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J - Political Science - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Political Science that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Electronic voting : second International Joint Conference, E-Vote-ID 2017, Bregenz, Austria, October 24-27, 2017, proceedings / Robert Krimmer, Melanie Volkamer, Nadja Braun Binder, Norbert Kersting, Olivier Pereira, Carsten Schürmann (eds.)
    JF1032

  • The Principal Agent Model and the European Union
    JA92

  • Peacebuilding : the twenty years' crisis, 1997-2017 / David Chandler
    JZ5538

  • Neo-Liberalism and Austerity : the Moral Economies of Young People's Health and Well-being / edited by Peter Kelly, Jo Pike
    JC11

  • Media and affective mythologies : discourse, archetypes and ideology in contemporary politics / Darren Kelsey
    JF1525.P8

  • Government 3.0 - next generation government technology infrastructure and services : roadmaps, enabling technologies & challenges / Adegboyega Ojo, Jeremy Millard, editors
    JF1525.A8

  • Elections, voting rules and paradoxical outcomes / William V. Gehrlein, Dominique Lepelley
    JF1001

  • Imbalance and rebalance : to create a new framework of global governance / Yang Li, Xiaojing Zhang
    JZ1329.5

  • Digital world war : Islamists, extremists, and the fight for cyber supremacy / Haroon K. Ullah
    JQ 1852 A91 U45 2017
    A seasoned diplomat with deep knowledge of Islamist politics and digital innovation draws the first clear picture of the unprecedented impact of online networks

    Social media has dominated the discourse of recent events in the Muslim world--from the Arab Spring and its aftermath to ISIS's online recruitment. Yet the roles of social media in these events and the use of the dark web, hacking, and digital attacks have received little attention.

    Haroon Ullah investigates the unprecedented impact of social media across the Middle East, North Africa, and South and Southeast Asia and demonstrates how it has profoundly changed relationships between regimes and peoples, and within populations--mostly, but not always, for the better. He considers its apparent inherently "democratic," anti-establishment revolutionary impact, as well as how religious conservatives and extremists have co-opted various platforms. He goes on to show how political parties, corporations, and governments have learned to exploit digital tools to target and mobilize audiences, to ultimately achieve power and status. Identifying key trends across the Muslim world, Ullah outlines what a proper understanding of social media can teach us about regional and international politics and diplomacy.

  • The changing face of parties and party systems : a study of Israel and India / Sunil K. Choudhary
    JF 2051 C56 2018

    This book focuses on the changes currently redefining parties and party systems in Israel and India with regard to parliamentary democracy, coalitional polity, electoral profiles and social diversity. It compares the nature of parties and party systems in Israel and India since their independence and documents how the societies, states and governments have undergone significant transformations during the long course of their existence. In this regard, it also investigates the many significant similarities and glaring differences between India and Israel as two leading parliamentary democracies.

    Characterizing the transition of two countries' party systems as 'a shift from predominance to pluralism', the book underlines its impact on the societies, democracies and governance of the two parliamentary nations.

    The book combines theoretical underpinnings with an empirical understanding of the subject matter, particularly the parties, leaders, state and g

    overnment, pursuing an interdisciplinary approach, which would appeal to a broad readership from academe and industry alike, and a valuable guide for students and scholars of Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, Governance and Law.

  • Sécurité humaine et nouvelle diplomatie : protection des personnes, promotion de la paix / sous la direction de Rob McRae et Don Hubert ; traduit de l'anglais par Aude Burgo, Michel Buttiens, Betty Cohen, Jonathan Felton, François Gauthier, Didier Lafond, et Marie Françoise Lalande
    JZ 6368 H86 2001eb
    Written by diplomatic practitioners, Human Security and the New Diplomacy is a straightforward account of challenges already overcome and the prospect for further progress. From the evolution of peace-keeping, to peacebuilding, humanitarian intervention, war-affected children, international humanitarian law, the International Criminal Court, the economic agendas of conflict, transnational crime, and the emergence of connectivity and a global civil society, the authors offer new insights into the importance of considering these issues as part of a single agenda. Human Security and the New Diplomacy is a case-study of a major Canadian foreign policy initiative and a detailed account of the first phase of the human security agenda. The story of Canada's leading role in promoting a humanitarian approach to international relations, it will be of interest to foreign policy specialists and students alike. Contributors include David Angell, Alan Bones, Michael Bonser, Terry Cormier, Patricia Fortier, Bob Fowler, Elissa Goldberg, Mark Gwozdecky, Sam Hanson, Paul Heinbecker, Eric Hoskins, Don Hubert, David Lee, Dan Livermore, Jennifer Loten, Rob McRae, Valerie Ooterveld, Victor Rakmil, Darryl Robinson, Jill Sinclair, Michael Small, Ross Snyder, Carmen Sorger, and Roman Waschuk."

  • Soldiers, politicians, and civilians : reforming civil-military relations in democratic Latin America / David Pion-Berlin, Raphael Martínez
    JL 1856 C58 P56 2017
    Are interactions between soldiers, politicians, and civilians improving? Every nation has to come to grips with achieving a more enduring harmony between government, the armed forces, and society if it aspires to strengthen its democracy. While there is an abundance of studies on civil-military affairs, few examine all three of these actors, let alone establish any standards with which to assess whether progress is being made. This ambitious book devises a novel framework equipped with six dimensions, each of which opens a unique window into civil-military affairs, and which form a more integrated view of the subject. Those dimensions are accompanied by a set of benchmarks and metrics that assess progress and compare one country against another. The framework is applied to case studies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay, with the conviction that insights could be gleaned that may be relevant elsewhere. Ultimately, by unpacking the civil-military relation into its various dimensions, this study has shed light on what it takes to transform what was once a politically-minded military into an organization dedicated to serving a democratic state and society.

  • Freedom's progress? : a history of political thought / Gerard Casey
    JC 585 C344 2017

    In Freedom's Progress?, Gerard Casey argues that the progress of freedom has largely consisted in an intermittent and imperfect transition from tribalism to individualism, from the primacy of the collective to the fragile centrality of the individual person and of freedom. Such a transition is, he argues, neither automatic nor complete, nor are relapses to tribalism impossible. The reason for the fragility of freedom is simple: the importance of individual freedom is simply not obvious to everyone. Most people want security in this world, not liberty. 'Libertarians,' writes Max Eastman, 'used to tell us that "the love of freedom is the strongest of political motives," but recent events have taught us the extravagance of this opinion. The "herd-instinct" and the yearning for paternal authority are often as strong. Indeed the tendency of men to gang up under a leader and submit to his will is of all political traits the best attested by history.' The charm of the collective exercises a perennial magnetic attraction for the human spirit. In the 20th century, Fascism, Bolshevism and National Socialism were, Casey argues, each of them a return to tribalism in one form or another and many aspects of our current Western welfare states continue to embody tribalist impulses.

    Thinkers you would expect to feature in a history of political thought feature in this book -- Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, Mill and Marx -- but you will also find thinkers treated in Freedom's Progress? who don't usually show up in standard accounts -- Johannes Althusius, Immanuel Kant, William Godwin, Max Stirner, Joseph Proudhon, Mikhail Bakunin, Pyotr Kropotkin, Josiah Warren, Benjamin Tucker and Auberon Herbert. Freedom's Progress? also contains discussions of the broader social and cultural contexts in which politics takes its place, with chapters on slavery, Christianity, the universities, cities, Feudalism, law, kingship, the Reformation, the English Revolution and what Casey calls Twentieth Century Tribalisms -- Bolshevism, Fascism and National Socialism and an extensive chapter on human prehistory.


  • Methods in analytical political theory / edited by Adrian Blau, King's College, London
    JA 71 M4225 2017
    This is the first book to explain how to use key methods in analytical political theory. The methods discussed include contractualism, reflective equilibrium, positive political theory, thought experiments and ideological analysis. Many discussions of political theory methods describe and justify these methods with little or no discussion of their application, emphasizing 'what is' and 'why do' over 'how to'. This book covers all three. Each chapter explains what kinds of problems in political theory might require researchers to use a particular method, the basic principles behind the method being proposed, and an analysis of how to apply it, including concrete principles of good practice.The book thus summarizes methodological ideas, grouped in one place and made accessible to students, and it makes innovative contributions to research methods in analytical political theory.

  • Critical peace education and global citizenship : narratives from the unofficial curriculum / Rita Verma
    JZ 5534 V47 2017

    Critical Peace Education and Global Citizenship offers narrative accounts representing multiple ways teacher and learner activists have come to realize possibilities for peace and reconciliation through unofficial curricula. With these narratives, the book demonstrates the connections between critical peace education and such crucial issues as human trafficking, gang violence, contested narratives of nationhood and belonging, gender identities, and the significance of mentoring. Through rich examples of pedagogic work, this volume enhances and illustrates critically oriented understandings and interpretations of peace in real classrooms with diverse populations of students. Written primarily for scholars and graduate students working in the fields of educational theory, critical pedagogy, and educational policy, the chapters in this book tell a compelling story about teachers, learners and scholar activists who continue to struggle for the creation of transformative and meaningful sites for peace praxis.


  • Paradox of power : the logics of state weakness in Eurasia / edited by John Heathershaw and Edward Schatz
    JQ 1080 P37 2017
    "State weakness" is seen to be a widespread problem throughout Central Asia and other parts of postsocialist space, and more broadly in areas of the developing world. Challenging the widespread assumption that these "weak states" inevitably slide toward failure, Paradox of Power takes careful stock of the varied experiences of Eurasian states to reveal a wide array of surprising outcomes. The case studies show how states teeter but do not collapse, provide public goods against all odds, interact with societies in creative ways, utilize coercion effectively against internal opponents, and establish practices that are far more durable than the language of "weakness" would allow. While deepening our understanding of the phenomenon in Eurasia in particular, the essays also contribute to more general theories of state weakness.

  • Is political philosophy impossible? : thoughts and behaviour in normative political theory / Jonathan Floyd, University of Bristol
    JA 71 F565 2017
    Political philosophy seems both impossible to do and impossible to avoid. Impossible to do, because we cannot agree on a single set of political principles. Impossible to avoid, because we're always living with some kind of political system, and thus some set of principles. So, if we can't do the philosophy, but can't escape the politics, what are we to do? Jonathan Floyd argues that the answer lies in political philosophy's deepest methodological commitments. First, he shows how political philosophy is practiced as a kind of 'thinking about thinking'. Second, he unpicks the different types of thought we think about, such as considered judgements, or intuitive responses to moral dilemmas, and assesses whether any are fit for purpose. Third, he offers an alternative approach - 'normative behaviourism' - which holds that rather than studying our thinking, we should study our behaviour. Perhaps, just sometimes, actions speak louder than thoughts.

  • International human rights / Jack Donnelly, University of Denver, Daniel J. Whelan, Hendrix College
    JC 571 D753 2017
    International Human Rights examines the ways in which states and other international actors have addressed human rights since the end of World War II. This unique textbook features substantial attention to theory, history, international and regional institutions, and the role of transnational actors in the protection and promotion of human rights. Its purpose is to explore the difficult and contentious politics of human rights, and how those political dimensions have been addressed at the national, regional, and especially international levels.

    The fifth edition is substantially updated, rewritten, and revised throughout, including updates on multilateral institutions (especially the UN's Universal Periodic Review process and the Human Rights Council's Special Procedures mechanisms), regional systems, human rights in foreign policy (including a specific chapter on U.S. foreign policy), humanitarian intervention and the "responsibility to protect," and (anti)terrorism and human rights. The book also includes a new chapter on the unity (indivisibility) of human rights. Chapters include discussion questions, case studies for in-depth examination of topics (including new case studies on the U.N. Special Procedures, Myanmar, and Israeli settlements in West-Bank Palestine), and ten "problems" (including new entries on the war in Syria and hierarchies between human rights) tailored to promote classroom discussion.


  • American political parties under pressure : strategic adaptations for a changing electorate / Chapman Rackaway, Laurie L. Rice, editors
    JK 2261 A57 2018
    This book addresses the changing electoral and political circumstances in which American political parties found themselves during the 2016 election, and the strategic adaptations this new pressure may require. The respective establishments of both major political parties have found themselves facing serious challenges. Some observers wondered if realignment was in progress, and whether the parties could survive. Both grounded in research and accessible to more than just academics, this book provides important insights into how political parties can move forward from 2016.

  • The Oxford handbook of political communication / edited by Kate Kenski and Kathleen Hall Jamieson
    JA 85 P6527 2017
    As a field of rich theoretical development and practical application, political communication has expanded over the past fifty years. Since its development shaped by the turmoil of the World Wars and suspicion of new technologies such as film and radio, the discipline has become a hybrid fieldlargely devoted to connecting the dots between political rhetoric, politicians and leaders, voters' opinions, and media exposure to better understand how any one aspect can affects the others. The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication provides contexts for viewing the field of political communication, examines political discourse, media, and considers political communication's evolution inside the altered political communication landscape. Kate Kenski and Kathleen Hall Jamieson bringtogether some of the most groundbreaking scholars in the field to reflect upon their areas of expertise to address the importance of their areas of study to the field, the major findings to date, including areas of scholarly disagreement, on the topics, the authors' perspectives, and unansweredquestions for future research to address. Their answers reveal that political communication is a hybrid with complex ancestry, permeable boundaries and interests that overlap with those of related fields such as political sociology, public opinion, rhetoric, neuroscience and the new hybrid on thequad, media psychology. This comprehensive review of the political communication literature is designed to become the first reference for scholars and students interested in the study of how, why, when, and with what effect humans make sense of symbolic exchanges about sharing and shared power. The sixty-two chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication contain an overview of past scholarship while providing critical reflection of its relevance in a changing media landscape and offering agendas for future research and innovation.

  • From fascism to populism in history / Federico Finchelstein
    JC 481 F518 2017
    What is fascism and what is populism? What are their connections in history and theory, and how should we address their significant differences? What does it mean when pundits call Donald Trump a fascist, or label as populist politicians who span left and right such as Hugo Ch#65533;vez, Juan Per#65533;n, Rodrigo Duterte, and Marine Le Pen? Federico Finchelstein, one of the leading scholars of fascist and populist ideologies, synthesizes their history in order to answer these questions and offer a thoughtful perspective on how we might apply the concepts today. While they belong to the same history and are often conflated, fascism and populism actually represent distinct political and historical trajectories. Drawing on an expansive history of transnational fascism and postwar populist movements, Finchelstein gives us insightful new ways to think about the state of democracy and political culture on a global scale.

  • Evidence for hope : making human rights work in the 21st century / Kathryn Sikkink
    JC 571 S536 2017

    A history of the successes of the human rights movement and a case for why human rights work

    Evidence for Hope makes the case that, yes, human rights work. Critics may counter that the movement is in serious jeopardy or even a questionable byproduct of Western imperialism. They point out that Guant#65533;namo is still open, the Arab Spring protests have been crushed, and governments are cracking down on NGOs everywhere. But respected human rights expert Kathryn Sikkink draws on decades of research and fieldwork to provide a rigorous rebuttal to pessimistic doubts about human rights laws and institutions. She demonstrates that change comes slowly and as the result of struggle, but in the long term, human rights movements have been vastly effective.

    Attacks on the human rights movement's credibility are based on the faulty premise that human rights ideas emerged in North America and Europe and were imposed on developing southern nations. Starting in the 1940s, Latin American leaders and activists were actually early advocates for the international protection of human rights. Sikkink shows that activists and scholars disagree about the efficacy of human rights because they use different yardsticks to measure progress. Comparing the present to the past, she shows that genocide and violence against civilians have declined over time, while access to healthcare and education has increased dramatically. Cognitive and news biases contribute to pervasive cynicism, but Sikkink's investigation into past and current trends indicates that human rights is not in its twilight. Instead, this is a period of vibrant activism that has made impressive improvements in human well-being.

    Exploring the strategies that have led to real humanitarian gains since the middle of the twentieth century, Evidence for Hope looks at how these essential advances can be supported and sustained for decades to come.


  • Unequivocal justice / Christopher Freiman
    JC 11 F69 2017

    Unequivocal Justice challenges the prevailing view within political philosophy that broadly free market regimes are inconsistent with the basic principles of liberal egalitarian justice. Freiman argues that the liberal egalitarian rejection of free market regimes rests on a crucial methodological mistake. Liberal egalitarians regularly assume an ideal "public interest" model of political behavior and a nonideal "private interest" model of behavior in the market and civil society. Freiman argues that this asymmetrical application of behavioral assumptions biases the analysis and undercuts ideal theoretical treatments of every major liberal egalitarian principle, including political liberty, economic sufficiency, fair opportunity, and social equality. This book reexamines the institutional implications of each of these principles in nonideal conditions, making novel philosophical use of political psychology and public choice economics along the way.


  • Teachers of the people : political education in Rousseau, Hegel, Tocqueville, and Mill / Dana Villa
    JA 71 V56 2017
    2016 witnessed an unprecedented shock to political elites in both Europe and America. Populism was on the march, fueled by a substantial ignorance of, or contempt for, the norms, practices, and institutions of liberal democracy. It is not surprising that observers on the left and right have called for renewed efforts at civic education. For liberal democracy to survive, they argue, a form of political education aimed at "the people" is clearly imperative.

    In Teachers of the People , Dana Villa takes us back to the moment in history when "the people" first appeared on the stage of modern European politics. That moment--the era just before and after the French Revolution--led many major thinkers to celebrate the dawning of a new epoch. Yet these same thinkers also worried intensely about the people's seemingly evident lack of political knowledge, experience, and judgment. Focusing on Rousseau, Hegel, Tocqueville, and Mill, Villa shows how reformist and progressive sentiments were often undercut by skepticism concerning the political capacity of ordinary people. They therefore felt that "the people" needed to be restrained, educated, and guided--by laws and institutions and a skilled political elite. The result, Villa argues, was less the taming of democracy's wilder impulses than a pervasive paternalism culminating in new forms of the tutorial state.
    Ironically, it is the reliance upon the distinction between "teachers" and "taught" in the work of these theorists which generates civic passivity and ignorance. And this, in turn, creates conditions favorable to the emergence of an undemocratic and illiberal populism.

  • The blueprint : conservative parties and their impact on Canadian politics / edited by J.P. Lewis and Joanna Everitt
    JL 197 C75 B58 2017

    In this collection, J.P. Lewis and Joanna Everitt bring together a group of up-and coming-political scientists as well as senior scholars to explore the recent history of the Conservative Party of Canada, covering the pre-merger period (1993-2003) and both the minority and majority governments under Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

    The contributors provide nuanced accounts about the experience of conservatives in Canada which reflect the contemporary evolution of Canadian politics in both policy and practice. They challenge the assumption that Harper's government was built upon traditional "toryism" and reveal the extent to which the agenda of the CPC was shaped by its roots to the Reform and Canadian Alliance Parties. Organized thematically, the volume delves into such topics as interest advocacy, ethno-cultural minorities, gender, the media, foreign policy, and more. The Blueprint showcases the renewed vigour in political studies in Canada while revealing the contradictory story of the modern Conservative Party.


  • The Canadian party system : an analytic history / Richard Johnston
    JL 195 J64 2017

    The Canadian party system is a deviant case among the Anglo-American democracies. Unruly and inscrutable, it is a system that defies logic and classification - until now. In this political science tour de force, Richard Johnston makes sense of the Canadian party system. With a keen eye for history and deft use of recently developed analytic tools, he articulates a series of propositions that underpin the system. For its combination of historical breadth and data-intensive rigour, The Canadian Party System is a rare achievement. Its findings shed light on the main puzzles of the Canadian case, while contesting the received wisdom of the comparative study of parties, elections, and electoral systems elsewhere.


  • The culturalist challenge to liberal republicanism / Michael Lusztig
    JC 423 L87 2017
    It is tempting to think of liberal democracy in terms of immortality. Democracies have survived wars and depressions, Nazis and communists - so much so that at the end of the Cold War Francis Fukuyama famously declared the "end of history." In The Culturalist Challenge to Liberal Republicanism, Michael Lusztig assesses the risks that multiculturalism and other forms of culturalism pose to liberal democracy. Establishing the nature of the current regime and exploring the emergence of a cogent theory of justice grounded in both liberal and republican theory, Lusztig demonstrates the inconsistencies between liberal republicanism and culturalist theories of justice. Exploring both the institutional and cultural effects of the tension between culturalism and liberal republicanism, he seeks a balanced view that falls somewhere between Fukuyama's optimism for regime mortality and the pessimism inherent in the work of more conservative theorists like Samuel Huntington. Lusztig concludes that the narrowness of liberal republican justice is ameliorated by multiculturalism, but the hidden danger is that multiculturalism can serve as a stalking horse for more pernicious agendas. Given the increasing cultural diversity faced by North American and European nations, The Culturalist Challenge to Liberal Republicanism has important implications for political stability in the twenty-first century.

  • Political science in motion / edited by Ramona Coman and Jean-Frederic Morin
    JA 86 P5565 2016

  • Neoliberalism / Julie A. Wilson
    JC 574 W557 2018

    Thanks to the rise of neoliberalism over the past several decades, we live in an era of rampant anxiety, insecurity, and inequality. While neoliberalism has become somewhat of an academic buzzword in recent years, this book offers a rich and multilayered introduction to what is arguably the most pressing issue of our times. Engaging with prominent scholarship in media and cultural studies, as well as geography, sociology, economic history, and political theory, author Julie Wilson pushes against easy understandings of neoliberalism as market fundamentalism, rampant consumerism, and/or hyper-individualism. Instead, Wilson invites readers to interrogate neoliberalism in true cultural studies fashion, at once as history, theory, practice, policy, culture, identity, politics, and lived experience. Indeed, the book#65533;s primary aim is to introduce neoliberalism in all of its social complexity, so that readers can see how neoliberalism shapes their own lives, as well as our political horizons, and thereby start to imagine and build alternative worlds.


  • Constitutional politics and the territorial question in Canada and the United Kingdom : federalism and devolution compared / Michael Keating, Guy Laforest, editors
    JC 311 C646 2018

    This book compares the constitutional politics in Canada and the United Kingdom - two complex, multilevel, plurinational states. While the former is federal and the latter a devolved state, the logic of both systems is similar: to combine unity with diversity. Both are facing similar challenges in a world marked by spatial rescaling, international interdependence and economic and social change. The contributors chart these challenges and the responses of the two countries, covering the meanings of federalism and devolution; the role of the courts; fiscal equalization; welfare; party politics; reform by popular referendum and citizen assemblies; and intergovernmental relations. The book will be of interest to students of federalism and multilevel government, state transformation territorial politics on both sides of the Atlantic.


  • The acceptance of party unity in parliamentary democracies / David M. Willumsen
    JF 2051 W55 2017
    Despite the central role of policy preferences in the subsequent behaviour of legislators, preferences at the level of the individual legislator have been almost entirely neglected in the study of parliaments and legislative behaviour. The main reason for this is the difficulty of obtainingmeasures of legislator preferences that are not based on their behaviour. This book explores direct measures of policy preferences through parliamentary surveys. Building on this, the book develops measures of policy incentives of legislators to dissent from their parliamentary parties, anddemonstrates that preference similarity amongst legislators explains a very substantial proportion of party unity, yet cannot explain all of it. Through a quantitative analysis of the attitudes of legislators to the demands of party unity and what drives these attitudes, the book argues that the reason for the difference between observed unity and the levels of unity which can be explained by preference similarity among legislators, is theconscious acceptance by MPs that the long-term benefits of belonging to a united party (such as increased influence on legislation, lower transaction costs and better chances of gaining office) outweigh the short-terms benefits of always voting for their ideal policy outcome. The volume reinforcesthis argument through the analysis of both open-ended survey questions as well as survey questions on the costs and benefits of belonging to a political party in a legislature.

  • L'Union européenne et le maintien de la paix en Afrique / Antoine Rayroux
    JZ 6377 E97 R39 2017

  • Theories of urban politics / [edited by] Jonathan S. Davies and David L. Imbroscio
    JS 78 T54 2009
    'Anybody who thinks the study of urban politics is stagnating needs to pick up a copy of Theories of Urban Politics . Insightful analysis of scholarship on traditional topics is supplemented by chapters on nontraditional topics, including the new institutionalism, network governance, and urban leadership... If you want to keep up with cutting-edge debates in urban studies, the Davies and Imbroscio volume is essential' - Todd Swanstrom, Saint Louis University

    'Connects the best traditions of urban political theory with important new contributions on emerging themes. This completely revised second edition is an invaluable book for new students and established scholars. It is accessible, theoretically rich, and maps out an exciting and challenging research agenda. It will spend more time open and on the desk, than closed and on the bookshelf!' - Professor Chris Skelcher, University of Birmingham

    'Many colleagues have told us that our edition of Theories of Urban Politics provided great insights and grounding to students and seasoned researchers alike. We are delighted that so able a successor has emerged. Those that study urban politics need to be challenged and inspired by theory and this book delivers a powerful update for urban scholars' - David Judge, Gerry Stoker and Harold Wolman, Editors of the First Edition

    'This long-awaited sequel to the pioneering First Edition updates debates and developments through an excellent collection of entirely new essays contributed by some of the leading academics in the field. A special feature of the volume is that it links concerns in urban politics in North America and Europe. An excellent read' - Professor David Wilson, De Montfort University

    Expanding and updating the successful first edition, Theories of Urban Politics, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to and evaluation of the theoretical approaches to urban governance.

    Restructured into four new parts - Power, Governance, Citizens, and Challenges - the second edition reflects developments in the field over the last decade, with newly commissioned chapters updating and adding to the theoretical material included in the first edition.

    With contributions from many of the key figures in urban theory today, this text will be required reading on all urban politics, urban planning and public administration courses.


  • Forum on Federal Information Policies : the Congressional initiative : the sixth annual forum held March 22, 1989 at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. : a summary of proceedings / written by Douglas Price
    JK 468 S4F67 1989

  • Human rights in the People's Republic of China / Yuan-li Wu [and others]
    JC 599 C6 H86 1988
page last updated on: Friday 15 December 2017
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