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J - Political Science - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Political Science that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Destination Italy : representing migration in contemporary media and narrative / Emma Bond, Guido Bonsaver and Federico Faloppa (eds.)
    JV 8132 D478 2015eb
    Italy is one of the most recent immigratory destinations in Europe, having long been one of the continent's most important sources of emigration. Due to its strategic position in the Mediterranean, the Italian peninsula is a crossroads of complex transnational movements and represents a unique and dynamic context for the study of contemporary migration and its representation through the diverse channels of media, literature and film.
    The product of a two-year interdisciplinary research project into representations of migration to Italy, this volume brings together scholarly contributions from the fields of migration studies, linguistics, media, literature and film studies as well as essays by practitioners and activists. It provides both a multi-faceted snapshot of how diverse representations of immigration capture experiences and affect decision-making dynamics and an in-depth study of how media, literature and cinema contribute to the public perception of migrants within the destination culture.

  • Heath and Thatcher in opposition Eric Caines
    JN 231 C35 2017eb

  • The Scottish suffragettes and the press / Sarah Pedersen
    JN1341

  • Political advertising in the 2014 European Parliament elections Christina Holtz-Bacha, Edoardo Novelli, Kevin Rafter, editors
    JN 45 P65 2017eb

  • Traveling Irishness in the long nineteenth century / Marguérite Coporaal, Christina Morin, editors
    JV 7711 T62 2017eb

  • The Idea of Governance and the Spirit of Chinese Neoliberalism
    JC574.2.C6

  • Power dynamics and regional security in Latin America Marcial A.G. Suarez, Rafael Duarte Villa, Brigitte Weiffen, editors
    JZ 6009 L29 P69 2017eb

  • 2016 US PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN political communication and practice
    JK 526 2016 U8 2017eb

  • Presidential elections in Mexico : from hegemony to pluralism / Reynaldo Yunuen Ortega Ortiz
    JL1292

  • The Palgrave handbook of security, risk and intelligence Robert Dover, Huw Dylan, Michael S. Goodman, editors
    JF1525.I6

  • The EU in UN politics : actors, processes and performances / Spyros Blavoukos, Dimitrios Bourantonis, editors
    JZ 4997.5 E87 E8 2017eb

    The book assesses the EU performance in the broader UN setting after the Lisbon Treaty. Distinguished scholars with expertise in EU-UN relations use a comprehensive analytical framework of performance to examine various aspects of the complex EU engagement in UN politics. Performance goes beyond the achievement of agreed-upon objectives and engulfs the underlying, intra-organizational, agreement-reaching processes. The contributors examine the output of the intra-EU policy-making process and its impact within the UN setting. They cover thematic areas of special importance for the EU such as environment, human rights, disarmament and peacekeeping operations as well as special UN bodies and forums where the EU is particularly active, such as the UN General Assembly and its main Committees, the International Labour Organisation, UNESCO and the Non-Proliferation Review Conferences.


  • Public Sector Reform in Ireland : countering crisis / Muiris MacCarthaigh
    JN1425

  • The new Roberts court, Donald Trump, and our failing constitution Stephen M. Feldman
    JK275

  • Democracy, constitutionalism, and politics in Africa : historical contexts, developments, and dilemmas / edited by Eunice N. Sahle
    JQ1879.A15
    This volume explores contemporary political developments in various parts of Africa in the age of democracy, constitutionalism, the securitization of development, and global terrorism. The contributions by leading observers of constitutionalism and African politics in the context of a global political and economic system provide a nuanced understanding of important themes in contemporary African politics: constitutionalism, democratic politics and governance, women's rights, the African Union, securitization of development, civil society, and debates concerning global terrorism and the war on terror. As such, it will be of great interest to scholars, civil society organizations, and public policy makers interested in contemporary African politics.

  • Civil disobedience in global perspective : decency and dissent over borders, inequities, and government secrecy / Michael Allen
    JC328.3

  • Corruption control in post-reform China a social censure perspective / Guoping Jiang
    JQ1509.5.C6

  • Active citizenship in Europe : practices and demands in the EU, Italy, Turkey and the UK / Cristiano Bee
    JN40

  • The legitimation crisis of neoliberalism the State, will-formation, and resistance / Alessandro Bonanno
    JC 574 B66 2017eb

  • Migrant integration between homeland and host society. Anna Di Bartolomeo, Sona Kalantaryan, Justyna Salamońska, Philippe Fargues, editors
    JV6271

  • Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility / Agnieszka Weinar, editor
    JV6271

  • The politics of state expansion : war, state, and society in twentieth-century Britain / James E. Cronin
    JN 309 C76 1991eb
    The expansion of the British state was neither automatic nor accidental. Rather, it was the outcome of recurring battles over the proper boundaries of the state and its role in economy and society. The Politics of State Expansion focuses on the interests arrayed on either side of this struggle; providing a new and critical perspective on the growth of the `Keynsian welfare state' and on the more recent retreat from Keynes and from collective provision.

  • Rethinking China's provinces / edited by John Fitzgerald
    JQ 1519 A598 R47 2003eb
    This is the third volume in a series examining the political importance of China's provinces under reform. The present book provides a survey of provinces as echelons of the peoples Republic of China. It seeks to locate the province as an administrative level in the Chinese state, through an examination of history, economic, social and political developments of these units. By situating the province history, this volume identifies new developments in the territorial administration of the People's Republic over the reform era. It also charts the consequent emergence of the city as an intermediate unit, situated between the province and the country, and providing challenges to the hierarchy of the bureaucratic state. This book includes detailed analyses of Chongqing, Henan, Guangdong, Anhui, Yunnan and Heilongjiang. It contains extensively researched empirical data collected from these provinces, and user friendly maps of these regions.

  • The portable Edmund Burke / edited with an introduction by Isaac Kramnick
    JC 176 B826 1999
    The intellectual wellspring of modern political conservatism, Edmund Burke is also considered a significant figure in aesthetic theory and cultural studies. As a member of the House of Commons during the late eighteenth century, Burke shook Parliament with his powerful defense of the American Revolution and the rights of persecuted Catholics in England and Ireland; his indictment of the English rape of the Indian subcontinent; and, most famously, his denouncement of English Jacobin sympathizers during the French Revolution. The Portable Edmund Burke is the fullest one- volume survey of Burke's thought, with sections devoted to his writings on history and culture, politics and society, the American Revolution, Ireland, colonialism and India, and the French Revolution. This volume also includes excerpts from his letters and an informative Introduction surveying Burke's life, ideas, and his reception and influence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  • The hard road to renewal : Thatcherism and the crisis of the left / Stuart Hall
    JN 1129 C7 H28 1988

  • Immigration, emigration, and migration / edited by Jack Knight
    JV 6483 I55429 2017
    Questions of immigration and border enforcement practices are particularly salient in contemporary public discourse, and examinations of policy and practice bring forth new philosophical quandaries. Why the common assumption that each country has the right to control its own borders? How are laws that restrict or regulate migration created and justified? Why has the criminalization of migration increased? How can migration be better considered through the point of view of the migrants themselves? What are the differences in international and national institutional migratory policy?
    Immigration, Emigration and Migration consists of essays written by distinguished scholars across the fields of law, political science, and philosophy that examine questions of travel and migration across national borders. The volume explores questions of border control and enforcement, criminalization of borders, and how to address current debates and changes in regards to migration and immigration. The intersection of analysis and prescription provides both an assessment of current forms of thought or regulation and suggestion of alterations to address the flaws or failures of present approaches. The eight essays in this volume reflect a variety of considerations and explorations across interdisciplinary lines, and provide a new and thought-provoking discussion of policy, practice, and philosophy of migratory and border practices.

  • Cultural remix : theories of politics and the popular / edited by Erica Carter, James Donald, and Judith Squires
    JA 75.7 C84 1995
    What have black hair-styles got to do with politics? Does sex have a history? What effect has the Walkman had on how we listen to music? What have Margaret Thatcher and Ruth Ellis got in common?

  • Perception and misperception in international politics : with a new preface by the author. / Robert Jervis
    JZ 1234 J47 2017

    Since its original publication in 1976, Perception and Misperception in International Politics has become a landmark book in its field, hailed by the New York Times as "the seminal statement of principles underlying political psychology." This new edition includes an extensive preface by the author reflecting on the book's lasting impact and legacy, particularly in the application of cognitive psychology to political decision making, and brings that analysis up to date by discussing the relevant psychological research over the past forty years. Jervis describes the process of perception (for example, how decision makers learn from history) and then explores common forms of misperception (such as overestimating one's influence). He then tests his ideas through a number of important events in international relations from nineteenth- and twentieth-century European history. Perception and Misperception in International Politics is essential for understanding international relations today.


  • How statesmen think : the psychology of international politics / Robert Jervis
    JZ 1253 J47 2017

    Robert Jervis has been a pioneering leader in the study of the psychology of international politics for more than four decades. How Statesmen Think presents his most important ideas on the subject from across his career. This collection of revised and updated essays applies, elaborates, and modifies his pathbreaking work. The result is an indispensable book for students and scholars of international relations.

    How Statesmen Think demonstrates that expectations and political and psychological needs are the major drivers of perceptions in international politics, as well as in other arenas. Drawing on the increasing attention psychology is paying to emotions, the book discusses how emotional needs help structure beliefs. It also shows how decision-makers use multiple shortcuts to seek and process information when making foreign policy and national security judgments. For example, the desire to conserve cognitive resources can cause decision-makers to look at misleading indicators of military strength, and psychological pressures can lead them to run particularly high risks. The book also looks at how deterrent threats and counterpart promises often fail because they are misperceived.

    How Statesmen Think examines how these processes play out in many situations that arise in foreign and security policy, including the threat of inadvertent war, the development of domino beliefs, the formation and role of national identities, and conflicts between intelligence organizations and policymakers.


  • Rebel power : why national movements compete, fight, and win / Peter Krause
    JC 311 K736 2017

    Many of the world's states--from Algeria to Ireland to the United States--are the result of robust national movements that achieved independence. Many other national movements have failed in their attempts to achieve statehood, including the Basques, the Kurds, and the Palestinians. In Rebel Power , Peter Krause offers a powerful new theory to explain this variation focusing on the internal balance of power among nationalist groups, who cooperate with each other to establish a new state while simultaneously competing to lead it. The most powerful groups push to achieve states while they are in position to rule them, whereas weaker groups unlikely to gain the spoils of office are likely to become spoilers, employing risky, escalatory violence to forestall victory while they improve their position in the movement hierarchy. Hegemonic movements with one dominant group are therefore more likely to achieve statehood than internally competitive, fragmented movements due to their greater pursuit of victory and lesser use of counterproductive violence.


    Krause conducted years of fieldwork in government and nationalist group archives in the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe, as well as more than 150 interviews with participants in the Palestinian, Zionist, Algerian, and Irish national movements. This research generated comparative longitudinal analyses of these four national movements involving 40 groups in 44 campaigns over a combined 140 years of struggle. Krause identifies new turning points in the history of these movements and provides fresh explanations for their use of violent and nonviolent strategies, as well as their numerous successes and failures. Rebel Power is essential reading for understanding not only the history of national movements but also the causes and consequences of contentious collective action today, from the Arab Spring to the civil wars and insurgencies in Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, and beyond.


  • The world reimagined : Americans and human rights in the twentieth century / Mark Philip Bradley, University of Chicago
    JC 599 U5 B63 2016
    Concerns about rights in the United States have a long history, but the articulation of global human rights in the twentieth century was something altogether different. Global human rights offered individuals unprecedented guarantees beyond the nation for the protection of political, economic, social and cultural freedoms. The World Reimagined explores how these revolutionary developments first became believable to Americans in the 1940s and the 1970s through everyday vernaculars as they emerged in political and legal thought, photography, film, novels, memoirs and soundscapes. Together, they offered fundamentally novel ways for Americans to understand what it means to feel free, culminating in today's ubiquitous moral language of human rights. Set against a sweeping transnational canvas, the book presents a new history of how Americans thought and acted in the twentieth-century world.

  • Handbook of research on the facilitation of civic engagement through community art / Leigh Nanney Hersey and Bryna Bobick, [editors]
    JF 799 H354 2007eb
    Outreach and engagement initiatives are crucial in promoting community development. This can be achieved through a number of methods, including avenues in the fine arts. The Handbook of Research on the Facilitation of Civic Engagement through Community Art is a comprehensive reference source for emerging perspectives on the incorporation of artistic works to facilitate improved civic engagement and social justice. Featuring innovative coverage across relevant topics, such as art education, service learning, and student engagement, this handbook is ideally designed for practitioners, artists, professionals, academics, and students interested in active citizen participation via artistic channels.

  • The welfare state : a very short introduction / David Garland
    JC 479 G38 2016
    The programmes that make up the welfare state vary from nation to nation and from time to time, and the balance between markets and government, and free enterprise and social protection is perennially in question. In contemporary political debate the welfare state seems to be mostly viewed asa problem rather than a solution, and welfare programmes appear constantly on the defensive. ThisVery Short Introduction describes the modern welfare state, explaining its historical and contemporary significance and arguing that far from being 'a failure' or 'a problem', welfare states are an essential element of contemporary capitalism, and a vital concomitant of democratic government.In this accessible and entertaining account, David Garland cuts through the fog of misunderstandings to explain in clear and simple terms, what the welfare state is, how it works, and why it matters.ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, andenthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Visionary pragmatism : radical and ecological democracy in neoliberal times / Romand Coles
    JC 423 C6476 2016
    As neoliberal capitalism destroys democracy, commonwealth, and planetary ecology, the need for radically rethinking and generating transformative responses to these catastrophes is greater than ever. Given that, Romand Coles presents an invigorating new mode of scholarship and political practice he calls "visionary pragmatism." Coles explores the profound interrelationships among everyday micropractices of grassroots politics and pedagogy, institutional transformation, and political protest through polyfocal lenses of political and social theory, neuroscience research, complex systems theory, and narratives of his cutting-edge action research. Visionary Pragmatism offers a theory of revolutionary cooptation that, in part, selectively employs practices and strategies of the dominant order to radically alter the coordinates of power and possibility. Underscoring the potential, vitality, and power of emerging democratic practices to change the world, Visionary Pragmatism 's simultaneous theoretical rigor and grounding in actual political and ecological practices provokes and inspires new ways of cocreating knowledge and action in dark times.

  • Two models of government : a new classification of governments in terms of power / Michael Arnheim (Barrister at Law, Sometime Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge)
    JF 51 A765 2016

    This book offers a fresh and original analysis of the power structure of a number of societies, past and present.

    There are and ever have been only two essential models of government: minority rule of all types (labelled "oligocracy") and regimes in which power is concentrated in the hands of a single individual (labelled "monocracy").

    Vaunted democracies are in reality either oligocracies or monocracies. The present-day "democracies" of Britain and the United States are in reality composite oligocracies made up of several disparate elements. Oligocracies are by definition regimes with a high degree of inequality, but with variable levels of liberty. Oligocracy and inequality are the "default" features of human society.

    Equality is unattainable except by a radical monocracy like Fidel Castro's Cuba, and then only with difficulty and at the expense of liberty and probably of lives as well. Equality of opportunity must not be equated with equality. Equality of opportunity means an equal opportunity to become unequal. Paradoxically, however, for genuine equality of opportunity to exist there has to be equality -- which is practically unattainable.

    For genuine freedom of expression to exist there also needs to be equality, because the little man standing on his soap-box and shouting his lungs out at Speaker's Corner in London's Hyde Park cannot compete with the media moguls -- which is why genuine freedom of expression is rare.

    Once these truths are recognised, it becomes clear that for one state to attempt regime change in a foreign country is likely to be futile.


  • Scotland's referendum and the media : national and international perspectives / edited by Neil Blain and David Hutchison, with Gerry Hassan
    JN 1341 S3853 2016
    After the Referendum on whether Scotland should become an independent country in September 2014 - and following a momentous mobilisation of voters by both the Yes and No campaigns - Scotland's political environment has been fundamentally energised. But how was the Referendum campaign reportedand structured in the media in Scotland, the wider United Kingdom, and in other parts of the world, and was it a matter of "construction" rather than "representation"?In this book scholars, commentators and journalists from Britain, Europe and beyond examine how the media across the world presented the debate itself and the shifting nature of Scottish - and British - identity which that debate revealed. Several of the contributors also explore how the emphasesand constructions which were put on the debate in their particular countries illuminated these countries' own responses to nationalism and separatism.The consequences of the Referendum's No result are traced in the media through until the May general election of 2015.

  • The scaffolding of sovereignty : global and aesthetic perspectives on the history of a concept / edited by Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Stefanos Geroulanos, and Nicole Jerr
    JC 327 S325 2017
    What is sovereignty? Often taken for granted or seen as the ideology of European states vying for supremacy and conquest, the concept of sovereignty remains underexamined both in the history of its practices and in its aesthetic and intellectual underpinnings. Using global intellectual history as a bridge between approaches, periods, and areas, The Scaffolding of Sovereignty deploys a comparative and theoretically rich conception of sovereignty to reconsider the different schemes on which it has been based or renewed, the public stages on which it is erected or destroyed, and the images and ideas on which it rests.

    The essays in The Scaffolding of Sovereignty reveal that sovereignty has always been supported, complemented, and enforced by a complex aesthetic and intellectual scaffolding. This collection takes a multidisciplinary approach to investigating the concept on a global scale, ranging from an account of a Manchu emperor building a mosque to a discussion of the continuing power of Lenin's corpse, from an analysis of the death of kings in classical Greek tragedy to an exploration of the imagery of "the people" in the Age of Revolutions. Across seventeen chapters that closely study specific historical regimes and conflicts, the book's contributors examine intersections of authority, power, theatricality, science and medicine, jurisdiction, rulership, human rights, scholarship, religious and popular ideas, and international legal thought that support or undermine different instances of sovereign power and its representations.

  • Queer international relations : sovereignty, sexuality and the will to knowledge / Cynthia Weber
    JZ 1251 W434 2016
    Asked about queer work in international relations, most IR scholars would almost certainly answer that queer studies is a non-issue for the subdiscipline - a topic beyond the scope and understanding of international politics. Yet queer work tackles problems that IR scholars themselves believeare central to their discipline: questions about political economies, the geopolitics of war and terror, and the national manifestations of sexual, racial, and gendered hierarchies, not to mention their implications for empire, globalization, neoliberalism, sovereignty, and terrorism. And since theintroduction of queer work in the 1980s, IR scholars have used queer concepts like "performativity" or "crossing" in relation to important issues like sovereignty and security without acknowledging either their queer sources or their queer function. This agenda-setting book asks how "sexuality" and "queer" are constituted as domains of international political practice and mobilized so that they bear on questions of state and nation formation, war and peace, and international political economy. How are sovereignty and sexuality entangled incontemporary international politics? What understandings of sovereignty and sexuality inform contemporary theories and foreign policies on development, immigration, terrorism, human rights, and regional integration? How specifically is "the homosexual" figured in these theories and policies tosupport or contest traditional understandings of sovereignty? Queer International Relations puts international relations scholarship and transnational/global queer studies scholarship in conversation to address these questions and their implications for contemporary international politics.

  • Political political theory : essays on institutions / Jeremy Waldron
    JA 71 W243 2016

    Political institutions are the main subject of political theory--or they ought to be. Making the case with his trademark forcefulness and intellectual aplomb, Jeremy Waldron argues in favor of reorienting the theory of politics toward the institutions and institutional principles of modern democracy and the mechanisms through which democratic ideals are achieved.

    Too many political theorists are preoccupied with analyzing the nature and importance of justice, liberty, and equality, at the cost of ignoring the governmental institutions needed to achieve them. By contrast, political scientists have kept institutions in view, but they deploy a meager set of value-conceptions in evaluating them. Reflecting on an array of issues about constitutional structure, Waldron considers the uses and abuses of diverse institutions and traditions, from separation of powers and bicameralism to judicial review of legislation, the principle of loyal opposition, the nature of representation, political accountability, and the rule of law. He refines his well-known argument about the undemocratic character of judicial review, providing a capacious perspective on the proper role of courts in a constitutional democracy, and he offers an illuminating critique of the contrasting political philosophies of Hannah Arendt and Isaiah Berlin.

    Even if political theorists remain fixated on expounding the philosophical foundations of democracy, they need to complement their work with a firmer grasp of the structures through which democracy is realized. This is what political political theory means: theory addressing itself to the way political institutions frame political disagreements and orchestrate resolutions to our disputes over social ideals.


  • Migration, terrorism, and the future of a divided Europe : a continent transformed / Christopher Deliso
    JV 7590 D456 2017

    A fundamental resource for anyone interested in the long-term ramifications of the European migration crisis, this book objectively assesses how Europe's future course will be impacted by the key security, political, and economic trends and events stemming from the migration crisis.

    * Presents a contextualized, multidisciplinary study of the migrant crisis that covers everything from organized crime and terrorism to media ethics, economic aspects, and the history of ideas

    * Discusses U.S. security and economic interests in Europe, how these interests will be impacted by the crisis, and measures the United States is likely to take to confront challenges

    * Provides insights from an author and journalist who has 15 years of regional experience, has an academic background in European history, and has interviewed European decision makers and practitioners involved with handling the crisis


  • International pecking orders : the politics and practice of multilateral diplomacy / Vincent Pouliot
    JZ 1305 P69 2016
    In any multilateral setting, some state representatives weigh much more heavily than others. Practitioners often refer to this form of diplomatic hierarchy as the 'international pecking order'. This book is a study of international hierarchy in practice, as it emerges out of the multilateral diplomatic process. Building on the social theories of Erving Goffman and Pierre Bourdieu, it argues that diplomacy produces inequality. Delving into the politics and inner dynamics of NATO and the UN as case studies, Vincent Pouliot shows that pecking orders are eminently complex social forms: contingent yet durable; constraining but also full of agency; operating at different levels, depending on issues; and defined in significant part locally, in and through the practice of multilateral diplomacy.

  • Election watchdogs : transparency, accountability and integrity / edited by Pippa Norris and Alessandro Nai
    JF 1001 E334 2017
    Recent decades have seen growing concern regarding problems of electoral integrity. The most overt malpractices used by rulers include imprisoning dissidents, harassing adversaries, coercing voters, vote-rigging counts, and even blatant disregard for the popular vote. Elsewhere minorirregularities are common, exemplified by inaccurate voter registers, maladministration of polling facilities, lack of security in absentee ballots, pro-government media bias, ballot miscounts, and gerrymandering. Serious violations of human rights that undermine electoral credibility are widelycondemned by domestic observers and the international community. Recent protests about integrity have mobilized in countries as diverse as Russia, Mexico, and Egypt. However, long-standing democracies are far from immune to these ills; past problems include the notorious hanging chads in Florida in2000 and more recent accusations of voter fraud and voter suppression during the Obama-Romney contest. When problems come to light, however, is anyone held to account and are effective remedies implemented?In response to these developments, there have been growing attempts to analyze flaws in electoral integrity and transparency using systematic data from cross-national time-series, forensic analysis, field experiments, case studies, and new instruments monitoring mass and elite perceptions ofmalpractices. This volume collects essays from international experts who evaluate the robustness, conceptual validity, and reliability of the growing body of evidence. The essays compare alternative approaches and apply these methods to evaluate the quality of elections in several areas, includingthe United States, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. Election Watchdogs:Transparency, Accountability and Integrity presents new insights into the importance of diverse actors who promote electoral transparency, accountability, and ultimately the integrity of electoral governance.

  • After Europe / Ivan Krastev
    JN 30 K73 2017

    In this provocative book, renowned public intellectual Ivan Krastev reflects on the future of the European Union--and its potential lack of a future. With far-right nationalist parties on the rise across the continent and the United Kingdom planning for Brexit, the European Union is in disarray and plagued by doubts as never before. Krastev includes chapters devoted to Europe's major problems (especially the political destabilization sparked by the more than 1.3 million migrants from the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia), the spread of right-wing populism (taking into account the election of Donald Trump in the United States), and the thorny issues facing member states on the eastern flank of the EU (including the threat posed by Vladimir Putin's Russia). He concludes by reflecting on the ominous political, economic, and geopolitical future that would await the continent if the Union itself begins to disintegrate.


  • The Constitution in a hall of mirrors : Canada at 150 / David E. Smith
    JL 136 S65 2017

    Whether it's the first-past-the-post electoral system or partisan government appointees to the Senate, Canadians want better representation and accountability from the federal government. Before reforms can be enacted, however, it is important to explore and clarify the relationships among Canada's three parliamentary institutions: Crown, Senate, and Commons.

    In The Constitution in a Hall of Mirrors , David E. Smith presents a learned but accessible analysis of the interconnectedness of Canada's parliamentary institutions. Smith argues that Parliament is a unity comprised of three parts and any reforms made to one branch will, whether intended or not, affect the other branches. Through a timely, nuanced, and comprehensive examination of parliamentary debates, committee reports, legal scholarship, and comparative analysis of developments in the United Kingdom, Smith uncovers the substantial degree of ambiguity that exists among Canadians and their calls for structural and operational reforms. By illuminating the symbiotic relationship between the Crown, Senate, and Commons, The Constitution in a Hall of Mirrors brings government reform closer to reality.


  • On liberty, utilitarianism, and other essays / John Stuart Mill ; edited with an introduction and notes by Mark Philp and Frederick Rosen
    JC 585 M62 2015
    'it is only the cultivation of individuality which produces, or can produce, well developed human beings'Mill's four essays, 'On Liberty', 'Utilitarianism', 'Considerations on Representative Government', and 'The Subjection of Women' examine the most central issues that face liberal democratic regimes - whether in the nineteenth century or the twenty-first. They have formed the basis for many of thepolitical institutions of the West since the late nineteenth century, tackling as they do the appropriate grounds for protecting individual liberty, the basic principles of ethics, the benefits and the costs of representative institutions, and the central importance of gender equality in society.These essays are central to the liberal tradition, but their interpretation and how we should understand their connection with each other are both contentious. In their introduction Mark Philp and Frederick Rosen set the essays in the context of Mill's other works, and argue that his conviction inthe importance of the development of human character in its full diversity provides the core to his liberalism and to any defensible account of the value of liberalism to the modern world.ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expertintroductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

  • The limits of state action / Wilhelm von Humboldt ; edited by J.W. Burrow
    JC 501 H813 1993
    The grand, leading principle, towards which every argument . . . unfolded in these pages directly converges, is the absolute and essential importance of human development in its richest diversity.

    This description by Wilhelm von Humboldt of his purpose in writing The Limits of State Action animates John Stuart Mill's On Liberty and serves as its famous epigraph. Seldom has a book spoken so dramatically to another writer. Many commentators even believe that Humboldt's discussion of issues of freedom and individual responsibility possesses greater clarity and directness than Mill's.

    The Limits of State Action, by "Germany's greatest philosopher of freedom," as F. A. Hayek called him, has an exuberance and attention to principle that make it a valuable introduction to classical liberal political thought. It is also crucial for an understanding of liberalism as it developed in Europe at the turn of the nineteenth century. Humboldt explores the role that liberty plays in individual development, discusses criteria for permitting the state to limit individual actions, and suggests ways of confining the state to its proper bounds. In so doing, he uniquely combines the ancient concern for human excellence and the modern concern for what has come to be known as negative liberty.

    J. W. Burrow is Professor of History at the University of Sussex.


  • Welfare state transformations and inequality in OECD countries / Melike Wulfgramm, Tonia Bieber, Stephan Leibfried, editors
    JC 479 W474 2016
    This book analyzes how recent welfare state transformations across advanced democracies have shaped social and economic disparities. The authors observe a trend from a compensatory paradigm towards supply oriented social policy, and investigate how this phenomenon is linked to distributional outcomes. How - and how much - have changes in core social policy fields alleviated or strengthened different dimensions of inequality? The authors argue that while the market has been the major cause of increasing net inequalities, the trend towards supply orientation in most social policy fields has further contributed to social inequality. The authors work from sociological and political science perspectives, examining all of the main branches of the welfare state, from health, education and tax policy, to labour market, pension and migration policy.


  • The unbroken machine : Canada's democracy in action / Dale Smith
    JL 186.5 S62 2017
    What if it is not our political system that is broken, but our understanding of it?



    Everybody thinks that it's the system that's broken in politics; but what if it's not the system that's broken but rather our understanding of it? What if everyone's proposals to make the system "more democratic" only wind up making things worse, and weaken our systems of accountability so much as to make them meaningless? What if it's our own ignorance that is killing democracy in this country?



    Dale Smith looks at the critical gaps in civic literacy that have become endemic within Canadian political culture, wading through buzzwords and meaningless proposals to suggest real solutions. Designed for the lay reader, The Unbroken Machine seeks to explore our lack of civic literacy and show how our system of democracy should work -- if only we were to engage with it the way it was meant to be.

  • Turning to political violence : the emergence of terrorism / Marc Sageman
    JC 328.6 S24 2017

    What motivates those who commit violence in the name of political beliefs? Terrorism today is not solely the preserve of Islam, nor is it a new phenomenon. It emerges from social processes and conditions common to societies throughout modern history, and the story of its origins spans centuries, encompassing numerous radical and revolutionary movements.

    Marc Sageman is a forensic psychiatrist and government counterterrorism consultant whose bestselling books Understanding Terror Networks and Leaderless Jihad provide a detailed, damning corrective to commonplace yet simplistic notions of Islamist terrorism. In a comprehensive new book, Turning to Political Violence , Sageman examines the history and theory of political violence in the West. He excavates primary sources surrounding key instances of modern political violence, looking for patterns across a range of case studies spanning the French Revolution, through late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century revolutionaries and anarchists in Russia and the United States, to the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand and the start of World War I. In contrast to one-dimensional portraits of terrorist "monsters" offered by governments and media throughout history, these accounts offer complex and intricate portraits of individuals engaged in struggles with identity, injustice, and revenge who may be empowered by a sense of love and self-sacrifice.

    Arguing against easy assumptions that attribute terrorism to extremist ideology, and counter to mainstream academic explanations such as rational choice theory, Sageman develops a theoretical model based on the concept of social identity. His analysis focuses on the complex dynamic between the state and disaffected citizens that leads some to disillusionment and moral outrage--and a few to mass murder. Sageman's account offers a paradigm-shifting perspective on terrorism that yields counterintuitive implications for the ways liberal democracies can and should confront political violence.


  • Sovereignty in ruins : a politics of crisis / George Edmondson and Klaus Mladek, editors
    JC 327 S64445 2017
    Featuring essays by some of the most prominent names in contemporary political and cultural theory, Sovereignty in Ruins presents a form of critique grounded in the conviction that political thought is itself an agent of crisis. Aiming to develop a political vocabulary capable of critiquing and transforming contemporary political frameworks, the contributors advance a politics of crisis that collapses the false dichotomies between sovereignty and governmentality and between critique and crisis. Their essays address a wide range of topics, such as the role history plays in the development of a politics of crisis; Arendt's controversial judgment of Adolf Eichmann; Strauss's and Badiou's readings of Plato's Laws ; the acceptance of the unacceptable; the human and nonhuman; and flesh as a biopolitical category representative of the ongoing crisis of modernity. Altering the terms through which political action may take place, the contributors think through new notions of the political that advance countermodels of biopolitics, radical democracy, and humanity.

    Contributors. Judith Butler, George Edmondson, Roberto Esposito, Carlo Galli, Klaus Mladek, Alberto Moreiras, Andrew Norris, Eric L. Santner, Adam Sitze, Carsten Strathausen, Rei Terada, Cary Wolfe

  • Scorecard diplomacy : grading states to influence their reputation and behavior / Judith G. Kelley
    JZ 1305 K42 2017
    What can the international community do when countries would rather ignore a thorny problem? Scorecard Diplomacy shows that, despite lacking traditional force, public grades are potent symbols that can evoke countries' concerns about their reputations and motivate them to address the problem. The book develops an unconventional but careful argument about the growing phenomenon of such ratings and rankings. It supports this by examining the United States' foreign policy on human trafficking using a global survey of NGOs, case studies, thousands of diplomatic cables, media stories, 90 interviews worldwide, and other documents. All of this is gathered together in a format that walks the reader through the mechanisms of scorecard diplomacy, including an assessment of the outcomes. Scorecard Diplomacy speaks both to those keen to understand the pros and cons of US policy on human trafficking and to those interested in the central question of influence in international relations. The book's companion website can be found at www.scorecarddiplomacy.org.

  • Public policy writing that matters / David Chrisinger
    JF 1525 C59 C35 2017

    Students and professionals across a variety of disciplines need to write public policy in a manner that inspires action and genuine change. You may have amazing ideas about how to improve the world, but if you aren't able to communicate these ideas well, they simply won't become reality. In Public Policy Writing That Matters , communications specialist David Chrisinger argues that public policy writing is most persuasive when it tells clear, concrete stories about people doing things. Combining helpful hints and cautionary tales with writing exercises and excerpts from sample policy documents, Chrisinger teaches readers to craft concise, story-driven pieces that exceed the stylistic requirements and limitations of traditional policy writing.

    Too often, public policy writing is convoluted, opaque, and exclusive. Chrisinger, who teaches introductory policy writing courses around the country, offers a step-by-step guide for anyone interested in planning, organizing, developing, writing, and revising accessible public policy. From the most effective use of data visualization, the best way to write a sentence, and the ideal moment to add a compelling anecdote to advice on using facts to strengthen an argument, this little book, inspired by Strunk & White's classic style guide, will allow anyone crafting public policy to make a bigger impact. Aimed at helping students and professionals overcome their default impulses to merely "explain," this book reveals proven, classroom-tested tips for writing sophisticated policy that is also easy to understand.

    This practical, concise handbook will not only aid students throughout graduate school but will also remain a reference to consult throughout their professional careers. A vital tool for any policy writer or analyst, Public Policy Writing That Matters is a book for everyone passionate about using writing to effect real and lasting change.


  • No is not enough : resisting Trump's shock politics and winning the world we need / Naomi Klein
    JC 328.3 K55 2017
    "Trump is extreme but he's not a Martian. He is the logical conclusion of many of the most dangerous trends of the past half-century. He is the personification of the merger of humans and corporations--a one-man megabrand, with wife and children as spin-off brands. This book is to help understand how we arrived at this surreal political moment, how to keep it from getting a lot worse, and how, if we keep our heads, we can flip the script and seize the opportunity to make things a whole lot better in a time of urgent need. A tool-kit for shock-resistance." --from the Introduction

    The election of Donald Trump produced a frightening escalation in a world of cascading crises. The Trump Administration's vision--the deconstruction of the welfare and regulatory state, the unleashing of a fossil fuel frenzy (which requires the sweeping aside of climate science) and an all-out attack on vulnerable communities under the guise of a war on crime and terrorism--will generate wave after wave of crises and shocks around the world, to the economy, to national security, to the environment.

    In No Is Not Enough , Naomi Klein embraces a lively conversation with the reader to expose the forces behind Trump's success and explain why he is not an aberration but the product of our time--Reality TV branding, celebrity obsession and CEO-worship, Vegas and Guantanamo, fake news and vulture bankers all rolled into one. And she shares a bold vision, a clear-eyed perspective on how to break the spell of his shock tactics, counter the rising chaos and divisiveness at home and abroad, and win the world we need.

  • Little bites of big data for public policy / Donald F. Kettl, University of Maryland
    JA 71.7 K47 2018
    Little Bites of Big Data for Public Policy brings to life the quest to make better policy with better evidence. This brief book frames the big puzzles and, through lively stories and clear examples, provides a valuable how-to guide for producing analysis that works--that speaks persuasively to policy makers, in the language they can best hear, on the problems for which they most need answers. Author Donald F. Kettl brings together the cutting-edge streams of data analytics and data visualization to frame the big puzzles and find ways to make the pieces fit together. By taking little bites of a wide variety of useful data, and then by analyzing it in ways that decision makers will find most helpful, analysts can be much more effective in shaping solutions to the most important problems governments face.

  • The EU at a crossroads : challenges and perspectives / edited by Despina Anagnostopoulou, Ioannis Papadopoulos and Lina Papadopoulou
    JN 30 E8148 2016
    "This volume brings together experienced Professors and PhD researchers from all over Europe to summarise the crucial dilemmas that the European Union has to confront during its current multilevel crisis. The chapters are organized into four parts. The first section deals with constitutional issues of the EU, namely multilevel democratic governance, gender equality, and participatory democracy, and the impact of the crisis on them. The second analyses public governance issues, with reference to urban planning as a new policy for the EU, state aid and privatization of public companies, corporate governance principles for public companies, and EU case law on freedom of establishment of companies. The third part discusses certain issues of the EU internal market and external trade, namely the Europeanisation of labour relations, the relation between EU environmental law and international agreements, the dilemma between regionalism and multilateralism in international trade law, and the Eurasian Economic Union. The fourth section explores the Eurozone crisis from different perspectives and areas, namely political philosophy, economics, political science, administrative science, and law."

  • Does democracy matter? : the United States and global democracy support / edited by Amb. Adrian Basora, Agnieszka Marczyk, and Maia Otarashvili
    JZ 1480 D64 2017
    Confidence in the future of democracy has been shaken by the authoritarian resurgence of the past decade, and some now argue that it is not realistic for the US to continue to champion democracy abroad. Does Democracy Matter? provides the conclusions of eleven scholars from widely different backgrounds who ask whether and, if so, how the US should support democracy beyond its own borders. The authors agree that American strategic interests are served in the long run by the spread of democracy abroad, but they differ as to how this support meshes with other national security goals. The concluding chapter outlines a system of triage for realistically assessing where and how such assistance can be effective in promoting US security interests. Contributions by Adrian A. Basora, Sarah Bush, Larry Diamond, Carl Gershman, Nikolas K. Gvosdev, Melinda Haring, Michal Kořan, Richard Kraemer, Agnieszka Marczyk, Tsveta Petrova, and Kenneth Yalowitz.

  • American political thought : an alternative view / edited by Jonathan Keller and Alex Zamalin
    JA 84 U5 A728 2017

    The twenty-first century presents unique political challenges, like increasing concern over racially based police brutality and mass incarceration, continuing economic and gender inequality, the rise of conservative and libertarian politics, and the appropriate role of religion in American politics. Current scholarship in American political thought research neither adequately responds to the contemporary moment in American politics nor fully captures the depth and scope of this rich tradition.

    This collection of essays offers an innovative expansion of the American political tradition. By exposing the major ideas and thinkers of the four major yet still underappreciated alternative traditions of American political thought#65533;African American, feminist, radical and conservative#65533;this book challenges the boundaries of American political thinking about such values like freedom, justice, equality, democracy, economy, rights, identity, and the role of the state in American life. These traditions, the various authors show in different ways, not only present a much fuller and more accurate characterization of what counts as American political thought. They are also especially unique for the conceptual resources they provide for addressing contemporary developments in American politics.

    Offering an original and substantive interpretation of thinkers and movements, American Political Thought will help students understand how to put American political thought into conversation with contemporary debates in political theory.


  • Duress : imperial durabilities in our times / Ann Laura Stoler
    JV 151 S75 2016
    How do colonial histories matter to the urgencies and conditions of our current world? How have those histories so often been rendered as leftovers, as "legacies" of a dead past rather than as active and violating forces in the world today? With precision and clarity, Ann Laura Stoler argues that recognizing "colonial presence" may have as much to do with how the connections between colonial histories and the present are expected to look as it does with how they are expected to be. In Duress , Stoler considers what methodological renovations might serve to write histories that yield neither to smooth continuities nor to abrupt epochal breaks. Capturing the uneven, recursive qualities of the visions and practices that imperial formations have animated, Stoler works through a set of conceptual and concrete reconsiderations that locate the political effects and practices that imperial projects produce: occluded histories, gradated sovereignties, affective security regimes, "new" racisms, bodily exposures, active debris, and carceral archipelagos of colony and camp that carve out the distribution of inequities and deep fault lines of duress today.

  • The enduring debate : classic and contemporary readings in American politics / edited by David T. Canon, John J. Coleman, Kenneth R. Mayer
    JK 21 E53 2018
    The Enduring Debate, Eighth Edition, offers a wide range of readings, with nearly 50 percent new to this edition, on the key topics of the American government course.

  • Permanent campaigning in Canada / edited by Alex Marland, Thierry Giasson, and Anna Lennox Esselment
    JL 193 P47 2017
    Election campaigning never stops. That is the new reality of politics and government in Canada, where everyone from staffers in the Prime Minister's Office to backbench MPs practise political marketing and communication as though each day were a battle to win the news cycle. Permanent Campaigning in Canada examines the growth and democratic implications of political parties' relentless search for votes and popularity and what constant electioneering means for governance. This is the first study of a phenomenon - including the use of public resources for partisan gain - that has become embedded in Canadian politics and government.

  • Why dissent matters : because some people see things the rest of us miss / William Kaplan
    JC 328.3 K367 2017
    Frances Kelsey was a quiet Canadian doctor and scientist who stood up to a huge pharmaceutical company wanting to market a new drug - thalidomide - and prevented an American tragedy. The nature writer Rachel Carson identified an emerging environmental disaster and pulled the fire alarm. Public protests, individual dissenters, judges, and juries can change the world - and they do. A wide-ranging and provocative work on controversial subjects, Why Dissent Matters tells a story of dissent and dissenters - people who have been attacked, bullied, ostracized, jailed, and, sometimes when it is all over, celebrated. William Kaplan shows that dissent is noisy, messy, inconvenient, and almost always time-consuming, but that suppressing it is usually a mistake - it's bad for the dissenter but worse for the rest of us. Drawing attention to the voices behind international protests such as Occupy Wall Street and Boycott, Divest, and Sanction, he contends that we don't have to do what dissenters want, but we should listen to what they say. Our problems are not going away. There will always be abuses of power to confront, wrongs to right, and new opportunities for dissenting voices to say, "Stop, listen to me." Why Dissent Matters may well lead to a different and more just future.

  • Real democracy in the occupy movement : no stable ground / Anna Szolucha
    JF 799 S96 2017

    The liberal representative model of democracy is in a crisis. In protest camps, neighbourhood assemblies and through other non-hierarchical initiatives, the Occupy movement as well as other recent anti-austerity movements are redefining democracy as a positive way to engage with this crisis. The more direct democratic models of organisation that they are employing are not aimed at making the politicians regain their lost public legitimacy. Instead, direct democracy is perceived by these movements as a radical alternative to the established forms of representation. Can direct democracy become an actual alternative to representative democracy?

    This book takes an engaged and in-depth look at the Occupy movement in Ireland and the San Francisco Bay Area in the US in order to present the most up-to-date evidence of the changing nature of popular democratic demands. It takes an insider's perspective to analyse the internal processes and iterations of the movement. Establishing links between social movements and transformations of democracy, as well as underscoring the significance of the recent movements for the future of democracy, this book is essential reading for students, scholars and activists interested in direct democracy, social movements, and radical politics more generally.


  • Evaluating progress in international relations : how do you know? / edited by Annette Freyberg-Inan, Ewan Harrison and Patrick James
    JZ 1242 E975 2017

    This edited volume offers a systematic evaluation of how knowledge is produced by scholarly research into International Relations. The contributors explore three key questions: To what extent is scientific progress and accumulation of knowledge possible? What are the different accounts of how this process takes place? And what are the dominant critiques of these understandings? It is the first publication to survey the full range of perspectives available for evaluating scientific progress as well as dominant critiques of scientism.

    In its second part, the volume applies this range of perspectives to the research program on the democratic peace. It shows what we gain by accommodating and enabling dialogue among the full range of epistemological approaches. The contributors elaborate and defend the epistemological position of sociable pluralism as one that seeks to build bridges between soft positivism, critical theory, and critical realism. The underlying idea is that if the differences between the various approaches used by different communities of researchers can be understood more clearly, this will facilitate meaningful cross-cutting communication, dialogue, and debate and thereby enable us to address real-world problems more effectively.

    This timely and original work will be of great interest to advanced-level students and scholars dealing with philosophy of science and methodological questions in International Relations.


  • Changing communities : stories of migration, displacement and solidarities / Marjorie Mayo
    JV 6225 M39 2017
    Changing Communities brings together policy analysis, theoretical understandings of migration and displacement, and illustrations of the diverse ways in which communities themselves perceive these processes of change. Marjorie Mayo draws from both previous studies and her own original research to examine a range of responses, taking account of the varying possibilities, challenges, and interests involved--both within and between communities, locally and transnationally. The book highlights examples of some of the creative, cultural ways in which communities--including diaspora communities--reflect upon their experiences of change and find modes of responding and expressing their unique voices, in such art forms as poetry, storytelling, and photography.

  • Rule and rupture : state formation through the production of property and citizenship / edited by Christian Lund and Michael Eilenberg
    JC 11 R85 2017

    Rule and Rupture - State Formation Through the Production of Property and Citizenship examines the ways in which political authority is defined and created by the rights of community membership and access to resources.

    Combines the latest theory on property rights and citizenship with extensive fieldwork to provide a more complex, nuanced assessment of political states commonly viewed as "weak," "fragile," and "failed" Contains ten case studies taken from post-colonial settings around the world, including Cambodia, Nepal, Indonesia, Afghanistan, Rwanda, Somalia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Colombia, and Bolivia Characterizes the results of societal ruptures into three types of outcomes for political power: reconstituted and consolidated, challenged, and fragmented Brings together exciting insights from a global group of scholars in the fields of political science, development studies, and geography

  • Natural right and history / by Leo Strauss
    JC 571 S87
    In this classic work, Leo Strauss examines the problem of natural right and argues that there is a firm foundation in reality for the distinction between right and wrong in ethics and politics. On the centenary of Strauss's birth, and the fiftieth anniversary of the Walgreen Lectures which spawned the work, Natural Right and History remains as controversial and essential as ever.

    "Strauss . . . makes a significant contribution towards an understanding of the intellectual crisis in which we find ourselves . . . [and] brings to his task an admirable scholarship and a brilliant, incisive mind."--John H. Hallowell, American Political Science Review

    Leo Strauss (1899-1973) was the Robert Maynard Hutchins Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Political Science at the University of Chicago.
page last updated on: Thursday 21 September 2017
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