« Back | Print 
Concordia.ca   /   Library   /   About the library   /   News   /   Acquisitions

New books by subject

sort items by: 
 RSS

GV 1580 - GV 1799.4 - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range GV 1580 to GV 1799.4 (Dance) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 90 days.


  • Gaelic Cape Breton step-dancing : an historical and ethnographic perspective / John G. Gibson
    GV 1793 G53 2017
    The step-dancing of the Scotch Gaels in Nova Scotia is the last living example of a form of dance that waned following the great emigrations to Canada that ended in 1845. The Scotch Gael has been reported as loving dance, but step-dancing in Scotland had all but disappeared by 1945. One must look to Gaelic Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, and Antigonish County, to find this tradition. Gaelic Cape Breton Step-Dancing, the first study of its kind, gives this art form and the people and culture associated with it the prominence they have long deserved. Gaelic Scotland's cultural record is by and large pre-literate, and references to dance have had to be sought in Gaelic songs, many of which were transcribed on paper by those who knew their culture might be lost with the decline of their language. The improved Scottish culture depended proudly on the teaching of dancing and the literate learning and transmission of music in accompaniment. Relying on fieldwork in Nova Scotia, and on mentions of dance in Gaelic song and verse in Scotland and Nova Scotia, John Gibson traces the historical roots of step-dancing, particularly the older forms of dancing originating in the Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlands. He also places the current tradition as a development and part of the much larger British and European percussive dance tradition. With insight collected through written sources, tales, songs, manuscripts, book references, interviews, and conversations, Gaelic Cape Breton Step-Dancing brings an important aspect of Gaelic history to the forefront of cultural debate.

  • Dance and gender : an evidence-based approach / edited by Wendy Oliver and Doug Risner
    GV 1588.6 D363 2017
    "Few volumes tackle the issue of gender and dance with such currency. A work of high quality, thorough in its composition, impeccable in its rigor, and far-reaching in its approach."--Julie Kerr-Berry, Minnesota State University, Mankato

    "Generous with data, this collection of accessible research will inspire a variety of emotions from anger to fascination, prompting us to question our own actions and the shape of the future of dance."--Barbara Bashaw, Rutgers University

    Driven by facts and hard data, this volume reveals how gender dynamics affect the lives of dancers, choreographers, directors, students, educators, and others who are involved in the world of dance. It unpacks real issues that matter--not just to dance communities but also to broader societal trends in the West.

    In these studies, dancers and dance scholars take readers into classrooms, rehearsals, performances, festivals, competitions, college dance departments, and company administrations. They ask incisive questions and analyze data to learn about the role of gender in attitudes, stereotypes, pedagogy, funding inequities, representation, casting, and body image. Dance is an important part of our larger cultural fabric, and this volume adds powerful findings to today's discussions about living in a gendered society.

    Contributors : Gareth Belling | Karen Bond | Carolyn Hebert | Eliza Larson | Pamela S. Musil | Wendy Oliver | Katherine Polasek | Doug Risner | Emily Roper | Karen Schupp | Jan Van Dyke

  • Invisible connections : dance, choreography and internet communities / Sita Popat
    GV 1595 P67 2006

    The first and only book to focus on dance on the Internet, Sita Popat#65533;s fascinating Invisible Connections examines how Internet and communication technologies offer dance and theatre new platforms for creating and performing work, and how opportunities for remote interaction and collaboration are available on a scale never before imaginable.

    Drawing upon the work of practioners and theorists in the arts, communications and technology theorists and , Invisible Connections makes special reference to Popat#65533;s series of Internet-based choreography projects from with online communities around the globe, and explores:

    * methods by which such technologies can facilitate creative collaborations between performers and viewers
    * how sharing creative processes between online communities can enrich the artistic palette and provide arts-based learning
    * how the Cartesian duality of the mind-body split is challenged by the physicality of dancing and choreography together online.

    With its dual aspect approach, from the author as an artist/researcher and the appendix being written by a software designer, the historical perspective on performance on the internet coupled with the writing makes this a must read book for any student of performance, dance or communication studies.

page last updated on: Thursday 21 September 2017
Back to top Back to top