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G - Geography, Anthropology, Recreation - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Geography, Anthropology or Recreation that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Ecotourism's promise and peril a biological evaluation / Daniel T. Blumstein, Benjamin Geffroy, Diogo S. M. Samia, Eduardo Bessa, editors
    G156.5.E26

  • No one eats alone : food as a social enterprise / Michael S. Carolan
    GT2850
    In today's fast-paced, fast food world, everyone seems to be eating alone, all the time--whether it's at their desks or in the car. Michael Carolan argues that needs to change if we want healthy, equitable, and sustainable food. We can no longer afford to ignore human connections as we struggle with dire problems like hunger, obesity, toxic pesticides, antibiotic resistance, depressed rural economies, and low-wage labor. In No One Eats Alone he tells the stories of people getting together to change their relationship to food and to each other--from community farms where suburban moms and immigrant families work side by side, to online exchanges where entrepreneurs share kitchen space, to "hackers" who trade information about farm machinery repairs. This is how real change happens, Carolan contends: when we start acting like citizens first and consumers second.

  • Bike boom : the unexpected resurgence of cycling / Carlton Reid
    GV 1041 R45 2017eb
    Bicycling advocates envision a future in which bikes are a widespread daily form of transportation. While many global cities are seeing the number of bike commuters increase, this future is still far away; at times, urban cycling seems to be fighting for its very survival. Will we ever witness a true "bike boom" in cities? What can we learn from past successes and failures to make cycling safer, easier, and more accessible? Use of bicycles in America and Britain fell off a cliff in the 1950s and 1960s thanks to the rapid rise in car ownership. Urban planners and politicians predicted that cycling would wither to nothing, and they did their level best to bring about this extinction by catering to only motorists. But in the 1970s, something strange happened--bicycling bounced back, first in America and then in Britain.

    In Bike Boom , journalist Carlton Reid uses history to shine a spotlight on the presand demonstrates how bicycling has the potential to grow even further, if the right measures are put in place by the politicians and planners of today and tomorrow. He explores the benefits and challenges of cycling, the roles of infrastructure and advocacy, and what we can learn from cities that have successfully supported and encouraged bike booms, including London; Davis, California; Montreal; Stevenage; Amsterdam; New York; and Copenhagen.

    Given that today's global bicycling "boom" has its roots in the early 1970s, Reid draws lessons from that period. At that time, the Dutch were investing in bike infrastructure and advocacy-- the US and the UK had the choice to follow the Dutch example, but didn't. Reid sets out to discover what we can learn from the history of bike "booms" in this entertaining and thought-provoking book.

  • EarthEd : rethinking education on a changing planet / Erik Assadourian and Lisa Mastny, editors
    GE 70 E27 2017eb
    Earth education is traditionally confined to specific topics: ecoliteracy, outdoor education, environmental science. But in the coming century, on track to be the warmest in human history, every aspect of human life will be affected by our changing planet. Emerging diseases, food shortages, drought, and waterlogged cities are just some of the unprecedented challenges that today's students will face. How do we prepare 9.5 billion people for life in the Anthropocene, to thrive in this uncharted and more chaotic future?

    Answers are being developed in universities, preschools, professional schools, and even prisons around the world. In the latest volume of State of the World , a diverse group of education experts share innovative approaches to teaching and learning in a new era. Topics include systems thinking for kids; the importance of play in early education; social emotional learning; comprehensive sexuality education; indigenous knowledge; sustainable business; medical training to treat the whole person; teaching law in the Anthropocene; and more.

    EarthEd addresses schooling at all levels of development, from preschool to professional. Its lessons can inform teachers, policy makers, school administrators, community leaders, parents, and students alike. And its vision will inspire anyone who wants to prepare students not only for the storms ahead but to become the next generation of sustainability leaders.

  • Ethnic conflict in developing societies : Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, Fiji, and Suriname / Ann Marie Bissessar
    GN495.6

  • Proceedings of the 6th International Conference of Arte-Polis imagining experience: creative tourism and the making of place / Christopher Silver, Lénia Marques, Himasari Hanan, Indah Widiatuti, editors
    G154.9

  • Jérôme Bel : dance, theatre, and the subject / Gerald Siegmund
    GV1588

  • Australian Rules Football During the First World War / Dale Blair and Rob Hess
    GV959.54.A8

  • Sports management as an emerging economic activity : trends and best practices / Marta Peris-Ortiz, José Álvarez-García, María de la Cruz Del Río-Rama, editors
    GV716

  • Debugging game history : a critical lexicon / edited by Henry Lowood and Raiford Guins ; editorial assistant, A.C. Deger
    GV 1469.3 D43 2016eb

  • Super power, spoony bards, and silverware : the Super Nintendo Entertainment System / Dominic Arsenault
    GV 1469.32 A76 2017eb

    This is a book about the Super Nintendo Entertainment System that is not celebratory or self-congratulatory. Most other accounts declare the Super NES the undisputed victor of the "16-bit console wars" of 1989--1995. In this book, Dominic Arsenault reminds us that although the SNES was a strong platform filled with high-quality games, it was also the product of a short-sighted corporate vision focused on maintaining Nintendo's market share and business model. This led the firm to fall from a dominant position during its golden age (dubbed by Arsenault the "ReNESsance") with the NES to the margins of the industry with the Nintendo 64 and GameCube consoles. Arsenault argues that Nintendo's conservative business strategies and resistance to innovation during the SNES years explain its market defeat by Sony's PlayStation.

    Extending the notion of "platform" to include the marketing forces that shape and constrain creative work, Arsenault draws not only on game studies and histories but on game magazines, boxes, manuals, and advertisements to identify the technological discourses and business models that formed Nintendo's Super Power. He also describes the cultural changes in video games during the 1990s that slowly eroded the love of gamer enthusiasts for the SNES as the Nintendo generation matured. Finally, he chronicles the many technological changes that occurred through the SNES's lifetime, including full-motion video, CD-ROM storage, and the shift to 3D graphics. Because of the SNES platform's architecture, Arsenault explains, Nintendo resisted these changes and continued to focus on traditional gameplay genres.


  • Atari age : the emergence of video games in America / Michael Z. Newman
    GV 1469.3 N484 2017eb

    Beginning with the release of the Magnavox Odyssey and Pong in 1972, video games, whether played in arcades and taverns or in family rec rooms, became part of popular culture, like television. In fact, video games were sometimes seen as an improvement on television because they spurred participation rather than passivity. These "space-age pinball machines" gave coin-operated games a high-tech and more respectable profile. In Atari Age , Michael Newman charts the emergence of video games in America from ball-and-paddle games to hits like Space Invaders and Pac-Man , describing their relationship to other amusements and technologies and showing how they came to be identified with the middle class, youth, and masculinity.

    Newman shows that the "new media" of video games were understood in varied, even contradictory ways. They were family fun (but mainly for boys), better than television (but possibly harmful), and educational (but a waste of computer time). Drawing on a range of sources -- including the games and their packaging; coverage in the popular, trade, and fan press; social science research of the time; advertising and store catalogs; and representations in movies and television -- Newman describes the series of cultural contradictions through which the identity of the emerging medium worked itself out. Would video games embody middle-class respectability or suffer from the arcade's unsavory reputation? Would they foster family togetherness or allow boys to escape from domesticity? Would they make the new home computer a tool for education or just a glorified toy? Then, as now, many worried about the impact of video games on players, while others celebrated video games for familiarizing kids with technology essential for the information age.


  • New lines : critical GIS and the trouble of the map / Matthew W. Wilson
    G 70.212 W55 2017

    New Lines takes the pulse of a society increasingly drawn to the power of the digital map, examining the conceptual and technical developments of the field of geographic information science as this work is refracted through a pervasive digital culture. Matthew W. Wilson draws together archival research on the birth of the digital map with a reconsideration of the critical turn in mapping and cartographic thought.

    Seeking to bridge a foundational divide within the discipline of geography--between cultural and human geographers and practitioners of Geographic Information Systems (GIS)--Wilson suggests that GIS practitioners may operate within a critical vacuum and may not fully contend with their placement within broader networks, the politics of mapping, the rise of the digital humanities, the activist possibilities of appropriating GIS technologies, and more.

    Employing the concept of the drawn and traced line, Wilson treads the theoretical terrain of Deleuze, Guattari, and Gunnar Olsson while grounding their thoughts with the hybrid impulse of the more-than-human thought of Donna Haraway. What results is a series of interventions--fractures in the lines directing everyday life--that provide the reader with an opportunity to consider the renewed urgency of forceful geographic representation. These five fractures are criticality, digitality, movement, attention, and quantification. New Lines examines their traces to find their potential and their necessity in the face of our frenetic digital life.


  • Interactive stories and video game art : a storytelling framework for game design / Chris Solarski
    GV 1469.34 A97 S65 2017

    The success of storytelling in games depends on the entire development team--game designers, artists, writers, programmers and musicians, etc.--working harmoniously together towards a singular artistic vision. Interactive Stories and Video Game Art is first to define a common design language for understanding and orchestrating interactive masterpieces using techniques inherited from the rich history of art and craftsmanship that games build upon. Case studies of hit games like The Last of Us , Journey , and Minecraft illustrate the vital components needed to create emotionally-complex stories that are mindful of gaming's principal relationship between player actions and video game aesthetics. This book is for developers of video games and virtual reality, filmmakers, gamification and transmedia experts, and everybody else interested in experiencing resonant and meaningful interactive stories.


  • World regional geography : global patterns, local lives : without subregions / Lydia Mihelič Pulsipher, Geography Professor Emeritus, University of Tennessee, Alex Pulsipher, Geographer and Independent Scholar, Ola Johansson, Geography Professor, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown ; with the assistance of Conrad "Mac" Goodwin, Anthropologist/Archaeologist and Independent Scholar
    G 128 P85 2017b

  • EarthEd : rethinking education on a changing planet / Erik Assadourian, project director ; Erik Assadourian and Lisa Mastny, editors
    GE 70 E184 2017
    Earth education is traditionally confined to specific topics: ecoliteracy, outdoor education, environmental science. But in the coming century, on track to be the warmest in human history, every aspect of human life will be affected by our changing planet. Emerging diseases, food shortages, drought, and waterlogged cities are just some of the unprecedented challenges that today's students will face. How do we prepare 9.5 billion people for life in the Anthropocene, to thrive in this uncharted and more chaotic future?

    Answers are being developed in universities, preschools, professional schools, and even prisons around the world. In the latest volume of State of the World , a diverse group of education experts share innovative approaches to teaching and learning in a new era. Topics include systems thinking for kids; the importance of play in early education; social emotional learning; comprehensive sexuality education; indigenous knowled≥ sustainable business; medical training to treat the whole person; teaching law in the Anthropoce≠ and more.

    EarthEd addresses schooling at all levels of development, from preschool to professional. Its lessons can inform teachers, policy makers, school administrators, community leaders, parents, and students alike. And its vision will inspire anyone who wants to prepare students not only for the storms ahead but to become the next generation of sustainability leaders.

  • Early childhood activities for a greener earth / Patty Born Selly
    GE 77 B67 2012
    More than 100 classroom activities to help children learn about and care for the earth

    Educate young children about the environment through experience and play. These activities encourage children to develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, and joy for nature. Each chapter focuses on a common and important environmental topic--from waste reduction and recycling to air quality, weather and climate change, and energy reduction--and provides information to help you present these topics to children in developmentally appropriate ways. Early Childhood Activities for a Greener Earth will help you excite children, engage families, and encourage your community to be green.


    Early Childhood Activities for a Greener Earth is a 2014 Teachers' Choice Award for the Classroom winner!

  • Captain Cook and the Pacific : art, exploration and empire / John McAleer and Nigel Rigby
    G 420 C65 M32 2017
    British Royal Navy Captain James Cook's voyages of exploration across and around the Pacific Ocean were a marvel of maritime achievement, and provided the first accurate map of the Pacific. The expeditions answered key scientific, economic, and geographic questions, and inspired some of the most influential images of the Pacific made by Europeans. Now readers can immerse themselves in the adventure through the collections of London's National Maritime Museum, which illuminate every aspect of the voyages: oil paintings of lush landscapes, scientific and navigational instruments, ship plans, globes, charts and maps, rare books and manuscripts, coins and medals, ethnographic material, and personal effects. Each artifact holds a story that sheds light on Captain Cook, the crews he commanded, and the effort's impact on world history. Showcasing one of the richest resources of Cook-related material in the world, this publication invites readers to engage with the extraordinary voyages--manifested in material culture--and their continuing significance today.

  • Raindrops roll / April Pulley Sayre
    GB 848 S28 2015
    Discover the wonder of water in this refreshingly fun and fascinating exploration of rain, raindrops, and the water cycle from the creator of Rah, Rah, Radishes! and Go, Go Grapes!

    Raindrops drop. They plop. They patter. They spatter. And in the process, they make the whole world feel fresh and new and clean.

    In this gorgeously photo-illustrated nonfiction picture book, celebrated author April Pulley Sayre sheds new light on the wonders of rain, from the beauty of a raindrop balanced on a leaf to the amazing, never-ending water cycle that keeps our planet in perfect ecological balance.

  • A little bit of dirt : 55+ science and art activities to reconnect children with nature / Asia Citro, MEd
    GV 191.63 C58 2015
    Dandelion Bubbles, Rain Drums, Seed Bomb Lollipops and more!

    Bursting with creative hands-on outdoor science and art activities, A Little Bit of Dirt is full of motivation to get outside and explore. Whether you're investigating the health of your local stream, making beautiful acrylic sunprints with leaves and flowers, running an experiment with your backyard birds, or concocting nature potions, you'll be fostering an important connection with nature. The engaging activities encourage the use of the senses and imagination and are perfect for all ages. Discover more about the natural world waiting just outside your door!

  • I love dirt! : 52 activities to help you and your kids discover the wonders of nature / Jennifer Ward ; foreword by Richard Louv ; illustrations by Susie Ghahremani
    GV 191.63 W36 2008
    I Love Dirt! presents 52 open-ended activities to help you engage your child in the outdoors. No matter what your location--from a small patch of green in the city to the wide-open meadows of the country--each activity is meant to promote exploration, stimulate imagination, and heighten a child's sense of wonder.

    To learn more about the author, Jennifer Ward, visit her website at jenniferwardbooks.com and to learn more about the illustrator, Susie Ghahremani, visit her website at boygirlparty.com.

  • Chinese New Year / Grace Jones
    GT 4905 J66 2017
    Learn about the diverse and vibrant festivals that are celebrated around the world. This series encourages children to consider religious beliefs and cultural practices via easy to read text and informative, full color images.

  • Mindful movement : the evolution of the somatic arts and conscious action / Martha Eddy
    GV 452 E33 2017
    In Mindful Movement , exercise physiologist, somatic therapist, and advocate Martha Eddy uses original interviews, case studies, and practice-led research to define the origins of a new holistic field--somatic movement education and therapy#65533;--and its impact on fitness, ecology, politics, and performance. The book reveals the role dance has played in informing and inspiring the historical and cultural narrative of somatic arts. Providing an overview of the antecedents and recent advances in somatic study and with contributions by diverse experts, Eddy highlights the role of Asian movement, the European physical culture movement and its relationship to the performing arts, and female perspectives in developing somatic movement, somatic dance, social somatics, somatic fitness, somatic dance and spirituality, and ecosomatics.

  • Terrestrial lessons : the conquest of the world as globe / Sumathi Ramaswamy
    G 76.5 I5 R36 2017
    Why and how do debates about the form and disposition of our Earth shape enlightened subjectivity and secular worldliness in colonial modernity? Sumathi Ramaswamy explores this question for British India with the aid of the terrestrial globe, which since the sixteenth century has circulated as a worldly symbol, a scientific instrument, and not least an educational tool for inculcating planetary consciousness.

    In Terrestrial Lessons , Ramaswamy provides the first in-depth analysis of the globe's history in and impact on the Indian subcontinent during the colonial era and its aftermath. Drawing on a wide array of archival sources, she delineates its transformation from a thing of distinction possessed by elite men into that mass-produced commodity used in classrooms worldwide--the humble school globe. Traversing the length and breadth of British India, Terrestrial Lessons is an unconventional history of this master object of pedagogical modernity that will fascinate historians of cartography, science, and Asian studies.

  • Liens de sang : aux origines biologiques de la société humaine / Bernard Chapais ; traduit de l'anglais (Canada) par Hervé Juste
    GN 487 C4314 2015

  • Water is a treasure! = L'eau est un trésor!
    GF 28 C2 W38 2007

  • Power from the earth: geothermal energy. Compiled by Dorothy Campbell Tompkins
    GB 1199.5 T66 1972
page last updated on: Friday 15 December 2017
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