intertwined, achieved a splendour unparalleled by any other aspect of civic or religious life. In this volume Robert Taft has brought together a series of studies on the formation and development of these rites and on the meaning they had for contemporaries. Particular articles look at the role of Jerusalem, Constantinople, then Mt Athos, in this process, and at the liturgy of St John Chrysostom. Also included are two important studies focusing on the role of the bema in the Syriac Church.

  • The Routledge history of medieval Christianity 1050-1500 / edited by R.N. Swanson
    BR 162.3 R68 2015

    The Routledge History of Medieval Christianity explores the role of Christianity in European society from the middle of the eleventh-century until the dawning of the Reformation. Arranged in four thematic sections and comprising 23 originally commissioned chapters plus introductory overviews to each part by the editor, this book provides an authoritative survey of a vital element of medieval history.

    Comprehensive and cohesive, the volume provides a holistic view of Christianity in medieval Europe, examining not only the church itself but also its role in, influence on, and tensions with, contemporary society. Chapters therefore range from examinations of structures, theology and devotional practices within the church to topics such as gender, violence and holy warfare, the economy, morality, culture, and many more besides, demonstrating the pervasiveness and importance of the church and Christianity in the medieval world.

    Despite the transition into an increasingly post-Christian age, the historic role of Christianity in the development of Europe remains essential to the understanding of European history #65533; particularly in the medieval period. This collection will be essential reading for students and scholars of medieval studies across a broad range of disciplines.


  • Late Medieval liturgies enacted : the experience of worship in cathedral and parish church / edited by Sally Harper, Bangor University, UK, P.S. Barnwell, University of Oxford, UK, Magnus Williamson, Newcastle University, UK
    BV 185 L38 2016
    This book critically explores ways in which our understanding of late medieval liturgy can be enhanced through present-day enactment. It is a direct outcome of a practice-led research project, led by Professor John Harper and undertaken at Bangor University between 2010 and 2013 in partnership with Salisbury Cathedral and St Fagans National History Museum, near Cardiff. The book seeks to address the complex of ritual, devotional, musical, physical and architectural elements that constitute medieval Latin liturgy, whose interaction can be so difficult to recover other than through practice. In contrast with previous studies of reconstructed liturgies, enactment was not the exclusive end-goal of the project; rather it has created a new set of data for interpretation and further enquiry. Though based on a foundation of historical, musicological, textual, architectural and archaeological research, new methods of investigation and interpretation are explored, tested and validated throughout. There is emphasis on practice-led investigation and making; the need for imagination and creativity; and the fact that enactment participants can only be of the present day. Discussion of the processes of preparation, analysis and interpretation of the enactments is complemented by contextual studies, with particular emphasis on the provision of music. A distinctive feature of the work is that it seeks to understand the experiences of different groups within the medieval church - the clergy, their assistants, the singers, and the laity - as they participated in different kinds of rituals in both a large cathedral and a small parish church. Some of the conclusions challenge interpretations of these experiences, which have been current since the Reformation. In addition, some consideration is given to the implications of understanding past liturgy for present-day worship.

  • Goddess traditions in Tantric Hinduism : history, practice and doctrine / edited by, Bjarne Wernicke Olesen
    BL 1283.83 I54 2016

    Hinduism cannot be understood without the Great Goddess and the goddess-orientated Śākta traditions. The Goddess pervades Hinduism at all levels, from aniconic village deities to high-caste pan-Hindu goddesses to esoteric, tantric goddesses. Nevertheless, the highly influential tantric forms of South Asian goddess worship have only recently begun to draw scholarly attention. This book addresses the increasing interest in the Great Goddess and the tantric traditions of India by exploring the history, doctrine and practices of the Śākta tantric traditions.

    The highly influential tantric forms of South Asian goddess worship form a major part of what is known as 'Śāktism', and is often considered one of the major branches of Hinduism next to Śaivism, Vaiṣṇavism and Smārtism. Śāktism is, however, less clearly defined than the other major branches, and the book looks at the texts of the Śākta traditions that constitute the primary sources for gaining insights into the Śākta religious imaginative, ritual practices and history. It provides an historical exploration of distinctive Indian ways of imagining God as Goddess, and surveys the important origins and developments within Śākta history, practice and doctrine in its diversity.

    Bringing together contributions from some of the foremost scholars in the field of tantric studies, the book provides a platform for the continued research into Hindu goddesses, yoga, and tantra for those interested in understanding the religion and culture in South Asia.


  • John and Judaism : a contested relationship in context / edited by R. Alan Culpepper and Paul N. Anderson
    BM 535 J576 2017

    Written during the period of the emergence of Christianity and its separation from Judaism, the Gospel of John bears witness to their contested relationship. This volume contains cutting-edge essays written by an international group of scholars who interpret for students and general readers what John tells us about first-century Judaism, the separation of the church from Judaism, and how John's anti-Jewish references are interpreted today.


  • Sexism and god-talk : toward a feminist theology : with a new introduction / Rosemary Radford Ruether
    BT 83.55 R84 1993
    How did a religion whose founding proponents advocated a shocking disregard of earthly ties come to extol the virtues of the "traditional" family? In this richly textured history of the relationship between Christianity and the family Rosemary Radford Ruether traces the development of these centerpieces of modern life to reveal the misconceptions at the heart of the "family values" debate.

  • Vatican II and beyond : the changing mission and identity of Canadian women religious / Rosa Bruno-Jofré, Heidi MacDonald, and Elizabeth M. Smyth
    BX 1421.3 B78 2017
    The year 2015 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the end of the Second Vatican Council, which aimed to align the Church with the modern world. Over the last five decades, women religious have engaged with the council's reforms with unprecedented enthusiasm, far exceeding the expectations of the Church. Addressing how Canadian women religious envisioned and lived out the changes in religious life brought on by a pluralistic and secularizing world, Vatican II and Beyond analyzes the national organization of female and male congregations, the Canadian Religious Conference, and the lives of two individual sisters: visionary congregational leader Alice Trudeau and social justice activist Mary Alban. This book focuses on the new transnational networks, feminist concepts, professionalization of religious life, and complex political landscapes that emerged during this period of drastic transition as women religious sought to reconstruct identities, redefine roles, and signify vision and mission at both the personal and collective levels. Following women religious as they encountered new meanings of faith in their congregations, the Church, and society at large, Vatican II and Beyond demonstrates that the search for a renewed vision was not just a response to secularization, but a way to be reborn as Catholic women.

  • Eid ul-Fitr / Grace Jones ; edited by Amy Allatson
    BP 186.45 J66 2017
    Covers Judaism, Passover, cleaning the house, festive food,  the Seder, family and games, and more.

  • Martyrs : innocence, vengeance, and despair in the Middle East / Joyce M. Davis
    BP 190.5 M3 D39 2003
    Martyrsoffers compelling and chilling interviews with terrorist trainers, with the families of suicide bombers, fighters and fanatics, and with Muslim scholars offering differing opinions on the legitimacy of violence in Islam. Through the voices of those who plan and those who grieve,Martyrsprovides provocative and troubling insights into the zealotry that leads to the targeting of innocents, the endless cycle of revenge, and the despair that besets the Middle East. From Iran to Lebanon and the Palestinian territories, Joyce Davis reports on the rage that drives tragedies and at the despondency of the mothers of those who die and kill. Unsettling as the perspectives presented here may be, they are crucial to understanding, though not accepting, the fury at and resentment of the US.

  • The lion's roar of Queen Śrīmālā; a Buddhist scripture on the Tathāgatagarbha theory. Translated, with introd. and notes by Alex Wayman and Hideko Wayman
    BQ 1792 E5 W394

  • Women in world religions / edited by Arvind Sharma ; introduction by Katherine K. Young
    BL 458 W583 1987
    This is a book by women about women in the religions of the world. It presents all the basic facts and ideological issues concerning the position of women in the major religious traditions of humanity: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Taoism, and tribal religions.

    A special feature of the book is its phenomenological approach, wherein scholars examine sacred textual materials. Each contributor not only studies her religion from within, but also studies it from her own feminine perspective. Each is an adept historian of religions, who grounds her analysis in publicly verifiable facts. The book strikes a delicate balance between hard fact and delicate perception, the best tradition of phenomenology and the history of religions. It also demonstrates how much religions may vary over time.

    Contributors are Katherine K. Young, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at McGill University; Nancy Schuster Barnes, whose Ph.D. is in Sanskrit and Indian Studies; M. Theresa Kelleher, Assistant Professor of Religion and Asian Studies at Manhattanville College; Barbara Reed, Assistant Professor of Religion at St. Olaf College; Denise L. Carmody, Professor and Chair, Department of Religion, The University of Tulsa. Also Jane I. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Lecturer in Islamic Studies at Harvard Divinity School; Rosemary Radford Ruether, Georgia Harkness Professor of Applied Theology at the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; Rita M. Gross, Associate Professor of Comparative Religions at the University of Wisconsin, Eau Clair.


  • Mormonism; the Islam of America, by Bruce Kinney ..
    BX 8635 K5

  • Dionysos at large / Marcel Detienne ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer
    BL 820 B2D4513 1989
    Discusses the unique characteristics of the Greek god Dionysus, who is associated with strangers, epiphanies, the shedding of blood and the pouring wine."
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