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K - Law - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Law that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Challenges of nuclear waste governance : an international comparison. Achim Brunnengräber [and more], editors
    K3990

  • The scientist or engineer as an expert witness / James G. Speight
    KF 8968.66 S68 2009

    The increased technical nature of litigation coupled with an increase in the number of cases have given rise to the need for a book specifically written for scientists and engineers called to testify as expert witnesses. Unique in its approach, The Scientist or Engineer as an Expert Witnessassists these experts in clearly conveying the often complicated information to a non-technical audience.

    Highly detailed and exceedingly thorough in scope, the book begins with a complete discussion of the functions of the expert witness before delving into the process of how attorneys find experts. A significant portion discusses the professional resume and other tools the expert can use to market him- or herself. The author supplies a helpful primer on the rules of evidence and a discussion of the attorney-expert witness relationship. He includes ample treatment of the use of reports and visual aids, as well as issues that arise during depositions. The book closes with a comprehensive discussion of the trial itself, followed by post-trial responsibilities. A complete glossary of terms further clarifies the material.

    Dr. James G. Speight has more than 40 years' experience in areas associated with the properties and processing of conventional and synthetic fuels. He is the editor of the journals Petroleum Science and Technology, Energy Sources Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects, and Energy Sources Part B: Economics, Planning, and Policy.He has testified numerous times as an expert witness and the guidance he provides gives witnesses all the information needed to testify confidently and effectively.


  • Discussion paper on key legislative issues relating to child abuse / [prepared by Corinne Robertshaw]
    KE 8926 R63 1981

  • Fact-finding without facts : the uncertain evidentiary foundations of international criminal convictions / Nancy Amoury Combs
    KZ 7422 C66 2010
    Fact-Finding Without Facts explores international criminal fact-finding - empirically, conceptually, and normatively. After reviewing thousands of pages of transcripts from various international criminal tribunals, the author reveals that international criminal trials are beset by numerous and severe fact-finding impediments that substantially impair the tribunals' ability to determine who did what to whom. These fact-finding impediments have heretofore received virtually no publicity, let alone scholarly treatment, and they are deeply troubling not only because they raise grave concerns about the accuracy of the judgments currently being issued but because they can be expected to similarly impair the next generation of international trials that will be held at the International Criminal Court. After setting forth her empirical findings, the author considers their conceptual and normative implications. The author concludes that international criminal tribunals purport a fact-finding competence that they do not possess and, as a consequence, base their judgments on a less precise, more amorphous method of fact-finding than they publicly acknowledge.

  • Feminist judgments : from theory to practice / edited by Rosemary Hunter, Clare McGlynn, and Erika Rackley [foreword by Brenda Hale]
    KD 734 F458 2010
    No Marketing Blurb

  • Medieval lawyer : Clement Spice of Essex / Christopher Starr
    KD 621 S65 S73 2014

  • Justice and Mercy Have Met : Pope Francis and the Reform of the Marriage Nullity Process / Kurt Martens, editor
    KBU 3897 J876 2017eb

  • The Constitutional Rights of Children : In re Gault and Juvenile Justice / David S. Tanenhaus
    KF 228 G377 T36 2011eb
    This new edition upon the 50th anniversary of In re Gault includes expanded coverage of the Roberts Court's juvenile justice decisions including Miller v. Alabama ; explains how disregard for children's constitutional rights led to the "Kids for Cash" scandal in Pennsylvania; new legal developments in the Gault case; and, updates the bibliography and chronology.

    When fifteen-year-old Gerald Gault of Globe, Arizona, allegedly made an obscene phone call to a neighbor, he was arrested by the local police, tried in a proceeding that did not require his accuser's testimony, and sentenced to six years in a juvenile "boot camp"--for an offense that would have cost an adult only two months. Even in a nation fed up with juvenile delinquency, that sentence seemed excessive and inspired a spirited defense on Gault's behalf. Led by Norman Dorsen, the ACLU ultimately took Gault's case to the Supreme Court and in 1967 won a landmark decision authored by Justice Abe Fortas. Widely celebrated as the most important children's rights case of the twentieth century, In re Gault affirmed that children have some of the same rights as adults and formally incorporated the Fourteenth Amendment's due process protections into the administration of the nation's juvenile courts.

  • Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Laws : Policies, and Institutions / by Adamu Kyuka Usman
    KTA 1010.5 U766 2017eb
    Though predominantly on oil and gas law, this is nonetheless a veritable Reference Book on the oil and gas industry in Nigeria. It places before anyone interested in the oil and gas industry basic and critical oil and gas issues not in common circulation in existing texts on the subject. The book is arranged in such a chronological order, like reference books and dictionaries tend to be,that a lay person in going through it would now know how oil is explored and found,how oil fields may be onshore and offshore, how oil blocs are bidded for, how oil is drilled, including associated gas deposits, among others. The transportation of oil and gas, storage of oil and gas, refining of oil and processing of gas, marketing of oil and gas,the impact of oil and gas exploration, production and revenues on the Nigerian environment, politics and economy and a myriad of other issues are comprehensively covered. The book should prove most useful to the lawyer, petroleum geologist, petroleum engineer, policy makers, investors, local and international development agencies and bodies, lecturers and students specialising in wide ranging subjects as economics, development studies, engineering, management, public administration, insurance, marketing, accounting and finance.

  • Civil Justice Reconsidered : Toward a Less Costly, More Accessible Litigation System / Steven P. Croley
    KF 8700 C76 2017eb
    Prosecutes the civil litigation system and proposes practical reforms to increase access to the courts and reduce costs.

    Civil litigation has come under fire in recent years. Some critics portray a system of dishonest lawyers and undeserving litigants who prevail too often, and are awarded too much money. Others criticize the civil justice system for being out of reach for many who have suffered real injury. But contrary to these perspectives and popular belief, the civil justice system in the United States is not out of control.

    In Civil Justice Reconsidered, Steven Croley demonstrates that civil litigation is, for the most part, socially beneficial. An effective civil litigation system is accessible to parties who have suffered legal wrongs, and it is reliable in the sense that those with stronger claims tend to prevail over those with weaker claims. However, while most of the system's failures are overstated, they are not wholly off base; civil litigation often imposes excessive costs that, among other unfortunate consequences, impede access to the courts, and Croley offers ways to reform civil litigation in the interest of justice for potential plaintiffs and defendants, and for the rule of law itself.

    A better litigation system matters only because of what is at stake for real people, and Civil Justice Reconsidered speaks to the thought leaders, litigation reformers, members of the bar and bench, and policymakers who can answer the call for reforming civil litigation in the United States.

  • Blaming Mothers : American Law and the Risks to Children's Health / Linda C. Fentiman
    KF 9323 F46 2017eb

  • Vaccine Court : The Law and Politics of Injury / Anna Kirkland
    KF 3808 K57 2016eb
    The so-called vaccine court is a small special court in the United States Court of Federal Claims that handles controversial claims that a vaccine has harmed someone. While vaccines in general are extremely safe and effective, some people still suffer severe vaccine reactions and bring their claims to vaccine court. In this court, lawyers, activists, judges, doctors, and scientists come together, sometimes arguing bitterly, trying to figure out whether a vaccine really caused a person's medical problem.

    In Vaccine Court, Anna Kirkland draws on the trials of the vaccine court to explore how legal institutions resolve complex scientific questions. What are vaccine injuries, and how do we come to recognize them? What does it mean to transform these questions into a legal problem and funnel them through a special national vaccine court, as we do in the U.S.' What does justice require for vaccine injury claims, and how can we deliver it? These are highly contested questions, and the terms in which they have been debated over the last forty years are highly revealing of deeper fissures in our society over motherhood, community, health, harm, and trust in authority. While many scholars argue that it's foolish to let judges and lawyers decide medical claims about vaccines, Kirkland argues that our political and legal response to vaccine injury claims shows how well legal institutions can handle specialized scientific matters. Vaccine Court is an accessible and thorough account of what the vaccine court is, why we have it, and what it does.

  • On the Jury Trial : Principles and Practices for Effective Advocacy / Thomas M. Melsheimer, Judge Craig Smith
    KF 8915 M45 2017eb

  • When the Senate Worked for Us : The Invisible Role of Staffers in Countering Corporate Lobbies / Michael Pertschuk
    KF 373 P478 A3 2017eb

  • Holocaust, Corporations, and the Law / Leora Bilsky
    KF 6075 B555 2017eb

  • Defending Faith : The Politics of the Christian Conservative Legal Movement / Daniel Bennett
    KF 299 C47 B36 2017eb
    When, in Obergefell v. Hodges , the US Supreme Court held that bans on same-sex marriage violate the Constitution, Christian conservative legal organizations (CCLOs) decried the ruling. Foreseeing an "assault against Christians," Liberty Counsel president Mat Staver declared, "We are entering a cultural civil war." Many would argue that a cultural war was already well underway; and yet, as this timely book makes clear, the stakes, the forces engaged, and the strategies employed have undergone profound changes in recent years.

    In Defending Faith , Daniel Bennett shows how the Christian legal movement (CLM) and its affiliated organizations arrived at this moment in time. He explains how CCLOs advocate for issues central to Christian conservatives, highlights the influence of religious liberty on the CLM's broader agenda, and reveals how the Christian Right has become accustomed to the courts as a field of battle in today's culture wars. On one level a book about how the Christian Right mobilized and organized an effective presence on an unavoidable front in battles over social policy, the courtroom, Defending Faith is also a case study of interest groups pursuing common goals while maintaining unique identities. As different as these proliferating groups might be, they are alike in increasingly construing their efforts as a defense of religious freedom against hostile forces throughout American society--and thus as benefitting society as a whole rather than limiting the rights of certain groups. The first holistic, wide-angle picture of the Christian legal movement in the United States, Bennett's work tells the story of the growth of a powerful legal community and of the development of legal advocacy as a tool of social and political engagement.

  • A Courageous Fool : Marie Deans and Her Struggle against the Death Penalty / Todd C. Peppers, with Margaret A. Anderson ; foreword by Joseph M. Giarratano
    KF 9227 C2 P45 2017eb

  • Expanding Intellectual Property : Copyrights and Patents in 20th Century Europe and beyond / Edited by Hannes Siegrist and Augusta Dimou
    KJC 2636 E98 2017eb

  • Knowing Where It Comes From : Labeling Traditional Foods to Compete in a Global Market / Fabio Parasecoli
    K 3626 P37 2017eb
    Offering the first broadly comparative analysis of place-based labeling and marketing systems, Knowing Where It Comes From examines the way claims about the origins and meanings of traditional foods get made around the world, from Italy and France to Costa Rica and Thailand. It also highlights the implications of different systems for both producers and consumers.
    Labeling regimes have moved beyond intellectual property to embrace community-based protections, intangible cultural heritage, cultural landscapes, and indigenous knowledge. Reflecting a rich array of juridical, regulatory, and activist perspectives, these approaches seek to level the playing field on which food producers and consumers interact.

  • The Baneberry Disaster : A Generation of Atomic Fallout / Larry C. Johns and Alan R. Johns
    KF 224 B257 J64 2017eb

  • Everyday Law in Russia / Kathryn Hendley
    KLB 68 H46 2017eb

    Everyday Law in Russia challenges the prevailing common wisdom that Russians cannot rely on their law and that Russian courts are hopelessly politicized and corrupt. While acknowledging the persistence of verdicts dictated by the Kremlin in politically charged cases, Kathryn Hendley explores how ordinary Russian citizens experience law. Relying on her own extensive observational research in Russia's new justice-of-the-peace courts as well as her analysis of a series of focus groups, she documents Russians' complicated attitudes regarding law. The same Russian citizen who might shy away from taking a dispute with a state agency or powerful individual to court might be willing to sue her insurance company if it refuses to compensate her for damages following an auto accident. Hendley finds that Russian judges pay close attention to the law in mundane disputes, which account for the vast majority of the cases brought to the Russian courts.

    Any reluctance on the part of ordinary Russian citizens to use the courts is driven primarily by their fear of the time and cost--measured in both financial and emotional terms--of the judicial process. Like their American counterparts, Russians grow more willing to pursue disputes as the social distance between them and their opponents increases; Russians are loath to sue friends and neighbors, but are less reluctant when it comes to strangers or acquaintances. Hendley concludes that the "rule of law" rubric is ill suited to Russia and other authoritarian polities where law matters most--but not all--of the time.


  • Framing the Farm Bill : Interests, Ideology, and the Agricultural Act of 2014 / Christopher Bosso
    KF 1681 A3282014 B67 2017eb
    In January 2014, for the first time in the history of federal farm legislation going back to the Great Depression, all four members of the US House of Representatives from Kansas voted against the Farm Bill, despite pleas by the state's agricultural leaders to support it. Why? The story of the Agricultural Act of 2014, as it unfolds in Framing the Farm Bill , has much to tell us about the complex nature of farm legislation, food policy, and partisan politics in present-day America.

    The Farm Bill is essential to the continuation of the many programs that structure agriculture in this country, from farm loans, commodity subsidies, and price supports for farmers to food support for the poor, notably food stamps. It was in the 1970s, with urbanization increasingly undermining political interest in farm programs, that rural legislators added the food stamp program to the Farm Bill to build support among urban and suburban legislators. Christopher Bosso offers a deft account of how this strategy, which over time led to the food stamp program becoming the largest expenditure in the Farm Bill, ran into the wave of conservative Republicans swept into Congress in 2010. With many of these new members objecting to the very existence of the food stamp program--and in many cases to government's involvement in agriculture, period--and with Democrats vehemently opposing reductions, especially in light of the 2008 recession, the stage was set for a battle involving some of the most crucial issues in American life.

    Framing the Farm Bill is an enlightening look at federal agricultural policy--its workings, its history, and its present state--as well as the effect federal legislation has on farming practices, the environment, and our diet, in a thoroughly readable primer on the politics of food in America.

  • Calling the Shots : The President, Executive Orders, and Public Policy / Daniel P. Gitterman
    KF 5053 G58 2017eb

  • Inside Rwanda's Gacaca courts : seeking justice after genocide / Bert Ingelaere
    KTD 157.7 I54 2016eb
    After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, victims, perpetrators, and the country as a whole struggled to deal with the legacy of the mass violence. The government responded by creating a new version of a traditional grassroots justice system called gacaca . Bert Ingelaere offers a comprehensive assessment of what these courts set out to do, how they worked, what they achieved, what they did not achieve, and how they affected Rwandan society. Weaving together vivid firsthand recollections, interviews, and trial testimony with systematic analysis, he documents how the gacaca shifted over time from confession to accusation, from restoration to retribution. This is an authoritative account of one of the most important experiments in transitional justice after mass violence.


  • Legalizing Plural Marriage : The Next Frontier in Family Law / Mark Goldfeder
    KF 519 G65 2015eb
    Polygamous marriages are currently recognized in nearly fifty countries worldwide. Although polygamy is technically illegal in the United States, it is practiced by members of some religious communities and a growing number of other "poly" groups. In the radically changing and increasingly multicultural world in which we live, the time has come to define polygamous marriage and address its legal feasibilities.

    Although Mark Goldfeder does not argue the right or wrong of plural marriage, he maintains that polygamy is the next step--after same-sex marriage--in the development of U.S. family law. Providing a road map to show how such legalization could be handled, he explores the legislative and administrative arguments which demonstrate that plural marriage is not as farfetched--or as far off--as we might think. Goldfeder argues not only that polygamy is in keeping with the legislative values and freedoms of the United States, but also that it would not be difficult to manage or administrate within our current legal system. His legal analysis is enriched throughout with examples of plural marriage in diverse cultural and historical contexts.

    Tackling the issue of polygamy in the United States from a legal perspective, this book will engage anyone interested in constitutional law, family law, or criminal law, along with sociologists and those who study gender and culture in modern times.

  • The Fall and Rise of Blasphemy Law / edited by Paul Cliteur and Tom Herrenberg
    K 5305 F357 2016eb

  • "The Great Power of Attorney" : Understanding the Fiduciary Constitution / Gary Lawson and Guy I. Seidman
    KF 4541 L339 2017eb
    What kind of document is the United States Constitution and how does that characterization affect its meaning? Those questions are seemingly foundational for the entire enterprise of constitutional theory, but they are strangely under-examined. Legal scholars Gary Lawson and Guy Seidman propose that the Constitution, for purposes of interpretation, is a kind of fiduciary, or agency, instrument. The founding generation often spoke of the Constitution as a fiduciary document--or as a "great power of attorney," in the words of founding-era legal giant James Iredell. Viewed against the background of fiduciary legal and political theory, which would have been familiar to the founding generation from both its education and its experience, the Constitution is best read as granting limited powers to the national government, as an agent, to manage some portion of the affairs of "We the People" and its "posterity." What follows from this particular conception of the Constitution--and is of greater importance--is the question of whether, and how much and in what ways, the discretion of governmental agents in exercising those constitutionally granted powers is also limited by background norms of fiduciary obligation. Those norms, the authors remind us, include duties of loyalty, care, impartiality, and personal exercise. In the context of the Constitution, this has implications for everything from non-delegation to equal protection to so-called substantive due process, as well as for the scope of any implied powers claimed by the national government.

    In mapping out what these imperatives might mean--such as limited discretionary power, limited implied powers, a need to engage in fair dealing with all parties, and an obligation to serve at all times the interests of the Constitution's beneficiaries--Lawson and Seidman offer a clearer picture of the original design for a limited government.

  • Supreme Court Expansion of Presidential Power : Unconstitutional Leanings / Louis Fisher
    KF 5053 F59 2017eb
    In the fourth of the Federalist Papers, published in 1787, John Jay warned of absolute monarchs who "will often make war when their nations are to get nothing by it." More than two centuries later, are single executives making unilateral decisions any more trustworthy? And have the checks on executive power, so critical in the Founders' drafting of the Constitution, held? These are the questions Louis Fisher pursues in this book. By examining the executive actions of American presidents, particularly after World War II, Fisher reveals how the Supreme Court, through errors and abdications, has expanded presidential power in external affairs beyond constitutional boundaries--and damaged the nation's system of checks and balances.

    Supreme Court Expansion of Presidential Power reviews the judicial record from 1789 to the present day to show how the balance of power has shifted over time. For nearly a century and a half, the Supreme Court did not indicate a preference for which of the two elected branches should dominate in the field of external affairs. But from the mid-thirties a pattern clearly emerges, with the Court regularly supporting independent presidential power in times of "emergency," or issues linked to national security. The damage this has done to democracy and constitutional government is profound, Fisher argues. His evidence extends beyond external affairs to issues of domestic policy, such as impoundment of funds, legislative vetoes, item-veto authority, presidential immunity in the Paula Jones case, recess appointments, and the Obama administration's immigration initiatives.

    Fisher identifies contemporary biases that have led to an increase in presidential power--including Supreme Court misconceptions and errors, academic failings, and mistaken beliefs about "inherent powers" and "unity of office." Calling to account the forces tasked with protecting our democracy from the undue exercise of power by any single executive, his deeply informed book sounds a compelling alarm.

  • Slavery and Freedom in Texas : Stories from the Courtroom, 1821-1871 / Jason A. Gillmer
    KFT 1611.5 A34 G55 2017eb

    In these absorbing accounts of five court cases, Jason A. Gillmer offers intimate glimpses into Texas society in the time of slavery. Each story unfolds along boundaries--between men and women, slave and free, black and white, rich and poor, old and young--as rigid social orders are upset in ways that drive people into the courtroom.

    One case involves a settler in a rural county along the Colorado River, his thirty-year relationship with an enslaved woman, and the claims of their children as heirs. A case in East Texas arose after an owner refused to pay an overseer who had shot one of her slaves. Another case details how a free family of color carved out a life in the sparsely populated marshland of Southeast Texas, only to lose it all as waves of new settlers "civilized" the county. An enslaved woman in Galveston who was set free in her owner's will--and who got an uncommon level of support from her attorneys--is the subject of another case. In a Central Texas community, as another case recounts, citizens forced a Choctaw native into court in an effort to gain freedom for his slave, a woman who easily "passed" as white.

    The cases considered here include Gaines v. Thomas, Clark v. Honey, Brady v. Price, and Webster v. Heard. All of them pitted communal attitudes and values against the exigencies of daily life in an often harsh place. Here are real people in their own words, as gathered from trial records, various legal documents, and many other sources. People of many colors, from diverse backgrounds, weave their way in and out of the narratives. We come to know what mattered most to them--and where those personal concerns stood before the law.


  • Tell : Love, Defiance, and the Military Trial at the Tipping Point for Gay Rights / Major Margaret Witt ; with Tim Connor
    KF 229 W58 W58 2017eb
    In 1993 Margie Witt, a young Air Force nurse, was chosen as the face of the Air Force's "Cross into the Blue" recruitment campaign. This was also the year that President Clinton's plan for gays to serve openly in the military was quashed by an obdurate Congress, resulting in the blandly cynical political compromise known as Don't Ask, Don't Tell. Contrary to its intent, DADT had the perverse effect of making it harder for gay servicemen and -women to fight expulsion. Over the next seventeen years more than 13,000 gay soldiers, sailors, marines, coast guard, and airmen and -women were removed from military service. That is, until Margie Witt's landmark case put a stop to it.

    Tell is the riveting story of Major Margaret Witt's dedicated and decorated military career as a frontline flight nurse, and of her love and devotion to her partner--now wife--Laurie Johnson. Tell captures the tension and drama of the politically charged legal battle that led to the congressional repeal of the controversial law and helped pave the way for a suite of landmark political and legal victories for gay rights. Tell is a testament to the power of love to transform hearts and minds, as well as a celebration of the indomitable spirit of Major Witt, her wife Laurie, her dedicated legal team, and the brave men and women who came forward to testify on her behalf in a historic federal trial.

    "The name Margaret Witt may join the canon of US civil rights pioneers." --Guardian

    "Major Witt's trial provided an unparalleled opportunity to attack the central premise of [Don't Ask, Don't Tell] . . . and set an important precedent."-- New York Times

    "A landmark ruling."--Politico

  • Blood on Their Hands : How Greedy Companies, Inept Bureaucracy, and Bad Science Killed Thousands of Hemophiliacs / Eric Weinberg and Donna Shaw
    KF 3894 B5 W45 2017eb
    A few short years after HIV first entered the world blood supply in the late 1970s and early 1980s, over half the hemophiliacs in the United States were infected with the virus. But this was far more than just an unforeseeable public health disaster. Negligent doctors, government regulators, and Big Pharma all had a hand in this devastating epidemic.

    Blood on Their Hands is an inspiring, firsthand account of the legal battles fought on behalf of hemophiliacs who were unwittingly infected with tainted blood. As part of the team behind the key class action litigation filed by the infected, young New Jersey lawyer Eric Weinberg was faced with a daunting task: to prove the negligence of a powerful, well-connected global industry worth billions. Weinberg and journalist Donna Shaw tell the dramatic story of how idealistic attorneys and their heroic, mortally-ill clients fought to achieve justice and prevent further infections. A stunning exposé of one of the American medical system's most shameful debacles, Blood on Their Hands is a rousing reminder that, through perseverance, the victims of corporate greed can sometimes achieve great victory.

  • Miles Lord : The Maverick Judge Who Brought Corporate America to Justice / Roberta Walburn
    KF 373 L56 W35 2017eb

    This is the story of Miles Lord (1919-2016), who rose from humble beginnings on Minnesota's Iron Range to become one of the most colorful and powerful judges in the country, described as "an unabashed Prairie populist" and "a live-wire slayer of corporate behemoths." He cut a wide swath through history on his path to the bench: coming of age alongside a cadre of young Midwestern social-gospel progressives, including Hubert H. Humphrey, Eugene McCarthy, and Walter Mondale, in the days before they reached national fame; teaming with Bobby Kennedy as a hotshot prosecutor in pursuit of Jimmy Hoffa; and serving as the secret envoy between his friends Hubert and Eugene in their battle for the soul of the Democratic party in the historic 1968 presidential campaign. Later, after donning his black robe, he reshaped jurisprudence with precedent-breaking rulings--on issues ranging from women's rights to consumer protection to education reform--and breaking trail when he ordered the shutdown of the Reserve Mining Company in northern Minnesota, which was spewing its waste into Lake Superior, in the most sensational trial of the early environmental era.

    One of Judge Lord's landmark cases--and interlaced as a centerpiece narrative of this book--involved the Dalkon Shield intrauterine device, which caused horrific infections in thousands of women, resulting in infertility and sometimes death. Author Roberta Walburn served as the judge's law clerk during that litigation in 1983-84, and she provides a page-turning account (both an insider's view and an in-depth chronicle) of what was called "one of the most disastrous episodes of American corporate misconduct." In the end, more than 200,000 women received nearly $3 billion in compensation, and the Fortune 500 defendant was left in ruins. But Judge Lord was hauled up on judicial misconduct charges for his no-holds-barred actions that were certainly provocative but also stand as a timely reminder, even (or especially) today, of the challenges in balancing the scales of justice for a legal system that too often skews to the rich and powerful.

    The author deftly weaves the Dalkon Shield drama into the larger story of the life of a one-of-a-kind man, crafting a sweeping and spirited true-life tale with not only her first-hand experiences as the judge's law clerk but also with unrestricted access to the judge's personal files. This is a rare and compelling portrait of a remarkable man and his place in both Minnesota and U.S. history.


  • The Killing of Julia Wallace / Jonathan Goodman
    KD 373 W3 G6 2017eb

    The brutal murder of Julia Wallace in 1931 became one of Britain's great unsolved murders. People began arguing about the case almost immediately and continue to do so to this day.

    Julia was the middle-aged wife of a mild-mannered Liverpool insurance agent, William Herbert Wallace. By all accounts they were a quiet, unassuming, devoted couple. In January 1931 William Wallace received a telephone message to come to an address in Liverpool the following evening to discuss an insurance policy. Unable to find the house after searching for hours, Wallace determined there was no such address and returned home. There he found Julia bludgeoned to death on the parlor floor. In addition to the terrible shock and his unbearable loss, Wallace was accused of the crime and ultimately convicted.

    Using original sources, Jonathan Goodman re-creates Wallace's trial, witness by witness. Through his meticulous reconstruction, it becomes evident that the police and the medical examiner went out of their way to twist and even manufacture evidence. Their attention to proving Wallace guilty ignored a lead to a likely suspect given to them by Wallace. The man was a fellow insurance agent, whom Goodman identifies in the book as Mr. X. The police ignored the suggestion.

    In 1969, when The Killing of Julia Wallace was first published in the United Kingdom, Goodman had picked up on the lead the police disregarded.

    As a result, he was convinced that Wallace was unjustly convicted. In 1981 Goodman revealed the name of the suspect, who was by then deceased. The suspect had a long record of criminal charges that had been dropped or dismissed due to his family connections--his father and uncle were local officials; his father's secretary was the daughter of the police superintendent.

    True crime fans will welcome the return of this classic unsolved mystery by the inimitable Jonathan Goodman.


  • Ancient Law, Ancient Society / Dennis P. Kehoe and Thomas A.J. McGinn, Editors
    KL 4121 A45 2017eb
    The essays composing Ancient Law, Ancient Society examine the law in classical antiquity both as a product of the society in which it developed and as one of the most important forces shaping that society. Contributors to this volume consider the law via innovative methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives--in particular, those drawn from the new institutional economics and the intersection of law and economics.

    Essays cover topics such as using collective sanctions to enforce legal norms; the Greek elite's marriage strategies for amassing financial resources essential for a public career; defenses against murder charges under Athenian criminal law, particularly in cases where the victim put his own life in peril; the interplay between Roman law and provincial institutions in regulating water rights; the Severan-age Greek author Aelian's notions of justice and their influence on late-classical Roman jurisprudence; Roman jurists' approach to the contract of mandate in balancing the changing needs of society against respect for upper-class concepts of duty and reciprocity; whether the Roman legal authorities developed the law exclusively to serve the Roman elite's interests or to meet the needs of the Roman Empire's broader population as well; and an analysis of the Senatus Consultum Claudianum in the Code of Justinian demonstrating how the late Roman government adapted classical law to address marriage between free women and men classified as coloni bound to their land.

    In addition to volume editors Dennis P. Kehoe and Thomas A. J. McGinn, contributors include Adriaan Lanni, Michael Leese, David Phillips, Cynthia Bannon, Lauren Caldwell, Charles Pazdernik, and Clifford Ando.




  • The Australian Pursuit of Japanese War Criminals, 1943-1957 : From Foe to Friend / Dean Aszkielowicz
    KU 43 A793 2017eb

  • "Esteemed Bookes of Lawe" and the Legal Culture of Early Virginia / edited by Warren M. Billings and Brent Tarter
    KFV 2478 E84 2017eb

    Virginia men of law constituted one of the first learned professions in colonial America, and Virginia legal culture had an important and lasting impact on American political institutions and jurisprudence. Exploring the book collections of these Virginians therefore offers insight into the history of the book and the intellectual history of early America. It also addresses essential questions of how English culture migrated to the American colonies and was transformed into a distinctive American culture.

    Focusing on the law books that colonial Virginians acquired, how they used them, and how they eventually produced a native-grown legal literature, this collection explores the law and intellectual culture of the Commonwealth and reveals the origins of a distinctively Virginian legal literature. The contributors argue that understanding the development of early Virginia legal history--as shown through these book collections--not only illuminates important aspects of Virginia's history and culture; it also underlies a thorough understanding of colonial and revolutionary American history and culture.


  • Homicide Justified : The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and the Atlantic World / Andrew T. Fede
    KF 4545 S5 F43 2017eb

    This comparative study looks at the laws concerning the murder of slaves by their masters and at how these laws were implemented. Andrew T. Fede cites a wide range of cases--across time, place, and circumstance--to illuminate legal, judicial, and other complexities surrounding this regrettably common occurrence. These laws had evolved to limit in different ways the masters' rights to severely punish and even kill their slaves while protecting valuable enslaved people, understood as "property," from wanton destruction by hirers, overseers, and poor whites who did not own slaves.

    To explore the conflicts of masters' rights with state and colonial laws, Fede shows how slave homicide law evolved and was enforced not only in the United States but also in ancient Roman, Visigoth, Spanish, Portuguese, French, and British jurisdictions. His comparative approach reveals how legal reforms regarding slave homicide in antebellum times, like past reforms dictated by emperors and kings, were the products of changing perceptions of the interests of the public; of the individual slave owners; and of the slave owners' families, heirs, and creditors.

    Although some slave murders came to be regarded as capital offenses, the laws con#65533;sistently reinforced the second-class status of slaves. This influence, Fede concludes, flowed over into the application of law to free African Americans and would even make itself felt in the legal attitudes that underlay the Jim Crow era.


  • The History of Courts and Procedure in Medieval Canon Law / edited by Wilfried Hartmann and Kenneth Pennington
    KBU 3782 H57 2016eb

  • Human Rights after Hitler : The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes / Dan Plesch
    KZ 1174.5 P58 2017eb

  • Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court : From Brandeis to Kagan / Dalin, David G
    KF 8744 D35 2017eb
    Runner-up for the National Jewish Book Award, biography category (2017)

    Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court examines the lives, legal careers, and legacies of the eight Jews who have served or who currently serve as justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Louis D. Brandeis, Benjamin Cardozo, Felix Frankfurter, Arthur Goldberg, Abe Fortas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, and Elena Kagan.

    David Dalin discusses the relationship that these Jewish justices have had with the presidents who appointed them, and given the judges' Jewish background, investigates the antisemitism some of the justices encountered in their ascent within the legal profession before their appointment, as well as the role that antisemitism played in the attendant political debates and Senate confirmation battles.

    Other topics and themes include the changing role of Jews within the American legal profession and the views and judicial opinions of each of the justices on freedom of speech, freedom of religion, the death penalty, the right to privacy, gender equality, and the rights of criminal defendants, among other issues.

  • Native Estates: Records of Mobility across Colonial Boundaries / Ellen Ndeshi Namhila
    KSY 780 N366 2017eb
    In many instances, the colonial state has left a strong imprint on the postcolonial archive. In the National Archives of Namibia (NAN), for instance, it is difficult to locate pre-independence person-related records of the black majority, while the same type of records of their light-skinned compatriots are easily accessible. This lecture discusses a substantial corpus of about 11 000 so-called �Native Estates� files which previously were not accessible through the existing finding aids. What is the research potential of these formerly neglected and untouched records in particular regarding the social history of contract labour in Namibia and of African migrants on a wider scale? Furthermore, a substantial amount of estate files of migrants from other African countries were discovered � a feature of Namibian history that has rarely been researched. The sometimes very detailed files reveal information on the migrants� origin, their integration in Namibian society and expatriate networks in the country. They also reveal that not only Angolans and West Africans but also a substantial number of migrants from other Southern African colonies found employment opportunities in Namibia during the colonial era. The �Native Estate� records thus have an important research potential with regard to the entire Southern African region, which was heavily reliant on migrant labour both on the demand and on the supply side.

  • Julius Chambers : A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights / Richard A. Rosen and Joseph Mosnier
    KF 373 C3883 R+eb

  • Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law / Kate Elizabeth Brown
    KF 363 H3 B76 2017eb
    Alexander Hamilton is commonly seen as the standard-bearer of an ideology-turned-political party, the Federalists, engaged in a struggle for the soul of the young United States against the Anti-Federalists, and later, the Jeffersonian Republicans. Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law counters such conventional wisdom with a new, more nuanced view of Hamilton as a true federalist, rather than a one-dimensional nationalist, whose most important influence on the American founding is his legal legacy.

    In this analytical biography, Kate Elizabeth Brown recasts our understanding of Hamilton's political career, his policy achievements, and his significant role in the American founding by considering him first and foremost as a preeminent lawyer who applied law and legal arguments to accomplish his statecraft. In particular, Brown shows how Hamilton used inherited English legal principles to accomplish his policy goals, and how state and federal jurists adapted these Hamiltonian principles into a distinct, republican jurisprudence throughout the nineteenth century. When writing his authoritative commentary on the nature of federal constitutional power in The Federalist , Hamilton juxtaposed the British constitution with the new American one he helped to create; when proposing commercial, monetary, banking, administrative, or foreign policy in Washington's cabinet, he used legal arguments to justify his desired course of action. In short, lawyering, legal innovation, and common law permeated Alexander Hamilton's professional career.

    Re-examining Hamilton's post-war accomplishments through the lens of law, Brown demonstrates that Hamilton's much-studied political career, as well as his contributions to republican political science, cannot be fully understood without recognizing and investigating how Hamilton used Anglo-American legal principles to achieve these ends. A critical re-evaluation of Hamilton's legacy, as well as his place in the founding era, Brown's work also enhances and refines our understanding of the nature and history of American jurisprudence.

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Feminist Foundations of Family Law / Tracy A. Thomas
    KF 505 T46 2016eb

  • Gender and Justice in Family Law Disputes : Women, Mediation, and Religious Arbitration / Samia Bano, Editor
    K 672 G46 2017eb
    Recently, new methods of dispute resolution in matters of family law--such as arbitration, mediation, and conciliation--have created new forms of legal culture that affect minority communities throughout the world. There are now multiple ways of obtaining restitution through nontraditional alternative dispute resolution (ADR) mechanisms. For some, the emergence of ADRs can be understood as part of a broader liberal response to the challenges presented by the settlement of migrant communities in Western liberal democracies. Questions of rights are framed as "multicultural challenges" that give rise to important issues relating to power, authority, agency, and choice. Underpinning these debates are questions about the doctrine and practice of secularism, citizenship, belonging, and identity.

    Gender and Justice in Family Law Disputes offers insights into how women's autonomy and personal decision-making capabilities are expressed via multiple formal and nonformal dispute-resolution mechanisms, and as part of their social and legal lived realities. It analyzes the specific ways in which both mediation and religious arbitration take shape in contemporary and comparative family law across jurisdictions. Demarcating lines between contemporary family mediation and new forms of religious arbitration, Bano illuminates the complexities of these processes across multiple national contexts.

  • The Case of Rose Bird : Gender, Politics, and the California Courts / Kathleen A. Cairns
    KF 373 B527 C35 2016eb
    Rose Elizabeth Bird was forty years old when in 1977 Governor Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown chose her to become California's first female supreme court chief justice. Appointed to a court with a stellar reputation for being the nation's most progressive, Bird became a lightning rod for the opposition due to her liberalism, inexperience, and gender. Over the next decade, her name became a rallying cry as critics mounted a relentless effort to get her off the court. Bird survived three unsuccessful recall efforts, but her opponents eventually succeeded in bringing about her defeat in 1986, making her the first chief justice to be removed from the California Supreme Court.

    The Case of Rose Bird provides a fascinating look at this important and complex woman and the political and cultural climate of California in the 1970s and 1980s. Seeking to uncover the identities and motivations of Bird's vehement critics, Kathleen A. Cairns traces Bird's meteoric rise and cataclysmic fall. Cairns considers the instrumental role that then-current gender dynamics played in Bird's downfall, most visible in the tensions between second-wave feminism and the many Americans who felt that a "radical" feminist agenda might topple long-standing institutions and threaten "traditional" values.



  • Demanding Justice and Security : Indigenous Women and Legal Pluralities in Latin America / edited by Rachel Sieder
    KG 483 W66 D46 2017eb
    Across Latin America, indigenous women are organizing to challenge racial, gender, and class discrimination through the courts. Collectively, by engaging with various forms of law, they are forging new definitions of what justice and security mean within their own contexts and struggles. They have challenged racism and the exclusion of indigenous people in national reforms, but also have challenged 'bad customs' and gender ideologies that exclude women within their own communities.

    Featuring chapters on Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Mexico, the contributors to Demanding Justice and Security include both leading researchers and community activists. From Kichwa women in Ecuador lobbying for the inclusion of specific clauses in the national constitution that guarantee their rights to equality and protection within indigenous community law, to Me'phaa women from Guerrero, Mexico, battling to secure justice within the Inter-American Court of Human Rights for violations committed in the context of militarizing their home state, this book is a must-have for anyone who wants to understand the struggle of indigenous women in Latin America.

  • Gender, Justice, and the Problem of Culture : From Customary Law to Human Rights in Tanzania / Dorothy L. Hodgson
    KTT 46.7 H63 2017eb

    When, where, why, and by whom is law used to force desired social change in the name of justice? Why has culture come to be seen as inherently oppressive to women? In this finely crafted book, Dorothy L. Hodgson examines the history of legal ideas and institutions in Tanzania - from customary law to human rights - as specific forms of justice that often reflect elite ideas about gender, culture, and social change. Drawing on evidence from Maasai communities, she explores how the legacies of colonial law-making continue to influence contemporary efforts to create laws, codify marriage, criminalize FGM, and contest land grabs by state officials. Despite the easy dismissal by elites of the priorities and perspectives of grassroots women, she shows how Maasai women have always had powerful ways to confront and challenge injustice, express their priorities, and reveal the limits of rights-based legal ideals.


  • Grounded Authority : The Algonquins of Barriere Lake against the State / Shiri Pasternak
    KIC 4396.4 P37 2017eb

    Since Justin Trudeau's election in 2015, Canada has been hailed internationally as embarking on a truly progressive, post-postcolonial era--including an improved relationship between the state and its Indigenous peoples. Shiri Pasternak corrects this misconception, showing that colonialism is very much alive in Canada. From the perspective of Indigenous law and jurisdiction, she tells the story of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, in western Quebec, and their tireless resistance to federal land claims policy. 

    Grounded Authority chronicles the band's ongoing attempts to restore full governance over its lands and natural resources through an agreement signed by settler governments almost three decades ago--an agreement the state refuses to fully implement. Pasternak argues that the state's aversion to recognizing Algonquin jurisdiction stems from its goal of perfecting its sovereignty by replacing the inherent jurisdiction of Indigenous peoples with its own, delegated authority. From police brutality and fabricated sexual abuse cases to an intervention into and overthrow of a customary government, Pasternak provides a compelling, richly detailed account of rarely documented coercive mechanisms employed to force Indigenous communities into compliance with federal policy.

    A rigorous account of the incredible struggle fought by the Algonquins to maintain responsibility over their territory, Grounded Authority provides a powerful alternative model to one nation's land claims policy and a vital contribution to current debates in the study of colonialism and Indigenous peoples in North America and globally.


  • Human rights and cultural diversity : core issues and cases / Andrew Fagan
    K 3240 F34 2017
    How can universal human rights be reconciled with respect for wide cultural differences? This textbook introduces the core issues for students and addresses them through an interdisciplinary analysis of key case studies. Throughout the book, an alternative philosophical framework is offered asa model through which universalism and difference can be reconciled into a single global vision.Helpful student features include:* Core questions: each chapter starts with 10 core questions, which students are invited to answer as they read to put what they learn into practice* Further reading: every chapter ends with suggestions for further reading, to help students deepen their study in particular areas* Two-color layout: blue text boxes and headings draw your attention to important information and make the book easier to read

  • Anthropology and Law : A Critical Introduction / Mark Goodale ; foreword by Sally Engle Merry
    K 487 A57G66 2017eb
    An introduction to the anthropology of law that explores the connections between law, politics, and technology.

    From legal responsibility for genocide to rectifying past injuries to indigenous people, the anthropology of law addresses some of the crucial ethical issues of our day. Over the past twenty-five years, anthropologists have studied how new forms of law have reshaped important questions of citizenship, biotechnology, and rights movements, among many others. Meanwhile, the rise of international law and transitional justice has posed new ethical and intellectual challenges to anthropologists.

    Anthropology and Law provides a comprehensive overview of the anthropology of law in the post-Cold War era. Mark Goodale introduces the central problems of the field and builds on the legacy of its intellectual history, while a foreword by Sally Engle Merry highlights the challenges of using the law to seek justice on an international scale. The book's chapters cover a range of intersecting areas including language and law, history, regulation, indigenous rights, and gender.

    For a complete understanding of the consequential ways in which anthropologists have studied, interacted with, and critiqued, the ways and means of law, Anthropology and Law is required reading.

  • The death penalty : debating the moral, legal, and political issues / edited by Robert M. Baird, Stuart E. Rosenbaum
    KF 9227 C2 D41175 2011
    No Marketing Blurb

  • Forced marriage : introducing a social justice and human rights perspective / edited by Aisha K. Gill and Sundari Anitha
    KD 753 F67 2011
    "Forced Marriage" brings together leading practitioners and researchers from the disciplines of criminology, sociology and law. Together the contributors provide an international, multi-disciplinary perspective that offers a compelling alternative to prevailing conceptualisations of the problem of forced marriage. The volume examines advances in theoretical debates, analyzes existing research and presents new evidence that challenges the cultural essentialism that often characterizes efforts to explain, and even justify, this violation of women's rights. By locating forced marriage within broader debates on violence against women, social justice and human rights, the authors offer an intersectional perspective that can be used to inform both theory and practical efforts to address violence against diverse groups of women. This unique book, which is informed by practitioner insights and academic research, is essential reading for practitioners and students of sociology, criminology, gender studies and law.

  • Food law and regulation for non-lawyers : a US perspective / Marc C. Sanchez
    KF3869

  • Right-to-work laws and the crumbling of American public health / Deborah Wallace, Rodrick Wallace
    KF3389

  • National space legislation : a comparative and evaluative analysis / Annette Froehlich, Vincent Seffinga, editors
    KZD1145

  • The plurality trilemma : a geometry of global legal thought / David Roth-Isigkeit
    KZ1256

  • China and the International Criminal Court / Dan Zhu
    KZ7312

  • The life and death of a treaty : Bermuda 2 / Handley Stevens
    KZ1304

  • Colonial justice and decolonization in the high court of Tanzania, 1920-1971 / Ellen R. Feingold
    KTT328

  • The regulation of securities markets in China / Weiping He
    KNQ1064

  • UNCITRAL model law on secured transactions / United Nations Commission on International Trade Law
    K 1100 U544 2016
    The UNCITRAL Model Law on Secured Transactions (the "Model Law") deals with security interests in all types of tangible and intangible movable property, such as goods, receivables, bank accounts, negotiable instruments, negotiable documents, non-intermediated securities and intellectual property with few exceptions, such as intermediated securities. The Model Law follows a unitary approach using one concept for all types of security interest, a functional approach under which the Model Law applies to all types of transaction that fulfil security purposes, such as a secured loan, retention-of-title sale or financial lease, and a comprehensive approach under which the Model Law applies to all types of asset, secured obligation, borrower and lender. In this way, the Model Law is intended to address the main problem of secured transactions laws around the world, that is, the multiplicity of regimes that creates gaps and inconsistencies.The Model Law includes a set of Model Registry Provisions (the "Model Provisions") that can be implemented in a statute or other type of legal instrument, or in both. The Model Provisions deal with the registration of notices of security interests in a publicly accessible Registry to make a security interest effective against third parties and to provide an objective basis for determining the priority of a security interest over the rights of competing claimants. By providing a transparent, comprehensive and rational legislative framework of secured financing, the Model Law is expected to have a beneficial impact on the availability and the cost of credit, in particular to small and medium-size enterprises in developing countries. This will not only assist in their market inclusion and alleviating poverty, but also contribute to achieving Goal 1 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals on ending poverty. The Model Law is based on the United Nations Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade, the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Secured Transactions, the Supplement on Security Interests in Intellectual Property and the UNCITRAL Guide on the Implementation of a Security Rights Registry. For the treatment of security interests in insolvency, the Model Law relies on the recommendations of the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Secured Transactions and the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Insolvency Law.

  • The conceptual foundations of transitional justice / Colleen Murphy
    K 5250 M87 2017
    Many countries have attempted to transition to democracy following conflict or repression, but the basic meaning of transitional justice remains hotly contested. In this book, Colleen Murphy analyses transitional justice - showing how it is distinguished from retributive, corrective, and distributive justice - and outlines the ethical standards which societies attempting to democratize should follow. She argues that transitional justice involves the just pursuit of societal transformation. Such transformation requires political reconciliation, which in turn has a complex set of institutional and interpersonal requirements including the rule of law. She shows how societal transformation is also influenced by the moral claims of victims and the demands of perpetrators, and how justice processes can fail to be just by failing to foster this transformation or by not treating victims and perpetrators fairly. Her book will be accessible and enlightening for philosophers, political and social scientists, policy analysts, and legal and human rights scholars and activists.

  • The Oxford handbook of the responsibility to protect / edited by Alex J. Bellamy and Tim Dunne
    KZ 4082 O94 2016
    The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) is intended to provide an effective framework for responding to crimes of genocide, ethnic cleansing, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. It is a response to the many conscious-shocking cases where atrocities - on the worst scale - have occurred evenduring the post 1945 period when the United Nations was built to save us all from the scourge of genocide. The R2P concept accords to sovereign states and international institutions a responsibility to assist peoples who are at risk - or experiencing - the worst atrocities. R2P maintains thatcollective action should be taken by members of the United Nations to prevent or halt such gross violations of basic human rights. This Handbook, containing contributions from leading theorists, and practitioners (including former foreign ministers and special advisors), examines the progress that has been made in the last 10 years; it also looks forward to likely developments in the next decade.

  • Canada in the world : comparative perspectives on the Canadian Constitution / edited by Richard Albert, Boston College Law School ; David R. Cameron, Yale University
    KE 4219 C33 2018
    In this volume marking the Sesquicentennial of Confederation in Canada, leading scholars and jurists discuss the evolution of the Canadian Constitution since the British North America Act 1867; the role of the Supreme Court in interpreting the Constitution as a 'living tree' capable of application to new legal issues; and the growing influence of both the Constitution, with its entrenched Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the decisions of the Court on other constitutional courts dealing with a wide range of issues pertaining to human rights and democratic government. The contributors assess how the Canadian Constitution accommodates the cultural diversity of the country's territories and peoples while ensuring the universal applicability of its provisions; the role of the Court in interpreting and applying the Constitution; and the growing global influence of the Constitution and decisions of the Court on legislatures and courts in other countries.

  • Arendt and law / Marco Goldoni, Christopher McCorkindale
    K 230 A74 A74 2017
    The essays selected for this volume demonstrate the importance of law - conceptually, normatively and practically - to a proper understanding of Hannah Arendt's work. Though Arendt herself was not a lawyer, and lacked any legal training, it is remarkable that in each of her guises law plays an often subtle, at times idiosyncratic, but unavoidably vital role. For example, as a journalist, confronting the evil of Adolf Eichmann; or as an essayist, engaged with emerging democracies in the East or their unravelling in the West; or as a political thinker concerned to celebrate and secure the conditions for political action; or as a philosopher, reflecting on man's capacity for judgement. Although Arendt herself never wrote systematically about law her rich insights in this field have been studied closely by scholars and this collection marks the first attempt to gather that work, and to understand it thematically. In so doing, the editors seek to open a dual dialogue: inviting Arendt scholars to uncover what Arendt had to say about law, and legal scholars to evaluate her contribution to the field of law.

  • United States and genocide : (Re)Defining the Relationship / Jeffrey S. Bachman
    K 5302 B33 2018

    There exists a dominant narrative that essentially defines the US' relationship with genocide through what the US has failed to do to stop or prevent genocide, rather than through how its actions have contributed to the commission of genocide. This narrative acts to conceal the true nature of the US' relationship with many of the governments that have committed genocide since the Holocaust, as well as the US' own actions. In response, this book challenges the dominant narrative through a comprehensive analysis of the US' relationship with genocide.

    The analysis is situated within the broader genocide studies literature, while emphasizing the role of state responsibility for the commission of genocide and the crime's ancillary acts. The book addresses how a culture of impunity contributes to the resiliency of the dominant narrative in the face of considerable evidence that challenges it. Bachman's narrative presents a far darker relationship between the US and genocide, one that has developed from the start of the Genocide Convention's negotiations and has extended all the way to present day, as can be seen in the relationships the US maintains with potentially genocidal regimes, from Saudi Arabia to Myanmar.

    This book will be of interest to scholars, postgraduates, and students of genocide studies, US foreign policy, and human rights. A secondary readership may be found in those who study international law and international relations.


  • Common sense and legal judgment : community knowledge, political power, and rhetorical practice / Patricia Cochran
    K 370 C63 2017
    What does it mean when a judge in a court of law uses the phrase "common sense"? Is it a type of evidence or a mode of reasoning? In a world characterized by material and political inequalities, whose common sense should inform the law? Common Sense and Legal Judgment explores this rhetorically powerful phrase, arguing that common sense, when invoked in political and legal discourses without adequate reflection, poses a threat to the quality and legitimacy of legal judgment. Often operating in the service of conservatism, populism, or majoritarianism, common sense can harbour stereotypes, reproduce unjust power relations, and silence marginalized people. Nevertheless, drawing the works of theorists such as Thomas Reid, Antonio Gramsci, and Hannah Arendt into conversation with rulings by the Supreme Court of Canada, Patricia Cochran demonstrates that with careful attention, the democratic, egalitarian, and community-sustaining aspects of common sense can be brought to light. A call for critical self-reflection and the close scrutiny of power relationships and social contexts, this book is a direct response to social justice predicaments and their confounding relationships to law. Creative and interdisciplinary, Common Sense and Legal Judgment reinvigorates feminist and anti-poverty understandings of judgment, knowledge, justice, and accountability.

  • The crown and constitutional law / Peter W. Noonan
    KE 4705 N66 2017

  • Stand your ground : a history of America's love affair with lethal self-defense / Caroline E. Light
    KF 9246 L54 2017
    A history of America's Stand Your Ground gun laws, from Reconstruction to Trayvon Martin

    After a young, white gunman killed twenty-six people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in December 2012, conservative legislators lamented that the tragedy could have been avoided if the schoolteachers had been armed and the classrooms equipped with guns. Similar claims were repeated in the aftermath of other recent shootings--after nine were killed in a church in Charleston, South Carolina, and in the aftermath of the massacre in the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Despite inevitable questions about gun control, there is a sharp increase in firearm sales in the wake of every mass shooting.

    Yet, this kind of DIY-security activism predates the contemporary gun rights movement--and even the stand-your-ground self-defense laws adopted in thirty-three states, or the thirteen million civilians currently licensed to carry concealed firearms. As scholar Caroline Light proves, support for "good guys with guns" relies on the entrenched belief that certain "bad guys with guns" threaten us all.

    Stand Your Ground explores the development of the American right to self-defense and reveals how the original "duty to retreat" from threat was transformed into a selective right to kill. In her rigorous genealogy, Light traces white America's attachment to racialized, lethal self-defense by unearthing its complex legal and social histories--from the original "castle laws" of the 1600s, which gave white men the right to protect their homes, to the brutal lynching of "criminal" Black bodies during the Jim Crow era and the radicalization of the NRA as it transitioned from a sporting organization to one of our country's most powerful lobbying forces.

    In this convincing treatise on the United States' unprecedented ascension as the world's foremost stand-your-ground nation, Light exposes a history hidden in plain sight, showing how violent self-defense has been legalized for the most privileged and used as a weapon against the most vulnerable.
page last updated on: Wednesday 20 June 2018
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