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Cinema - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range PN 1993 - PN 1999 (Cinema) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 90 days.


  • Vocal projections : voices in documentary / edited by Annabelle Honess Roe and Maria Pramaggiore
    PN 1995.9 D6 V63 2019eb
    Vocal Projections: Voices in Documentary examines a previously neglected topic in the field of documentary studies: the political, aesthetic, and affective functions that voices assume. On topics ranging from the celebrity voice over to ventriloquism, from rockumentary screams to feminist vocal politics, these essays demonstrate myriad ways in which voices make documentary meaning beyond their expository, evidentiary and authenticating functions.The international range of contributors offers an innovative approach to the issues relating to voices in documentary. While taking account of the existing paradigm in documentary studies pioneered by Bill Nichols, in which voice is equated with political rhetoric and subjective representation, the contributors move into new territory, addressing current and emerging research in voice, sound, music and posthumanist studies.

  • New approaches to cinematic space / edited by Filipa Rosário and Iván Villarmea Álvarez
    PN 1995.9 C513 N49 2019eb

    New Approaches to Cinematic Space aims to discuss the process of creation of cinematic spaces through moving images and the subsequent interpretation of their purpose and meaning. Throughout seventeen chapters, this edited collection will attempt to identify and interpret the formal strategies used by different filmmakers to depict real or imaginary places and turn them into abstract, conceptual spaces. The contributors to this volume will specifically focus on a series of systems of representation that go beyond the mere visual reproduction of a given location to construct a network of meanings that ultimately shapes our spatial worldview.


  • Italian ecocinema beyond the human / Elena Past
    PN 1995.9 E78 P37 2019eb

    Entangled in the hybrid fields of ecomedia studies and material ecocriticism, Elena Past examines five Italian films shot on location and ponders the complex relationships that the production crews developed with the filming locations and the nonhuman cast members. She uses these films--Red Desert (1964), The Winds Blows Round (2005), Gomorrah (2008), Le quattro volte (2010), and Return to the Aeolian Islands (2010)--as case studies to explore pressing environmental questions such as cinema's dependence on hydrocarbons, the toxic waste crisis in the region of Campania, and our reliance on the nonhuman world. Dynamic and unexpected actors emerge as the subjects of each chapter: playful goats, erupting volcanoes, airborne dust particles, fluid petroleum, and even the sound of silence. Based on interviews with crew members and close readings of the films themselves, Italian Ecocinema Beyond the Human theorizes how filmmaking practice--from sound recording to location scouting to managing a production--helps uncover cinema's ecological footprint and its potential to open new perspectives on the nonhuman world.


  • Fatih Akin's cinema and the new sound of Europe / Berna Gueneli
    PN 1998.3 A4358 G84 2019eb

    In Fatih Akın's Cinema and the New Sound of Europe , Berna Gueneli explores the transnational works of acclaimed Turkish-German filmmaker and auteur Fatih Akın. The first minority director in Germany to receive numerous national and international awards, Akın makes films that are informed by Europe's past, provide cinematic imaginations about its present and future, and engage with public discourses on minorities and migration in Europe through his treatment and representation of a diverse, multiethnic, and multilingual European citizenry. Through detailed analyses of some of Akın's key works-- In July , Head-On , and The Edge of Heaven , among others--Gueneli identifies Akın's unique stylistic use of multivalent sonic and visual components and multinational characters. She argues that the soundscapes of Akın's films--including music and multiple languages, dialects, and accents--create an "aesthetic of heterogeneity" that envisions an expanded and integrated Europe and highlights the political nature of Akın's decisions regarding casting, settings, and audio. At a time when belonging and identity in Europe is complicated by questions of race, ethnicity, religion, and citizenship, Gueneli demonstrates how Akın's aesthetics intersect with politics to reshape notions of Europe, European cinema, and cinematic history.


  • Predicting Movie Success at the Box Office / by Barrie Gunter
    PN 1994 G86 2018eb

  • Pier Paolo Pasolini, framed and unframed : a thinker for the twenty-first century / edited by Luca Peretti and Karen T. Raizen
    PN 1998.3 P367 P543 2019eb
    This cross-disciplinary volume, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Framed and Unframed , explores and complicates our understanding of Pasolini today, probing notions of otherness in his works, his media image, and his legacy. Over 40 years after his death Pier Paolo Pasolini continues to challenge and interest us, both in academic circles and in popular discourses. Today his films stand as lampposts of Italian cinematic production, his cinematic theories resonate broadly through academic circles, and his philosophical, essayistic, and journalistic writings-albeit relatively sparsely translated into other languages-are still widely influential. Pasolini has also become an image, a mascot, a face on tote bags, a graffiti image on walls, an adjective (pasolinian). The collected essays push us to consider and reconsider Pasolini, a thinker for the twenty-first century.

  • The city symphony phenomenon : cinema, art, and urban modernity between the wars / edited by Steven Jacobs, Anthony Kinik, and Eva Hielscher
    PN 1995.9 C513 C58 2019eb

  • The nasty woman and the neo femme fatale in contemporary cinema / Agnieszka Piotrowska
    PN 1995.9 W6 P56 2019eb

    The Nasty Woman and the Neo Femme Fatale in Contemporary Cinema puts forward the theoretical notion of the 'nasty woman' as a means of examining female protagonists in contemporary culture and cinema, particularly films directed by women. The phrase is taken from an insult thrown at Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Presidential election debates and reclaimed by the feminists worldwide. The volume also draws from the figure of the femme fatale in film noir.

    Piotrowska presents 'the nasty woman' across cultural and mythical landscape as a figure fighting against the entitlement of the patriarchy. The writer argues that in films such as Zero Dark Thirty , Red Road , Stories We Tell , and even Gone Girl the 'nastiness' of female characters creates a new space for reflection on contemporary society and its struggles against patriarchal systems. The nasty woman or neo femme fatale is a figure who disrupts stable situations and norms; she is pro-active and self-determining, and at times unafraid to use dubious means to achieve her goals. She is often single, but when married she subverts and undermines the fundamental principles of this patriarchal institution.

    For students and researchers in Cultural Studies, Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Film Studies and Psychoanalysis in Film Studies, The Nasty Woman and the Neo Femme Fatale in Contemporary Cinema offers an original way of thinking about female creativity and subjectivity. It is also a proud celebration of feminist and female authorship in contemporary Hollywood.


  • The feeling child : affect and politics in Latin American literature and film / edited by Philippa Page, Inela Selimović, and Camilla Sutherland
    PN 1995.9 C45 F44 2018eb

  • Emotion in animated films / edited by Meike Uhrig
    PN 1997.5 E46 2019eb

  • Allan King : an interview with Bruce Martin and a filmography / edited by Alison Reid
    PN 1998.3 K547 A5 1971

  • Shoot from the heart : successful filmmaking from a Sundance rebel / Diane Bell
    PN 1995.9 P7 B3535 2018
    If you dream of making a movie but don't know where to start or you're afraid that your film will end up being yet another unseen indie, this is the book for you.Based on the real-life experiences of Sundance award-winning screenwriter/director Diane Bell, SHOOT FROM THE HEART will guide you through the process of making an indie film successfully -- from writing a stand-out script to raising finance, from getting the most out of your shoot to planning a profitable release. Broken down into sixteen essential steps, this book provides you with a clear, actionable, real-world plan for turning your filmmaking dream into your reality. The method in this book is available to anyone, anywhere. You don't need a ton of money or industry connections, you just need to be willing to do the work of each step.In this book, you'll find ass-kicking inspiration and motivational tips for the long journey filmmaking is, as well as the practical knowledge and insider's information you need to make it happen. SHOOT FROM THE HEART will empower you to trust your creative instincts and leave you with no excuses for not making the best film you can. This guide is the only one you need if you seriously want to stop talking about making movies and actually make a great one.

  • Directing the documentary / Michael Rabiger
    PN 1995.9 D6 R33 2015eb

    Directing the Documentary, Sixth Editionis the definitive book on the form, offering time-tested principles to help you master the craft. Ideal for documentary courses as well as aspiring and established documentary filmmakers, this book has it all, with in-depth lessons and insider perspectives on every aspect of preproduction, production, and postproduction. Focusing on the hands-on work needed to make your concept a reality, this new edition covers it all, from the fundamental to advanced elements of directing and more. It includes dozens of projects, practical exercises, and thought-provoking questions, and provides best practices for researching and honing your documentary idea, developing a crew, guiding your team, maintaining control throughout the shoot, and much more.

    This new edition features:

    A two-stage cinematic learning process: camera observation skills, then advanced storytelling Dozens of real-world exercises and case studies to demystify production processes and enhance your skills Easy-to-comprehend guidance in the creative, technical, and artistic aspects of directing Fresh coverage of the latest filmmaking technology Expanded sections on grant writing and fundraising, emphasizing proposal and pitching skills A self-assessment of your interviewing skills and expanded coverage of narration-writing A companion website (www.directingthedocumentary.com) that includes handy production checklists and forms, updated projects, exercises, and video examples

    In Directing the Documentary, Sixth EditionMichael Rabiger combines expert advice on the storytelling process and technical aspects of documentary filmmaking with sound commentary on the philosophical underpinnings of the art, providing the practical and holistic understanding you need to become a highly-regarded, original, and ethical contributor to the genre.


  • Gender and the Superhero Narrative / edited by Michael Goodrum, Tara Prescott, and Philip Smith
    PN 1995.9 S76 G46 2018eb

    Contributions by Dorian Alexander, Janine Coleman, Gabriel Gianola, Mel Gibson, Michael Goodrum, Tim Hanley, Vanessa Hemovich, Christina Knopf, Christopher McGunnigle, Samira Nadkarni, Ryan North, Lisa Perdigao, Tara Prescott, Philip Smith, and Maite Ucaregui

    The explosive popularity of San Diego's Comic-Con, Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Rogue One , and Netflix's Jessica Jones and Luke Cage all signal the tidal change in superhero narratives and mainstreaming of what were once considered niche interests.

    Yet just as these areas have become more openly inclusive to an audience beyond heterosexual white men, there has also been an intense backlash, most famously in 2015's Gamergate controversy, when the tension between feminist bloggers, misogynistic gamers, and internet journalists came to a head. The place for gender in superhero narratives now represents a sort of battleground, with important changes in the industry at stake. These seismic shifts--both in the creation of superhero media and in their critical and reader reception--need reassessment not only of the role of women in comics, but also of how American society conceives of masculinity.

    Gender and the Superhero Narrative launches ten essays that explore the point where social justice meets the Justice League. Ranging from comics such as Ms. Marvel , Batwoman: Elegy , and Bitch Planet to video games, Netflix, and cosplay, this volume builds a platform for important voices in comics research, engaging with controversy and community to provide deeper insight and thus inspire change.

  • Screening Trafficking : Prudent or Perilous / Yana Hashamova
    PN 1995.9 H833 H37 2018eb

  • Alice in Pornoland : Hardcore Encounters with the Victorian Gothic / Laura Helen Marks
    PN 1995.9 S45 M27 2018eb

  • The Modern British Horror Film / Steven Gerrard
    PN 1995.9 H6 G385 2017eb
    When you think of British horror films, you might picture the classic Hammer Horror movies, with Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and blood in lurid technicolor. Yet British horror has undergone an astonishing change and resurgence in the twenty-first century, with films that capture instead the anxieties of post-Millennial viewers.

    Tracking the revitalization of the British horror film industry over the past two decades, media expert Steven Gerrard also investigates why audiences have flocked to these movies. To answer that question, he focuses on three major trends: "hoodie horror" movies responding to fears about Britain's urban youth culture; "great outdoors" films where Britain's forests, caves, and coasts comprise a terrifying psychogeography; and psychological horror movies in which the monster already lurks within us.

    Offering in-depth analysis of numerous films, including The Descent , Outpost , and The Woman in Black , this book takes readers on a lively tour of the genre's highlights, while provocatively exploring how these films reflect viewers' gravest fears about the state of the nation. Whether you are a horror buff, an Anglophile, or an Anglophobe, The Modern British Horror Film is sure to be a thrilling read.

  • Rock 'n' Roll Movies / David Sterritt
    PN 1995.9 M86 S75 2017eb
    Rock 'n' Roll Movies presents an eclectic look at the many manifestations of rock in motion pictures, from teen-oriented B-movies to Hollywood blockbusters to avant-garde meditations to reverent biopics to animated shorts to performance documentaries. Acclaimed film critic David Sterritt considers the diverse ways that filmmakers have regarded rock 'n' roll, some cynically cashing in on its popularity and others responding to the music as sincere fans, some depicting rock as harmless fun and others representing it as an open challenge to mainstream norms.

  • Enduring Images : A Future History of New Left Cinema / Morgan Adamson
    PN 1995.9 S6 A33 2018eb

    An integrated look at the political films of the 1960s and '70s and how the New Left transformed cinema

    A timely reassessment of political film culture in the 1960s and '70s, Enduring Images examines international cinematic movements of the New Left in light of sweeping cultural and economic changes of that era. Looking at new forms of cinematic resistance--including detailed readings of particular films, collectives, and movements--Morgan Adamson makes a case for cinema's centrality to the global New Left.

    Enduring Images details how student, labor, anti-imperialist, Black Power, and second-wave feminist movements broke with auteur cinema and sought to forge local and international solidarities by producing political essay films, generating new ways of being and thinking in common. Adamson produces a comparative and theoretical account of New Left cinema that engages with discussions of work, debt, information, and resistance. Enduring Images argues that the cinemas of the New Left are sites to examine, through the lens of struggle, the reshaping of global capitalism during the pivotal moment in which they were made, while at the same time exploring how these movements endure in contemporary culture and politics.

    Including in-depth discussions of Third Cinema in Argentina, feminist cinema in Italy, Newsreel movements in the United States, and cybernetics in early video, Enduring Images is an essential examination of the political films of the 1960s and '70s.


  • Clarence Brown : Hollywood's Forgotten Master / Gwenda Young ; foreword by Kevin Brownlow
    PN 1998.3 B7599 Y68 2018eb

    Greta Garbo proclaimed him as her favorite director. Actors, actresses, and even child stars were so at ease under his direction that they were able to deliver inspired and powerful performances. Academy--Award--nominated director Clarence Brown (1890--1987) worked with some of Hollywood's greatest stars, such as Clark Gable, Joan Crawford, Mickey Rooney, Katharine Hepburn, and Spencer Tracy. Known as the "star maker," he helped guide the acting career of child sensation Elizabeth Taylor (of whom he once said, "she has a face that is an act of God") and discovered Academy--Award--winning child star Claude Jarman Jr. for The Yearling (1946). He directed more than fifty films, including Possessed (1931), Anna Karenina (1935), National Velvet (1944), and Intruder in the Dust (1949), winning his audiences over with glamorous star vehicles, tales of families, communities, and slices of Americana, as well as hard-hitting dramas. Although Brown was admired by peers like Jean Renoir, Frank Capra, and John Ford, his illuminating work and contributions to classic cinema are rarely mentioned in the same breath as those of Hollywood's great directors.

    In this first full-length account of the life and career of the pioneering filmmaker, Gwenda Young discusses Brown's background to show how his hardworking parents and resilient grandparents inspired his entrepreneurial spirit. She reveals how the one--time engineer and World War I aviator established a thriving car dealership, the Brown Motor Car Company, in Alabama -- only to give it all up to follow his dream of making movies. He would not only become a brilliant director but also a craftsman who was known for his innovative use of lighting and composition.

    In a career spanning five decades, Brown was nominated for five Academy Awards and directed ten different actors in Oscar-nominated performances. Despite his achievements and influence, however, Brown has been largely overlooked by film scholars. Clarence Brown: Hollywood's Forgotten Master explores the forces that shaped a complex man -- part--dreamer, part--pragmatist -- who left an indelible mark on cinema.


  • Scenarios II : Signs of Life; Even Dwarfs Started Small; Fata Morgana; Heart of Glass / Werner Herzog ; translated by Krishna Winston and Werner Herzog
    PN 1998.3 H477 H47 2018eb

    The second in a series: the master filmmaker's prose scenarios for four of his notable films

    On the first day of editing Fata Morgana , Werner Herzog recalls, his editor said: "With this kind of material we have to pretend to invent cinema." And this, Herzog says, is what he tries to do every day. In this second volume of his scenarios, the peerless filmmaker's genius for invention is on clear display. Written in Herzog's signature fashion--more prose poem than screenplay, transcribing the vision unfolding before him as if in a dream--the four scenarios here (three never before translated into English) reveal an iconoclastic craftsman at the height of his powers.

    Along with his template for the film poem Fata Morgana (1971), this volume includes the scenarios for Herzog's first two feature films, Signs of Life (1968) and Even Dwarfs Started Small (1970), along with the hypnotic Heart of Glass (1976).

    In a brief introduction, Herzog describes the circumstances surrounding each scenario, inviting readers into the mysterious process whereby one man's vision becomes every viewer's waking dream.


  • The Bad Sixties : Hollywood Memories of the Counterculture, Antiwar, and Black Power Movements / Kristen Hoerl
    PN 1995.2 H64 2018eb

    Ongoing interest in the turmoil of the 1960s clearly demonstrates how these social conflicts continue to affect contemporary politics. In The Bad Sixties: Hollywood Memories of the Counterculture, Antiwar, and Black Power Movements , Kristen Hoerl focuses on fictionalized portrayals of 1960s activism in popular television and film. Hoerl shows how Hollywood has perpetuated politics deploring the detrimental consequences of the 1960s on traditional American values. During the decade, people collectively raised fundamental questions about the limits of democracy under capitalism. But Hollywood has proved dismissive, if not adversarial, to the role of dissent in fostering progressive social change.

    Film and television are salient resources of shared understanding for audiences born after the 1960s because movies and television programs are the most accessible visual medium for observing the decade's social movements. Hoerl indicates that a variety of television programs, such as Family Ties , The Wonder Years , and Law and Order , along with Hollywood films, including Forrest Gump , have reinforced images of the "bad sixties." These stories portray a period in which urban riots, antiwar protests, sexual experimentation, drug abuse, and feminism led to national division and moral decay. According to Hoerl, these messages supply distorted civics lessons about what we should value and how we might legitimately participate in our democracy.

    These warped messages contribute to "selective amnesia," a term that stresses how popular media renders radical ideas and political projects null or nonexistent. Selective amnesia removes the spectacular events and figures that define the late-1960s from their motives and context, flattening their meaning into reductive stereotypes. Despite popular television and film, Hoerl explains, memory of 1960s activism still offers a potent resource for imagining how we can strive collectively to achieve social justice and equality.

  • Quentin Tarantino : Poetics and Politics of Cinematic Metafiction / David Roche
    PN 1998.3 T358 R63 2018eb

    Quentin Tarantino's films beg to be considered metafiction: metacommentaries that engage with the history of cultural representations and exalt the aesthetic, ethical, and political potential of creation as re-re-creation and resignification.

    Covering all eight of Quentin Tarantino's films according to certain themes, David Roche combines cultural studies and neoformalist approaches to highlight how closely the films' poetics and politics are intertwined. Each in-depth chapter focuses on a salient feature, some which have drawn much attention (history, race, gender, violence), others less so (narrative structure, style, music, theatricality).

    Roche sets Tarantino's films firmly in the legacy of Howard Hawks, Jean-Luc Godard, Sergio Leone, and the New Hollywood, revising the image of a cool pop-culture purveyor that the American director cultivated at the beginning of his career. Roche emphasizes the breadth and depth of his films' engagement with culture, highbrow and lowbrow, screen and print, American, East Asian, and European.

  • The Sound of Things to Come : An Audible History of the Science Fiction Film / Trace Reddell
    PN 1995.9 S26 R435 2018eb

    A groundbreaking approach to sound in sci-fi films offers new ways of construing both sonic innovation and science fiction cinema

    Including original readings of classics like The Day the Earth Stood Still , 2001: A Space Odyssey , Star Wars , and Blade Runner , The Sound of Things to Come delivers a comprehensive history of sound in science fiction cinema. Approaching movies as sound objects that combine cinematic apparatus and consciousness, Trace Reddell presents a new theory of sonic innovation in the science fiction film.

    Reddell assembles a staggering array of movies from sixty years of film history--including classics, blockbusters, B-movies, and documentaries from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Japan, and the Soviet Union--all in service to his powerful conception of sound making as a speculative activity in its own right. Reddell recasts debates about noise and music, while arguing that sound in the science fiction film provides a medium for alien, unknown, and posthuman sound objects that transform what and how we hear.

    Avoiding genre criticism's tendency to obsess over utopias, The Sound of Things to Come draws on film theory, sound studies, and philosophies of technology to advance conversations about the avant-garde, while also opening up opportunities to examine cinematic sounds beyond the screen.


  • Unwhite : Appalachia, Race, and Film / Meredith McCarroll
    PN 1995.9 M67 M33 2018eb

    Appalachia resides in the American imagination at the intersections of race and class in a very particular way, in the tension between deep historic investments in seeing the region as "pure white stock" and as deeply impoverished and backward. Meredith McCarroll's Unwhite analyzes the fraught location of Appalachians within the southern and American imaginaries, building on studies of race in literary and cinematic characterizations of the American South. Not only do we know what "rednecks" and "white trash" are, McCarroll argues, we rely on the continued use of such categories in fashioning our broader sense of self and other. Further, we continue to depend upon the existence of the region of Appalachia as a cultural construct. As a consequence, Appalachia has long been represented in the collective cultural history as the lowest, the poorest, the most ignorant, and the most laughable community. McCarroll complicates this understanding by asserting that white privilege remains intact while Appalachia is othered through reliance on recognizable nonwhite cinematic stereotypes.

    Unwhite demonstrates how typical characterizations of Appalachian people serve as foils to set off and define the "whiteness" of the non-Appalachian southerners. In this dynamic, Appalachian characters become the racial other. Analyzing the representation of the people of Appalachia in films such as Deliverance , Cold Mountain , Medium Cool , Norma Rae , Cape Fear , The Killing Season , and Winter's Bone through the critical lens of race and specifically whiteness, McCarroll offers a reshaping of the understanding of the relationship between racial and regional identities.


  • Working in Hollywood : How the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor / Ronny Regev
    PN 1993.5 U65 R44 2018eb

  • Cinema and the Wealth of Nations : Media, Capital, and the Liberal World System / Lee Grieveson
    PN 1995.9 P6 G75 2017eb
    Cinema and the Wealth of Nations explores how media, principally in the form of cinema, was used during the interwar years by elite institutions to establish and sustain forms of liberal political economy beneficial to their interests. It examines the media produced by institutions such as states, corporations, and investment banks, as well as the emergence of a corporate media industry and system supported by state policy and integral to the establishment of a new consumer system. Lee Grieveson shows how media was used to encode liberal political and economic power during the period that saw the United States eclipse Britain as the globally hegemonic nation and the related inauguration of new forms of liberal economic globalization. But this is not a distant history. Cinema and the Wealth of Nations examines a foundational conjuncture in the establishment of media forms and a media system instrumental in, and structural to, the emergence and expansion of a world system that has been--and continues to be--brutally violent, unequal, and destructive.

  • Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 / Joshua Glick
    PN 1995.9 D6 G54 2018eb
    Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 explores how documentarians working between the election of John F. Kennedy and the Bicentennial created conflicting visions of the recent and more distant American past. Drawing on a wide range of primary documents, Joshua Glick analyzes the films of Hollywood documentarians such as David Wolper and Mel Stuart, along with lesser-known independents and activists such as Kent Mackenzie, Lynne Littman, and Jesús Salvador Treviño. While the former group reinvigorated a Cold War cultural liberalism, the latter group advocated for social justice in a city plagued by severe class stratification and racial segregation. Glick examines how mainstream and alternative filmmakers turned to the archives, civic institutions, and production facilities of Los Angeles in order to both change popular understandings of the city and shape the social consciousness of the nation.

  • Cinema's Military Industrial Complex / edited by Haidee Wasson and Lee Grieveson
    PN 1993.5 U6 C5285 2018eb
    The vast and influential American military has been aided and abetted by cinema since the earliest days of the medium. The army, navy, and air force put films to work in myriad ways, enlisting them to entertain, train, and heal soldiers as well as to propagandize, strategize, spy, map, and develop weapons, from rifles to atomic bombs. Presenting new essays based on archival research, Cinema's Military Industrial Complex addresses the relationship of military cinema to Hollywood, technological innovation, new modes of filmmaking, unique film styles and genres, and the rise of American soft power across the long twentieth century. This rich and timely volume is essential for scholars interested in the military's use of media and the exercise of influence within and beyond American borders.

  • Mock Classicism : Latin American Film Comedy, 1930-1960 / Nilo Couret
    PN 1995.9 C55 C687 2018eb
    In Mock Classicism Nilo Couret presents an alternate history of Latin American cinema that traces the popularity and cultural significance of film comedies as responses to modernization and the forerunners to a more explicitly political New Latin American Cinema of the 1960s. By examining the linguistic play of comedians such as Cantinflas, Oscarito and Grande Otelo, Niní Marshall, and Luis Sandrini, the author demonstrates aspects of Latin American comedy that operate via embodiment on one hand and spatiotemporal emplacement on the other. Taken together, these parallel examples of comedic practice demonstrate how Latin American film comedies produce a "critically proximate" spectator who is capable of perceiving and organizing space and time differently. Combining close readings of films, archival research, film theory, and Latin American history, Mock Classicism rethinks classicism as a discourse that mediates and renders the world and argues that Latin American cinema became classical in distinct ways from Hollywood.

  • Transcendental Style in Film : Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer / Paul Schrader ; with a new Introduction
    PN 1995 S417 2018eb
    With a new introduction, acclaimed director and screenwriter Paul Schrader revisits and updates his contemplation of slow cinema over the past fifty years. Unlike the style of psychological realism, which dominates film, the transcendental style expresses a spiritual state by means of austere camerawork, acting devoid of self-consciousness, and editing that avoids editorial comment. This seminal text analyzes the film style of three great directors--Yasujiro Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Dreyer--and posits a common dramatic language used by these artists from divergent cultures. The new edition updates Schrader's theoretical framework and extends his theory to the works of Andrei Tarkovsky (Russia), Béla Tarr (Hungary), Theo Angelopoulos (Greece), and Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Turkey), among others. This key work by one of our most searching directors and writers is widely cited and used in film and art classes. With evocative prose and nimble associations, Schrader consistently urges readers and viewers alike to keep exploring the world of the art film.

  • Foundational Films : Early Cinema and Modernity in Brazil / Maite Conde
    PN 1993.5 B6 C66 2018eb
    In her authoritative new book, Maite Conde introduces readers to the crucial early years of Brazilian cinema. Focusing on silent films released during the First Republic (1889-1930), Foundational Films explores how the medium became implicated in a larger project to transform Brazil into a modern nation. Analyzing an array of cinematic forms, from depictions of contemporary life and fan magazines, to experimental avant-garde productions, Conde demonstrates the distinct ways in which Brazil's early film culture helped to project a new image of the country.

  • Abbas Kiarostami : Expanded Second Edition / Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa and Jonathan Rosenbaum
    PN 1998.3 K58 S23 2018eb

  • Lana and Lilly Wachowski / by Cael M. Keegan
    PN 1998.3 W33 K44 2018eb

  • Southern History on Screen : Race and Rights, 1976-2016 / edited by Bryan M. Jack
    PN 1995.9 S66 S65 2019eb

    Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach mass audiences, films represent the power to influence and shape the public's understanding of our country's past, creating lasting images -- both real and imagined -- in American culture.

    In Southern History on Screen: Race and Rights, 1976--2016, editor Bryan Jack brings together essays from an international roster of scholars to provide new critical perspectives on Hollywood's relationships between historical films, Southern history, identity, and the portrayal of Jim Crow--era segregation. This collection analyzes films through the lens of religion, politics, race, sex, and class, building a comprehensive look at the South as seen on screen. By illuminating depictions of the southern belle in Gone with the Wind , the religious rhetoric of southern white Christians and the progressive identity of the "white heroes" in A Time to Kill (1996) and Mississippi Burning (1988), as well as many other archetypes found across films, this book explores the intersection between film, historical memory, and southern identity.


  • Late Westerns : The Persistence of a Genre / Lee Clark Mitchell
    PN 1995.9 W4 M575 2018eb
    For more than a century the cinematic Western has been America's most familiar genre, always teetering on the verge of exhaustion and yet regularly revived in new forms. Why does this outmoded vehicle--with the most narrowly based historical setting of any popular genre--maintain its appeal? In Late Westerns Lee Clark Mitchell takes a position against those critics looking to attach "post" to the all-too-familiar genre. For though the frontier disappeared long ago, though men on horseback have become commonplace, and though films of all sorts have always, necessarily, defied generic patterns, the Western continues to enthrall audiences. It does so by engaging narrative expectations stamped on our collective consciousness so firmly as to integrate materials that might not seem obviously "Western" at all.

    Through plot cues, narrative reminders, and even cinematic frameworks, recent films shape interpretive understanding by triggering a long-standing familiarity audiences have with the genre. Mitchell's critical analysis reveals how these films engage a thematic and cinematic border-crossing in which their formal innovations and odd plots succeed deconstructively, encouraging by allusion, implication, and citation the evocation of generic meaning from ingredients that otherwise might be interpreted quite differently. Applying genre theory with close cinematic readings, Mitchell posits that the Western has essentially been "post" all along.

  • Corporeality in Early Cinema : Viscera, Skin, and Physical Form / edited by Marina Dahlquist, Doron Galili, Jan Olsson, and Valentine Robert
    PN 1995.9 B62 C67 2018eb

    Corporeality in Early Cinema inspires a heightened awareness of the ways in which early film culture, and screen praxes overall are inherently embodied. Contributors argue that on- and offscreen (and in affiliated media and technological constellations), the body consists of flesh and nerves and is not just an abstract spectator or statistical audience entity.

    Audience responses from arousal to disgust, from identification to detachment, offer us a means to understand what spectators have always taken away from their cinematic experience. Through theoretical approaches and case studies, scholars offer a variety of models for stimulating historical research on corporeality and cinema by exploring the matrix of screened bodies, machine-made scaffolding, and their connections to the physical bodies in front of the screen.


  • Blockbuster Performances : How Actors Contribute to Cinema's Biggest Hits / Daniel Smith-Rowsey
    PN 1995.9 A26 S55 2018eb
    This book examines performances in the American film industry's highest-earning and most influential films. Countering decades of discourse and the conventional notion that special effects are the real stars of Hollywood blockbusters, this book finds that the acting performances in these big-budget action movies are actually better, and more genre-appropriate, than reputed. It argues that while blockbusters are often edited for speed, thrills, and simplicity, and performances are sometimes tailored to this style, most major productions feature more scenes of stage-like acting than hyper-kinetic action. Knowing this, producers of the world's highest-budgeted motion pictures usually cast strong or generically appropriate actors. With chapters offering unique readings of some of cinema's biggest hits, such as The Dark Knight , Pirates of the Caribbean , Star Wars , Iron Man and The Hunger Games , this unprecedented study sheds new light on the importance of performance in the Hollywood blockbuster.

  • Arab film and video manifestos : forty-five years of the moving image amid revolution / Kay Dickinson
    PN1993.5.A65

  • Action, detection and Shane Black : antiessentialist genre theory and its application / Nils Bothmann
    PN 1995 B68 2018eb

  • Patricia Highsmith on Screen
    PN1993

  • Fifty years of The Battle of Algiers : past as prologue / Sohail Daulatzai
    PN 1997 B27 D38 2016
    The Battle of Algiers, a 1966 film that poetically captures Algerian resistance to French colonial occupation, is widely considered one of the greatest political films of all time. With an artistic defiance that matched the boldness of the anticolonial struggles of the time, it was embraced across the political spectrum--from leftist groups like the Black Panther Party and the Palestine Liberation Organization to right-wing juntas in the 1970s and later, the Pentagon in 2003. With a philosophical nod to Frantz Fanon, Sohail Daulatzai demonstrates that tracing the film's afterlife reveals a larger story about how dreams of freedom were shared and crushed in the fifty years since its release. As the War on Terror expands and the "threat" of the Muslim looms, The Battle of Algiers is more than an artifact of the past--it's a prophetic testament to the present and a cautionary tale of an imperial future, as perpetual war has been declared on permanent unrest.Forerunners: Ideas First is a thought-in-process series of breakthrough digital publications. Written between fresh ideas and finished books, Forerunners draws on scholarly work initiated in notable blogs, social media, conference plenaries, journal articles, and the synergy of academic exchange. This is gray literature publishing: where intense thinking, change, and speculation take place in scholarship.

  • D.W. Griffith, American film master, by Iris Barry ..
    PN 1998 A3 G72 1940

  • Environmental ethics and film / Pat Brereton
    PN 1995.9 E78 B84 2016eb

    Environmental ethics presents and defends a systematic and comprehensive account of the moral relation between human beings and their natural environment and assumes that human behaviour toward the natural world can and is governed by moral norms. In contemporary society, film has provided a powerful instrument for the moulding of such ethical attitudes.

    Through a close examination of the medium, Environmental Ethics and Film explores how historical ethical values can be re-imagined and re-constituted for more contemporary audiences. Building on an extensive back-catalogue of eco-film analysis, the author focuses on a diverse selection of contemporary films which target audiences' ethical sensibilities in very different ways. Each chapter focuses on at least three close readings of films and documentaries, examining a wide range of environmental issues as they are illustrated across contemporary Hollywood films.

    This book is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of environmental communication, film studies, media and cultural studies, environmental philosophy and ethics.


  • Mockumentary comedy : performing authenticity / Richard Wallace
    PN 1995.9 D62 W35 2018eb

  • DVD, Blu-ray and beyond : navigating formats and platforms within media consumption / Jonathan Wroot, Andy Willis, editors
    PN 1995.9 D57 D84 2017eb

  • Finding the Personal Voice in Filmmaking / Erik Knudsen
    PN1995.9.P7

  • Globalization and Latin American cinema : towards a new critical paradigm / Sophia A. McClennen
    PN1993.5.L3 .M34 2018eb

  • Victorian detectives in contemporary culture : beyond Sherlock Holmes / Lucyna Krawczyk-Żywko, editor
    PN 1995.9 D4 V53 2017eb

  • Prostitution and Sex Work in Global Cinema : New Takes on Fallen Women / edited by Danielle Hipkins, Kate Taylor-Jones
    PN1995.9.P76

  • Subversive adaptations : Czech literature on screen behind the Iron Curtain / Petr Bubeníček
    PN1993.5.C9
    This book deals with film adaptations of literary works created in Communist Czechoslovakia between 1954 and 1969, such as The Fabulous World of Jules Verne (Zeman 1958), Marketa Lazarová (Vláčil 1967), and The Joke (Jires 1969). Bubeníček treats a historically significant period around which myths and misinformation have arisen. The book is broad in scope and examines aesthetic, political, social, and cultural issues. It sets out to disprove the notion that the state-controlled film industry behind the Iron Curtain produced only aesthetically uniform works pandering to official ideology. Bubeníček's main aim is to show how the political situation of Communist Czechoslovakia moulded the film adaptations created there, but also how these same works, in turn, shaped the sociocultural conditions of the 1950s and the 1960s.

  • Corporeality in early cinema : viscera, skin, and physical form / edited by Marina Dahlquist, Doron Galili, Jan Olsson, and Valentine Robert
    PN 1995.9 B62 C68 2018

    Corporeality in Early Cinema inspires a heightened awareness of the ways in which early film culture, and screen praxes overall are inherently embodied. Contributors argue that on- and offscreen (and in affiliated media and technological constellations), the body consists of flesh and nerves and is not just an abstract spectator or statistical audience entity.

    Audience responses from arousal to disgust, from identification to detachment, offer us a means to understand what spectators have always taken away from their cinematic experience. Through theoretical approaches and case studies, scholars offer a variety of models for stimulating historical research on corporeality and cinema by exploring the matrix of screened bodies, machine-made scaffolding, and their connections to the physical bodies in front of the screen.


  • Arab film and video manifestos : forty-five years of the moving image amid revolution/ Kay Dickinson
    PN 1993.5 A65 D54 2018

    Arab Film and Video Manifestos presents, in their entirety, five key documents that have fundamentally shaken up and helped change the face of image culture in the Middle East and beyond. The book collects together, for the first time, these influential, collectively written calls and directives that span a fifty-year period and hail from a range of different countries. Each urges a radical rethinking of film and video's role in culture, its relation to politics, and its potential to instigate profound change. Kay Dickinson carefully positions the manifestos within their broader socio-historical contexts and provides supplementary reading and viewing suggestions for readers who cannot access Arabic-language sources.


  • Contemporary Black women filmmakers and the art of resistance / Christina N. Baker
    PN 1995.9 N4 B35 2018
    Christina N. Baker's Contemporary Black Women Filmmakers and the Art of Resistance is the first book-length analysis of representations of Black femaleness in the feature films of Black women filmmakers. These filmmakers resist dominant ideologies about Black womanhood, deliberately and creatively reconstructing meanings of Blackness that draw from their personal experiences and create new symbolic meaning of Black femaleness within mainstream culture. Addressing social issues such as the exploitation of Black women in the entertainment industry, the impact of mass incarceration on Black women, political activism, and violence, these films also engage with personal issues as complex as love, motherhood, and sexual identity. Baker argues that their counter-hegemonic representations have the potential to transform the narratives surrounding Black femaleness. At the intersection of Black feminism and womanism, Baker develops a "womanist artistic standpoint" theory, drawing from the work of Alice Walker, Patricia Hill Collins, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and Kimberlé Crenshaw.
    Analyzing the cultural texts of filmmakers such as Ava DuVernay, Tanya Hamilton, Kasi Lemmons, Gina Prince-Bythewood, and Dee Rees--and including interviews she conducted with three of the filmmakers--Baker emphasizes the importance of applying an intersectional perspective that centers on the shared experiences of Black women and the role of film as a form of artistic expression and a tool of social resistance.

  • New African cinema / Valérie K. Orlando
    PN 1993.5 A35 O75 2017eb
    New African Cinema examines the pressing social, cultural, economic, and historical issues explored by African filmmakers from the early post-colonial years into the new millennium. Offering an overview of the development of postcolonial African cinema since the 1960s, Valérie K. Orlando highlights the variations in content and themes that reflect the socio-cultural and political environments of filmmakers and the cultures they depict in their films.

    Orlando illuminates the diverse themes evident in the works of filmmakers such as Ousmane Sembène's Ceddo (Senegal, 1977), Sarah Maldoror's Sambizanga (Angola, 1972), Assia Djebar's La Nouba des femmes de Mont Chenoua (The Circle of women of Mount Chenoua, Algeria, 1978), Zézé Gamboa's The Hero (Angola, 2004) and Abderrahmane Sissako's Timbuktu (Mauritania, 2014), among others. Orlando also considers the influence of major African film schools and their traditions, as well as European and American influences on the marketing and distribution of African film. For those familiar with the polemics of African film, or new to them, Orlando offers a cogent analytical approach that is engaging.
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