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J - Political Science - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Political Science that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Negotiating reconciliation in peacemaking quandaries of relationship building / Valerie Rosoux, Mark Anstey, editors
    JZ5538

  • E-democracy -- privacy-preserving, secure, intelligent e-government services : 7th International Conference, E-Democracy 2017, Athens, Greece, December 14-15, 2017, Proceedings / Sokratis K. Katsikas, Vasilios Zorkadis (eds.)
    JF1525.A8

  • Human duties and the limits of human rights discourse / Eric R. Boot
    JC571

  • Reappraising European IR theoretical traditions / Knud Erik Jørgensen, Audrey Alejandro, Alexander Reichwein, Felix Rösch, Helen Turton
    JZ1305

  • Progressivism and US Foreign Policy between the World Wars edited by Molly Cochran, Cornelia Navari
    JA1

  • Gendered Citizenship Manifestations and Performance / edited by Bishnupriya Dutt, Janelle Reinelt and Shrinkhla Sahai
    JF801

  • The theological basis of liberal modernity in Montesquieu's Spirit of the laws / Thomas L. Pangle
    JC 179 M8 P36 2010

    The Spirit of the Laws --Montesquieu's huge, complex, and enormously influential work--is considered one of the central texts of the Enlightenment, laying the foundation for the liberally democratic political regimes that were to embody its values. In his penetrating analysis, Thomas L. Pangle brilliantly argues that the inherently theological project of Enlightenment liberalism is made more clearly--and more consequentially-- in Spirit than in any other work.

    In a probing and careful reading, Pangle shows how Montesquieu believed that rationalism, through the influence of liberal institutions and the spread of commercial culture, would secularize human affairs. At the same time, Pangle uncovers Montesquieu's views about the origins of humanity's religious impulse and his confidence that political and economic security would make people less likely to sacrifice worldly well-being for otherworldly hopes. With the interest in the theological aspects of political theory and practice showing no signs of diminishing, this book is a timely and insightful contribution to one of the key achievements of Enlightenment thought.


  • The key texts of political philosophy : an introduction / Thomas L. Pangle, University of Texas at Austin, Timothy W. Burns, Baylor University
    JA 71 P3383 2015
    This book introduces readers to analytical interpretation of seminal writings and thinkers in the history of political thought, including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Bible, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx, and Nietzsche. Chronologically arranged, each chapter in the book is devoted to the work of a single thinker. The selected texts together engage with 2000 years of debate on fundamental questions including: what is the purpose of political life? What is justice? What is a right? Do human beings have rights? What kinds of human virtues are there and which regimes best promote them? The difficulty of accessing the texts included in this volume is the result not only of their subtlety but also of the dramatic change in everyday life. The authors shed light on the texts' vocabulary and complexities of thought and help students understand and weigh the various interpretations of each philosopher's thought.

  • Comparative politics / edited by Daniele Caramani
    JA 86 C526 2017
    This exciting and authoritative introduction to comparative politics provides a range of perspectives, methods, and theories at the heart of political systems around the world. With an unparalleled amount of empirical material, this new edition includes a new introductory chapter showing therelevance of comparative politics, more coverage of the Global South, and a new discussion of representation, inclusion, and the varieties of democracy.

  • Free expression and democracy : a comparative analysis / Kevin W. Saunders, Michigan State University
    JC 591 S28 2017
    Free Expression and Democracy takes on the assumption that limits on free expression will lead to authoritarianism or at least a weakening of democracy. That hypothesis is tested by an examination of issues involving expression and their treatment in countries included on The Economist's list of fully functioning democracies. Generally speaking, other countries allow prohibitions on hate speech, limits on third-party spending on elections, and the protection of children from media influences seen as harmful. Many ban Holocaust denial and the desecration of national symbols. Yet, these other countries all remain democratic, and most of those considered rank more highly than the United States on the democracy index. This book argues that while there may be other cultural values that call for more expansive protection of expression, that protection need not reach the level present in the United States in order to protect the democratic nature of a country.

  • Open versus closed : personality, identity, and the politics of redistribution / Christopher D. Johnston, Duke University, Howard Lavine, University of Minnesota, Christopher M. Federico, University of Minnesota
    JA 74.5 J64 2017
    Debates over redistribution, social insurance, and market regulation are central to American politics. Why do some citizens prefer a large role for government in the economic life of the nation while others wish to limit its reach? In Open versus Closed, the authors argue that these preferences are not always what they seem. They show how deep-seated personality traits underpinning the culture wars over race, immigration, law and order, sexuality, gender roles, and religion shape how citizens think about economics, binding cultural and economic inclinations together in unexpected ways. Integrating insights from both psychology and political science - and twenty years of observational and experimental data - the authors reveal the deeper motivations driving attitudes toward government. They find that for politically active citizens these attitudes are not driven by self-interest, but by a desire to express the traits and cultural commitments that define their identities.

  • The political theory of the American founding : natural rights, public policy, and the moral conditions of freedom / Thomas G. West
    JA 84 U6 W47 2017
    This book provides a complete overview of the American Founders' political theory, covering natural rights, natural law, state of nature, social compact, consent, and the policy implications of these ideas. The book is intended as a response to the current scholarly consensus, which holds that the Founders' political thought is best understood as an amalgam of liberalism, republicanism, and perhaps other traditions. West argues that, on the contrary, the foundational documents overwhelmingly point to natural rights as the lens through which all politics is understood. The book explores in depth how the Founders' supposedly republican policies on citizen character formation do not contradict but instead complement their liberal policies on property and economics. Additionally, the book shows how the Founders' embraced other traditions in their politics, such as common law and Protestantism.

  • UN peacekeeping operations and the protection of civilians : saving succeeding generations / Conor Foley
    JZ 6374 F65 2017
    This book is based on the authors experience of working for more than two decades in over thirty conflict and post-conflict zones. It is written for those involved in UN peacekeeping and the protection of civilians. It is intended to be accessible to non- lawyers working in the field who may need to know the applicable legal standards relating to issues such as the use of force and arrest and detention powers on the one hand and the delivery of life-saving assistance according to humanitarian principles on the other. It will also be of interest to scholars and students of peacekeeping, international law and international relations on the practical dilemmas facing those trying to operationalise the various conceptions of 'protection' during humanitarian crises in recent years.

  • Thinking government : public administration and politics in Canada / David Johnson
    JL 75 J645 2017

    Thinking Government: Public Administration and Politics in Canada, Fourth Edition introduces students to power relations between elected politicians and unelected public servants, while also covering important topics such as the institutions of the federal government, financial and human resources management, and accountability and responsibility. Johnson explores the ways that the ideological framework of this country shapes what Canadians, their political parties, and their governments think about policy actions and the responsibilities of public servants.

    The fourth edition is revised and updated throughout, and addresses the legacy of the Harper government on public administration in Canada. Comprehensive pedagogical supports for students highlight key issues in public administration to help connect theories to the reality of practice.


  • The prince / Niccolò Machiavelli ; [translated by N.H. Thomson]
    JC 143 M3813 1992
    Classic guide to acquiring and maintaining political power is refreshing in its directness, yet often disturbing in its cold practicality. Starkly relevant to the political upheavals of the 20th century, this calculating prescription for power remains today, nearly 500 years after it was written, a timely and startling lesson in the practice of autocratic rule.

  • Writing in political science : a brief guide / Mika LaVaque-Manty, Danielle LaVaque-Manty, University of Michigan
    JA 86 L38 2015
    Writing in Political Science: A Brief Guide applies the key concepts of rhetoric and composition - audience, purpose, genre, and credibility - to examples based in political science. It is part of a series of brief, discipline-specific writing guides from Oxford University Press designed fortoday's writing-intensive college courses. The series is edited by Tom Deans (University of Connecticut) and Mya Poe (Northeastern University).

  • The politics of competence : parties, public opinion and voters / Jane Green, University of Manchester, Will Jennings, University of Southampton
    JF 2011 G75 2017
    Using decades of public opinion data from the US, UK, Australia, Germany and Canada, and distinguishing between three concepts - issue ownership, performance and generalised competence - Green and Jennings show how political parties come to gain or lose 'ownership' of issues, how they are judged on their performance in government across policy issues and how they develop a reputation for competence (or incompetence) over a period in office. Their analysis tracks the major events causing people to re-evaluate party reputations and the costs of governing which cause electorates to punish parties in power. They reveal why, when and how these movements in public opinion matter to elections. The implications are important for long-standing debates about performance and partisanship, and reveal that public opinion about party and governing competence is, to a great extent, the product of major shocks and predictable dynamics.

  • On the House : an inside look at the House of Commons / Rob Walsh
    JL 161 W35 2017
    On a day-to-day basis, what does a newly elected Member of Parliament do? How does the House of Commons work? Drawing on his years of service to five majority and three minority parliaments, Rob Walsh shares first-hand insights into the inner workings of the House, beyond the political personalities that dominate its proceedings. Inside this unique public and political institution, laws are made, taxes are imposed, political issues are debated, and the government is held to account on behalf of all Canadians. The House is the national stage on which democracy plays itself out between elections. Neither a procedural manual nor an academic critique, On the House reveals, from Walsh's perspective, the historical origins of the House, its constitutional place in the parliamentary system, the role of committees, legislation, and administration, and its democratic functions. Providing a deeper understanding of both the House's successes and its failures Walsh celebrates the value of parliamentary democracy while acknowledging the continuing challenges that face it. On the House is a direct, accessible, and fascinating reflection on more than twenty years of experience in the House of Commons.

  • Justice across boundaries : whose obligations? / Onora O'Neill
    JZ 1306 O64 2016
    Who ought to do what, and for whom, if global justice is to progress? In this collection of essays on justice beyond borders, Onora O'Neill criticises theoretical approaches that concentrate on rights, yet ignore both the obligations that must be met to realise those rights, and the capacities needed by those who shoulder these obligations. She notes that states are profoundly anti-cosmopolitan institutions, and that even those committed to justice and universal rights often lack the competence and the will to secure them, let alone to secure them beyond their borders. She argues for a wider conception of global justice, in which obligations may be held either by states or by competent non-state actors, and in which borders themselves must meet standards of justice. This rich and wide-ranging collection will appeal to a broad array of academic researchers and advanced students of political philosophy, political theory, international relations and philosophy of law.

  • Ingenious citizenship : recrafting democracy for social change / Charles T. Lee
    JK 1764 L427 2016
    In Ingenious Citizenship Charles T. Lee centers the daily experiences and actions of migrant domestic workers, sex workers, transgender people, and suicide bombers in his rethinking of mainstream models of social change. Bridging cultural and political theory with analyses of film, literature, and ethnographic sources, Lee shows how these abject populations find ingenious and improvisational ways to disrupt and appropriate practices of liberal citizenship. When voting and other forms of civic engagement are unavailable or ineffective, the subversive acts of a domestic worker breaking a dish or a prostitute using the strategies and language of an entrepreneur challenge the accepted norms of political action. Taken to the extreme, a young Palestinian woman blowing herself up in a Jerusalem supermarket questions two of liberal citizenship's most cherished values: life and liberty. Using these examples to critically reinterpret political agency, citizenship practices, and social transformation, Lee reveals the limits of organizing change around a human rights discourse. Moreover, his subjects offer crucial lessons in how to turn even the worst conditions and the most unstable positions in society into footholds for transformative and democratic agency.

  • Governance, natural resources and post-conflict peacebuilding / edited by Carl Bruch, Carroll Muffett and Sandra S. Nichols
    JZ 6300 G68 2016

    When the guns are silenced, those who have survived armed conflict need food, water, shelter, the means to earn a living, and the promise of safety and a return to civil order. Meeting these needs while sustaining peace requires more than simply having governmental structures in place; it requires good governance.

    Natural resources are essential to sustaining people and peace in post-conflict countries, but governance failures often jeopardize such efforts. This book examines the theory, practice, and often surprising realities of post-conflict governance, natural resource management, and peacebuilding in fifty conflict-affected countries and territories. It includes thirty-nine chapters written by more than seventy researchers, diplomats, military personnel, and practitioners from governmental, intergovernmental, and nongovernmental organizations.

    The book highlights the mutually reinforcing relationship between natural resource management and good governance. Natural resource management is crucial to rebuilding governance and the rule of law, combating corruption, improving transparency and accountability, engaging disenfranchised populations, and building confidence after conflict. At the same time, good governance is essential for ensuring that natural resource management can meet immediate needs for post-conflict stability and development, while simultaneously laying the foundation for a sustainable peace. Drawing on analyses of the close relationship between governance and natural resource management, the book explores lessons from past conflicts and ongoing reconstruction efforts; illustrates how those lessons may be applied to the formulation and implementation of more effective governance initiatives; and presents an emerging theoretical and practical framework for policy makers, researchers, practitioners, and students.

    Governance, Natural Resources, and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding is part of a global initiative to identify and analyze lessons in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management. The project has generated six books of case studies and analyses, with contributions from practitioners, policy makers, and researchers. Other books in this series address high-value resources, land, water, livelihoods, and assessing and restoring natural resources.


  • Contentious politics in Brazil and China : beyond regime / December Green, Wright State University, Laura Luehrmann, Wright State University
    JL 2431 G74 2016
    Contentious Politics in Brazil and China: Beyond Regime is a highly accessible and compelling examination of two fast-emerging countries in the global arena. It is not common to see Brazil and China examined side-by-side, but authors December Green and Laura Luehrmann show the utility of this unorthodox comparison: By moving beyond region and regime, this book offers a thought-provoking analysis of two very different countries dealing with many concerns and problems in surprisingly similar ways.With a focus on current issues, Contentious Politics in Brazil and China covers migration, urbanization, criminality, the environment, sexual politics and HIV-AIDS response, foreign policy, and international relations. This text not only illuminates each country's realities more clearly than traditional regional or regime-type comparisons can, but it offers unexpected insights into the study of state-society relations.

  • Citizenship, belonging and nation-states in the twenty-first century / edited by Nicole Stokes-DuPass and Ramona Fruja
    JF 801 C57245 2016
    Citizenship, Belonging, and Nation-States in the Twenty-First Century contributes to the scholarship on citizenship and integration by examining belonging in an array of national settings and by demonstrating how nation-states continue to matter in citizenship analysis. Citizenship policies are positioned as state mechanisms that actively shape the integration outcomes and experiences of belonging for all who reside within the nation-state. This edited volume contributes an alternative to the promotion of post-national models of membership and emphasizes that the most fundamental facet of citizenship--a status of recognition in relationship to a nation-state--need not be left in the 'relic galleries' of an allegedly outdated political past. This collection offers a timely contribution, both theoretical and empirical, to understanding citizenship, nationalism, and belonging in contexts that feature not only rapid change but also levels of entrenchment in ideological and historical legacies.

  • Anatomy of authoritarianism in the Arab republics / Joseph Sassoon
    JQ 1850 A58 S28 2016
    By examining the system of authoritarianism in eight Arab republics, Joseph Sassoon portrays life under these regimes and explores the mechanisms underpinning their resilience. How did the leadership in these countries create such enduring systems? What was the economic system that prolonged the regimes' longevity, but simultaneously led to their collapse? Why did these seemingly stable regimes begin to falter? This book seeks to answer these questions by utilizing the Iraqi archives and memoirs of those who were embedded in these republics: political leaders, ministers, generals, security agency chiefs, party members, and business people. Taking a thematic approach, the book begins in 1952 with the Egyptian Revolution and ends with the Arab uprisings of 2011. It seeks to deepen our understanding of the authoritarianism and coercive systems that prevailed in these countries and the difficult process of transition from authoritarianism that began after 2011.

  • Accommodating rising powers past, present, and future / edited by T.V. Paul, McGill University
    JC 364 A33 2016
    As the world enters the third decade of the twenty-first century, far-reaching changes are likely to occur. China, Russia, India, and Brazil, and perhaps others, are likely to emerge as contenders for global leadership roles. War as a system-changing mechanism is unimaginable, given that it would escalate into nuclear conflict and the destruction of the planet. It is therefore essential that policymakers in established as well as rising states devise strategies to allow transitions without resorting to war, but dominant theories of International Relations contend that major changes in the system are generally possible only through violent conflict. This volume asks whether peaceful accommodation of rising powers is possible in the changed international context, especially against the backdrop of intensified globalization. With the aid of historic cases, it argues that peaceful change is possible through effective long-term strategies on the part of both status quo and rising powers.

  • What's wrong with the United Nations and how to fix it / Thomas G. Weiss
    JZ 4984.5 W456 2016

    Seven decades after its establishment, the United Nations and its system of related organizations and programs are perpetually in crisis. While the twentieth-century's world wars gave rise to ground-breaking efforts at international organization in 1919 and 1945, today's UN is ill-equipped to deal with contemporary challenges to world order. Neither the end of the Cold War nor the aftermath of 9/11 has led to the "next generation" of multilateral institutions. But what exactly is wrong with the UN that makes it incapable of confronting contemporary global challenges and, more importantly, can we fix it?

    In this revised and updated third edition of his popular text, leading scholar of global governance Thomas G. Weiss takes a diagnose-and-cure approach to the world organization's inherent difficulties. In the first half of the book, he considers: the problems of international leadership and decision making in a world of self-interested states; the diplomatic complications caused by the artificial divisions between the industrialized North and the global South; the structural problems of managing the UN's many overlapping jurisdictions, agencies, and bodies; and the challenges of bureaucracy and leadership. The second half shows how to mitigate these maladies and points the way to a world in which the UN's institutional ills might be "cured." Weiss's remedies are not based on pious hopes of a miracle cure for the UN, but rather on specific and encouraging examples that could be replicated. With considered optimism and in contrast to received wisdom, he contends that substantial change is both plausible and possible.


  • Tunisia's international relations since the 'Arab Spring' : transition inside and out / edited by Tasnim Abderrahim, Laura-Theresa Krüger, Salma Besbes and Katharina McLarren
    JZ 1933 T86 2018

    When popular protests started in Tunisia in late 2010, few anticipated the implications these events would have for the entire Arab region. In the following years, this region witnessed deep changes, increased divisions, and even failing states. Meanwhile, Tunisia managed to assert itself as a new democracy. How did this small country manage its democratic transition within such a short period? And what implications has this had for its foreign policy and its role in international politics?

    This book assesses Tunisia#65533;s transition #65533;inside and out#65533; from four angles: Tunisian polity and politics which provide the framework for its foreign policy since the #65533;Arab Spring#65533;; bilateral relations before and after the #65533;Arab Spring#65533;; Tunisia#65533;s activism in international organisations as well as their presence in Tunisia; and transnational issues in Tunisia. Drawing on a broad range of primary sources, including authors#65533; own interview material conducted with politicians and representatives of civil society and international NGOs involved in the transition process, the book shows that since 2011 Tunisia has not only developed fundamentally at the domestic level, but also at the level of external relations. New and old alliances, a broadening of relations, and new activism of civil society and of Tunisia in international organisations certify that Tunisia has the potential to play an increasingly important role regionally as well as internationally.

    Providing an encompassing picture of Tunisia#65533;s changed role and successful transition from an autocracy to a democracy, the book allows students and scholars in the field to understand the #65533;last country standing#65533; better, a country that both the scientific community and the political scene should not underestimate for the promises it holds.


  • Human rights in China : a social practice in the shadows of authoritarianism / Eva Pils
    JC 599 C6 P55 2018
    How can we make sense of human rights in China's authoritarian Party-State system? Eva Pils offers a nuanced account of this contentious area, examining human rights as a set of social practices. Drawing on a wide range of resources including years of interaction with Chinese human rights defenders, Pils discusses what gives rise to systematic human rights violations, what institutional avenues of protection are available, and how social practices of human rights defence have evolved.

    Three central areas are addressed: liberty and integrity of the person; freedom of thought and expression; and inequality and socio-economic rights. Pils argues that the Party-State system is inherently opposed to human rights principles in all these areas, and that - contributing to a global trend - it is becoming more repressive. Yet, despite authoritarianism's lengthening shadows, China's human rights movement has so far proved resourceful and resilient. The trajectories discussed here will continue to shape the struggle for human rights in China and beyond its borders.

  • The future of intelligence / Mark M. Lowenthal
    JK 468 I6 L644 2018

    Intelligence is, by definition, a shadowy business. Yet many aspects of this secret world are now more openly analyzed and discussed, a trend which has inevitably prompted lively debate about intelligence gathering and analysis: what should be allowed? What boundaries, if any, should be drawn? And what changes and challenges lie ahead for intelligence activities and agencies?

    In this compelling book, leading intelligence scholar Mark Lowenthal explores the future of intelligence. There are, he argues, three broad areas - information technology and intelligence collection; analysis; and governance - that indicate the potential for rather dramatic change in the world of intelligence. But whether these important vectors for change will improve how intelligence works or make it more difficult remains to be seen. The only certainty is that intelligence will remain an essential feature of statecraft in our increasingly dangerous world.

    Drawing on the author's forty years' experience in U.S. intelligence, The Future of Intelligence offers a broad and authoritative starting point for the ongoing debate about what intelligence could be and how it may function in the years ahead.


  • Debating migration to Europe : welfare vs indentity / edited by Raffaele Marchetti
    JV 7590 D43 2018

    This concise, pointed contribution to the ongoing debate in Europe on the controversial phenomena of migration will appeal to the general reader, represent a significant contribution to the scholarly debate, and be an essential teaching and discussion tool.

    A brief introduction from the editor, setting the contours of the political debate on migration today in Europe, prepares the reader for the book#65533;s debate. This is followed by two very powerful and contrasting statements for and against migration to Europe, and a response from each contributor to the other.

    The pro-immigration chapter is written by Philippe Fargues, one of our most eminent migration scholars, whilst the anti-immigration chapter written by Anatol Lieven, a renowned expert on nationalism. The authors engage directly with the other's position, deepening the debate and searching for common ground, and suggesting solutions.

    This text will be of key interest to readers, scholars, and students of international migration, migration and development, European politics, political theory, and more broadly to public policy and international relations.


  • China and India : Asia's emergent great powers / Chris Ogden
    JZ 1734 O44 2017

    China and India are becoming increasingly influential, powerful and prominent countries - but what kind of states do their leaders and people wish them to become? Will they act and behave like major Western entities or like something altogether different, hence changing the very nature of international affairs? And as the Asian twenty- first century takes shape, how will these dynamics affect the wider geopolitical landscape and the balance of power?

    In this in-depth study, Chris Ogden evaluates the prospective impact of China and India upon the definition and nature of great power in the contemporary world. Whilst many contend that they will rise in a similar way to current and previous great powers - namely via traditional material, economic and military measures - Ogden explores the extent to which domestic political and cultural values as well as historical identities and perceptions are also central driving forces behind their common status, ambitions and worldviews. In so doing, he offers a new and comprehensive analysis of these two countries' past, contemporary and future global significance, in particular their shared status as the world's first such post-imperial great powers.


  • Black rights/white wrongs : the critique of racial liberalism / Charles W. Mills
    JC 574 M538 2017
    Liberalism is the political philosophy of equal persons - yet liberalism has denied equality to those it saw as sub-persons. Liberalism is the creed of fairness - yet liberalism has been complicit with European imperialism and African slavery. Liberalism is the classic ideology ofEnlightenment and political transparency - yet liberalism has cast a dark veil over its actual racist past and present. In sum, liberalism's promise of equal rights has historically been denied to blacks and other people of color. In Black Rights/White Wrongs: The Critique of Racial Liberalism, political philosopher Charles Mills challenges mainstream accounts that ignore this history and its current legacy in self-conceivedly liberal polities today. Mills argues that rather than bracket as an anomaly the role of racism inthe development of liberal theory, we should see it as shaping that theory in fundamental ways. As feminists have urged us to see the dominant form of liberalism as a patriarchal liberalism, so too Mills suggests we should see it as a racialized liberalism. It is unsurprising, then, if contemporaryliberalism has yet to deliver on the recognition of black rights and the correction of white wrongs. These essays look at racial liberalism, past and present: "white ignorance" as a guilty ignoring of social reality that facilitates white racial domination; Immanuel Kant's role as the most important liberal theorist of both personhood and sub-personhood; the centrality of racial exploitation in theUnited States; and the evasion of white supremacy in John Rawls's "ideal theory" framing of social justice and in the work of most other contemporary white political philosophers. Nonetheless, Mills still believes that a deracialized liberalism is both possible and desirable. He concludes by callingon progressives to "Occupy liberalism!" and develop accordingly a radical liberalism aimed at achieving racial justice.

  • Wartime sexual violence : from silence to condemnation of a weapon of war / Kerry F. Crawford
    JZ 6405 W66 C73 2017

    Reports of sexual violence in armed conflict frequently appear in political discussions and news media, presenting a stark contrast to a long history of silence and nonrecognition. Conflict-related sexual violence has transitioned rapidly from a neglected human rights issue to an unambiguous security concern on the agendas of powerful states and the United Nations Security Council. Through interviews and primary-source evidence, Kerry F. Crawford investigates the reasons for this dramatic change and the implications of the securitization of sexual violence.

    Views about wartime sexual violence began changing in the 1990s as a result of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and then accelerated in the 2000s. Three case studies--the United States' response to sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1820 in 2008, and the development of the United Kingdom's Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative--illustrate that use of the weapon of war frame does not represent pure co-optation by the security sector. Rather, well-placed advocates have used this frame to advance the antisexual violence agenda while simultaneously working to move beyond the frame's constraints. This book is a groundbreaking account of the transformation of international efforts to end wartime sexual violence.


  • The Presidency and social media : discourse, disruption, and digital democracy in the 2016 presidential election / edited by Dan Schill and John Allen Hendricks
    JK 526 2016 P737 2018

    The media have long played an important role in the modern political process and the 2016 presidential campaign was no different. From Trump#65533;s tweets and cable-show-call-ins to Sander#65533;s social media machine to Clinton#65533;s "Trump Yourself" app and podcast, journalism, social and digital media, and entertainment media were front-and-center in 2016. Clearly, political media played a dominant and disruptive role in our democratic process. This book helps to explain the role of these media and communication outlets in the 2016 presidential election.

    This thorough study of how political communication evolved in 2016 examines the disruptive role communication technology played in the 2016 presidential primary campaign and general election and how voters sought and received political information. The Presidency and Social Media includes top scholars from leading research institutions using various research methodologies to generate new understandings#65533;both theoretical and practical#65533;for students, researchers, journalists, and practitioners.


  • Navigating change for international NGOs : a practical handbook / James Crowley, Morgana Ryan
    JZ 4841 C76 2017
    How can the managers, the staff, the board members and CEOs of international NGOs best navigate the strategic changes that are needed so that their organizations can work effectively in today¿s complex environment? Having focused on the need for those changes in their previous book, Building a Better International NGO, James Crowley and Morgana Ryan now provide a practical, hands-on guide to achieving them. The authors cut through both jargon and platitudes to provide proven tools for leading strategic change¿tools that will help INGOs to improve their performance and increase their relevance as they grapple with new realities. James Crowley and Morgana Ryan have extensive experience working with some of the world¿s largest NGOs in the areas of international development and humanitarian aid.

  • Google and democracy : politics and the power of the Internet / Sean Richey and J. Benjamin Taylor
    JK 1764 R535 2018

    For the first time in human history, access to information on almost any topic is accessible through the Internet. A powerful extraction system is needed to disseminate this knowledge, which for most users is Google. Google Search is an extremely powerful and important component to American political life in the twenty-first century, yet its influence is poorly researched or understood.

    Sean Richey and J. Benjamin Taylor explore for the first time the influence of Google on American politics, specifically on direct democracy. Using original experiments and nationally representative cross-sectional data, Richey and Taylor show how Google Search returns quality information, that users click on quality information, and gain political knowledge and other contingent benefits. Additionally, they correlate Google usage with real-world voting behavior on direct democracy.

    Building a theory of Google Search use for ballot measures, Google and Democracy is an original addition to the literature on the direct democracy, Internet politics, and information technology. An indispensable read to all those wishing to gain new insights on how the Internet has the power to be a normatively valuable resource for citizens.


  • Crossing boundaries for intergovernmental management / Robert Agranoff
    JK 421 A558 2017

    Today, the work of government often involves coordination at the federal, state, and local levels as well as with contractors and citizens' groups. This process of governance across levels of government, jurisdictions, and types of actors is called intergovernmental relations, and intergovernmental management (IGM) is the way work is administered in this increasingly complex system. Leading authority Robert Agranoff reintroduces intergovernmental management for twenty-first-century governance to a new generation of scholars, students, and practitioners.

    Agranoff examines IGM in the United States from four thematic perspectives: law and politics, jurisdictional interdependency, multisector partners, and networks and networking. Common wisdom holds that government has "hollowed out" despite this present era of contracting and networked governance, but he argues that effective intergovernmental management has never been more necessary or important. He concludes by offering six next steps for intergovernmental management.


  • Cosmopolitanisms / edited by Bruce Robbins and Paulo Lemos Horta ; with an afterword by Kwame Anthony Appiah
    JZ 1308 C6887 2017
    An indispensable collection that re-examines what it means to belong in the world.

    "Where are you from?" The word cosmopolitan was first used as a way of evading exactly this question, when Diogenes the Cynic declared himself a "kosmo-polites," or citizen of the world. Cosmopolitanism displays two impulses--on the one hand, a detachment from one's place of origin, while on the other, an assertion of membership in some larger, more compelling collective.
    Cosmopolitanisms works from the premise that there is more than one kind of cosmopolitanism, a plurality that insists cosmopolitanism can no longer stand as a single ideal against which all smaller loyalties and forms of belonging are judged. Rather, cosmopolitanism can be defined as one of many possible modes of life, thought, and sensibility that are produced when commitments and loyalties are multiple and overlapping. Featuring essays by major thinkers, including Homi Bhabha, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas Bender, Leela Gandhi, Ato Quayson, and David Hollinger, among others, this collection asks what these plural cosmopolitanisms have in common, and how the cosmopolitanisms of the underprivileged might serve the ethical values and political causes that matter to their members. In addition to exploring the philosophy of Kant and the space of the city, this volume focuses on global justice, which asks what cosmopolitanism is good for, and on the global south, which has often been assumed to be an object of cosmopolitan scrutiny, not itself a source or origin of cosmopolitanism.
    This book gives a new meaning to belonging and its ground-breaking arguments call for deep and necessary discussion and discourse.

  • Civil society engagement : achieving better in Canada / edited by Patricia M. Daenzer
    JL 186.5 C59 2018

    Civil Society Engagement: Achieving Better in Canada examines the process and outcomes of a particular series of civil society activism and establishes a conceptual framework through an examination of Canadian politics and societal change.

    Relying on qualitative and ethnographic research, document analysis and reviews of policies, the contributions focus on social possibilities, legal limits and societal roles to illuminate the national asset of human solidarity evident in civil society activism in Canada. Patricia Daenzer and her expert contributors challenge the romanticism of #65533;the perfected welfare democracy#65533; and contend that civil society activism leads to the authentication of democracy. The premise is that Canadian political and policy inconsistencies fail to protect some and civil society intervention is essential for the realignment and redefinition of articulated national principles and redistributive outcomes. Although Canada is shown ultimately to be guarded in its welfare commitment, this #65533;guarded#65533; progress in welfare democracy would not be possible without the activism of segments of civil society.

    Civil Society Engagement: Achieving Better in Canada demystifies civil society activism and urges greater awareness of current social dynamics and involvement in the lives of the most disadvantaged. Not only are new immigrants and refugees voicing for inclusion, but the very definition of persons with rights has evolved through civil society activism. This book will lead to deliberations about state legal frameworks which impact civil society reach, the purpose and scope of Canadian politics and the potential of civil society in perfecting our democracy.


  • Beyond civil society : activism, participation, and protest in Latin America / Sonia E. Alvarez, Jeffrey W. Rubin, Millie Thayer, Gianpaolo Baiocchi, and Agustín Laó-Montes, editors ; [foreword by Arturo Escobar]
    JL 966 B496 2017
    The contributors to Beyond Civil Society argue that the conventional distinction between civic and uncivic protest, and between activism in institutions and in the streets, does not accurately describe the complex interactions of forms and locations of activism characteristic of twenty-first-century Latin America. They show that most contemporary political activism in the region relies upon both confrontational collective action and civic participation at different moments. Operating within fluid, dynamic, and heterogeneous fields of contestation, activists have not been contained by governments or conventional political categories, but rather have overflowed their boundaries, opening new democratic spaces or extending existing ones in the process. These essays offer fresh insight into how the politics of activism, participation, and protest are manifest in Latin America today while providing a new conceptual language and an interpretive framework for examining issues that are critical for the future of the region and beyond.

    Contributors. Sonia E. Alvarez, Kiran Asher, Leonardo Avritzer, Gianpaolo Baiocchi, Andrea Cornwall, Graciela DiMarco, Arturo Escobar, Raphael Hoetmer, Benjamin Junge, Luis E. Lander, Agust#65533;n La#65533;-Montes, Margarita L#65533;pez Maya, Jos#65533; Antonio Lucero, Graciela Monteagudo, Amalia Pallares, Jeffrey W. Rubin, Ana Claudia Teixeira, Millie Thayer

  • When proliferation causes peace : the psychology of nuclear crises / Michael D. Cohen
    JZ 5675 C62 2017

    Does state acquisition of nuclear weapons lead to stability and peace or instability and crises? This is one of the great debates in international relations scholarship. Michael D. Cohen argues that nuclear weapons acquisition often does dangerously embolden the acquiring state to undertake coercion and aggression, but that this behavior moderates over time as leaders learn the dangers and limitations of nuclear coercion. This book examines the historical cases of the Soviet Union and Pakistan in depth and also looks at mini-cases involving the United States, China, and India. This book broadens our understanding of how leaders and states behave when they acquire nuclear weapons and is important reading for scholars and students of international relations, security studies, and political psychology.


  • Statecraft and liberal reform in advanced democracies / Nils Karlson
    JC 574 K357 2018

    This book explains how advanced democracies and welfare states can achieve welfare-enhancing, liberal institutional reform. It develops a general theory based on an extended comparative case study of Sweden and Australia over the last 25 years, and offers an in-depth contribution to the field of institutional change, explaining how to govern a country well and how to overcome different barriers to reform, such as special interests, negativity biases and media logic. It develops the concepts of the 'reform cycle', 'reform strategies' and 'polycentric experiential' learning in order to explain successful reforms, and the key role of policy entrepreneurs, who introduce and develop new ideas. The book further examines why these reforms came to an end. Karlson also applies the ideas of Popperian, Kuhnian and Machiavellian reform strategies, and explains why they are needed for reform to come about.

    The theory of modern statecraft presented here involves a combination of knowing w

    hat and knowing how. It has the potential to be generally applicable in any advanced democracy with the ambition to improve its economy and society. This book is of interest for anyone who is concerned about budget deficits, slow growth, over regulation, lack of structural reforms and the rise of populism. It will appeal to scholars of political science, public policy and political economy.

  • The Routledge handbook of elections, voting behavior and public opinion / edited by Justin Fisher, Edward Fieldhouse, Mark N. Franklin, Rachel Gibson, Marta Cantijoch and Christopher Wlezien
    JF 1001 R62 2018

    The study of elections, voting behavior and public opinion are arguably among the most prominent and intensively researched sub-fields within Political Science. It is an evolving sub-field, both in terms of theoretical focus and in particular, technical developments and has made a considerable impact on popular understanding of the core components of liberal democracies in terms of electoral systems and outcomes, changes in public opinion and the aggregation of interests.

    This handbook details the key developments and state of the art research across elections, voting behavior and the public opinion by providing both an advanced overview of each core area and engaging in debate about the relative merits of differing approaches in a comprehensive and accessible way. Bringing geographical scope and depth, with comparative chapters that draw on material from across the globe, it will be a key reference point both for advanced level students and researchers developing knowledge and producing new material in these sub-fields and beyond.

    The Routledge Handbook of Elections, Voting Behavior and Public Opinion is an authoritative and key reference text for students, academics and researchers engaged in the study of electoral research, public opinion and voting behavior.


  • Red fighting blue : how geography and electoral rules polarize American politics / David A. Hopkins
    JK 1341 H67 2017
    The national electoral map has split into warring regional bastions of Republican red and Democratic blue, producing a deep and enduring partisan divide in American politics. In Red Fighting Blue, David A. Hopkins places the current partisan and electoral era in historical context, explains how the increased salience of social issues since the 1980s has redefined the parties' geographic bases of support, and reveals the critical role that American political institutions play in intermediating between the behavior of citizens and the outcome of public policy-making. The widening geographic gap in voters' partisan preferences, as magnified further by winner-take-all electoral rules, has rendered most of the nation safe territory for either Democratic or Republican candidates in both presidential and congressional elections - with significant consequences for party competition, candidate strategy, and the operation of government.

  • Politics and leadership in North Korea : the guerilla dynasty / Adrian Buzo
    JQ 1729.5 A58 B89 2018

    Politics and Leadership in North Korea, now fully updated in this second edition, presents an accessible and comprehensive account of North Korea's political, economic and foreign policies since its creation in 1945. Moving away from media representations of North Korea as dangerously erratic and dysfunctional, Buzo provides a thorough analysis of Kim Il Sung#65533;s vision for the DPRK and demonstrates the consistency of the successive leaderships#65533; approach to politics, economics and international affairs.

    This second edition has been fully revised and takes into account all the important events of the last fifteen years in North Korea, such as:

    #65533; endemic food shortages

    #65533; the steady growth of military emphasis in both politics and ideology

    #65533; the acquisition and continued development of nuclear capabilities

    #65533; the implementation and eventual failure of South Korea#65533;s #65533;sunshine policy#65533;

    #65533; the growth of private enterprise and a consumer economy.

    As such, it will continue to be an essential resource for students of North Korea, East Asian Politics and International Politics.


  • Organizing for policy influence : comparing parties, interest groups, and direct action / Benjamin Farrer
    JF 1525 P6 F37 2018

    In this book, Benjamin Farrer explains how activists can influence the policies they care about, even when they are outnumbered and their issues are ignored. The solution lies in a surprising place: organizational choice. Different types of organizations will be more influential under particular democratic institutions. If they choose the optimal type of organization - given their institutional context - then even minority groups can be influential. Environmentalists are a key example of how small groups can sometimes punch above their weight. Environmentalists in different countries have made different organizational choices. These choices explain whether or not they succeeded in influencing policy. In the empirical chapters that follow, Farrer shows that environmentalists can sometimes be more influential if they form interest groups, but under other institutions, political parties are the optimal organizational choice. Although interest groups are often easier to create, national institutions can sometimes insulate mainstream politicians from niche interest groups. When institutions deny access to interest groups, activists are forced to send the stronger signal of party entry.#65533;

    Using a variety of methods, including a formal model, an experiment, and a wealth of empirical data from a variety of settings, Farrer proves that this theory of organizational choice adds to our understanding of several crucial phenomena. First, it helps explain patterns of political participation, by showing the importance of instrumental, rather than purely expressive, motivations for activism. Second, it provides an important modification to Duverger#65533;s (1954) law, by showing that new party entry is a function not only of electoral rules but also of the rules that govern interest groups. Third, it extends research on the role of institutions in determining policy outputs, by showing that policy outcomes are a function of the interaction between organizational choices and institutional context.


  • Liberal moments : reading liberal texts / edited by Ewa Atanassow and Alan S. Kahan
    JC 574 L515 2017
    Liberalism today has perhaps more supporters and adversaries than any other political movement. This volume traces liberalism's global ascent through essays about some of the thinkers and actors who participated in its rise and spread. The essays included here present for the first time in one place the geographic and ideological diversity of liberal thought and practice as it developed since the eighteenth century. By exploring thinkers as diverse as Montesquieu, Abraham Lincoln, Jacob Burckhardt, Khayr al-Din, Hu Shih, John Rawls, and Czeslaw Milosz, this volume contributes toward a better understanding of liberalisms past and present.Each chapter opens with a critical passage from the author under consideration and explores the author's significance for liberalism. By facilitating a direct encounter with influential authors and texts, the volume serves as an introduction both to the multiple dimensions of liberalism and to reading texts in political thought. By engaging with particular liberal moments, the essays allow readers to create and explore conversations among liberalisms across time and space. It thus encourages a broader and more nuanced understanding of the nature and history of liberalism. Stimulating, accessible and interdisciplinary, Liberal Moments will appeal to students and scholars in the history of political thought, intellectual history and beyond.

  • Legitimacy in peacebuilding : rethinking civil society involvement in peace negotiations / Franzisca Zanker
    JZ 5538 Z3396 2018

    The book offers a critical analysis of legitimacy in peacebuilding, with a focus on peace negotiations and civil society participation in particular.

    The aim of this book is to unpack the meaning of legitimacy for the population in peacebuilding processes and the relationship this has with civil society involvement. There is a growing consensus for addressing local concerns in peacebuilding, with the aim of ensuring local ownership. Moreover, scholars have noted a relationship between civil society inclusion in peace negotiations and legitimacy. Yet, the very idea of legitimacy remains a black box. Using data from original empirical fieldwork #65533; including over 100 semi-structured interviews and 12 focus group discussions #65533; the book focuses on two case studies of negotiations that, respectively, ended a long civil war in Liberia in 2003 and ended the post-election violence in Kenya in 2008. It argues that civil society involvement is conceptually insufficient to show a multidimensional understanding of legitimacy. Instead, the book shows a complex picture of legitimate peace negotiations, based on outcome and participation-based characteristics with the involvement of both #65533;guarantors#65533; of legitimacy and a more general civic agency which includes the general population. Through forms of participative communication, the passive audience become active stakeholders in the construction of legitimacy. This has repercussions for how we think about civil society and peacebuilding more generally.

    This book will be of much interest to students of peacebuilding, conflict resolution, security studies and IR in general.


  • Injustice, memory and faith in human rights / edited by Kalliopi Chainoglou, Barry Collins, Michael Phillips and John Strawson
    JC 578 I55 2018

    This multi-disciplinary collection interrogates the role of human rights in addressing past injustices. The volume draws on legal scholars, political scientists, anthropologists and political philosophers grappling with the weight of the memory of historical injustices arising from conflicts in Europe, the Middle East and Australasia. It examines the role of human rights as legal doctrine, rhetoric and policy as developed by states, international organizations, regional groups and non-governmental bodies. The authors question whether faith in human rights is justified as balm to heal past injustice or whether such faith nourishes both victimhood and self-justification. These issues are explored through three discrete sections: moments of memory and injustice, addressing injustice; and questions of faith. In each of these sections, authors address the manner in which memory of past conflicts and injustice haunt our contemporary understanding of human rights. The volume questions whether the expectation that human rights law can deal with past injustice has undermined the development of an emancipatory politics of human rights for our current world.


  • Democratic Latin America / Craig L. Arceneaux
    JL 966 A74 2018

    This much-expanded and updated second edition of Democratic Latin America takes an institutional approach to Latin American politics to discuss contemporary politics and to highlight how past politics have shaped current institutional designs. It draws explicit connections between certain political features- such as fragmentation, efficiency, accountability, instability, consensus, or responsiveness- and the institutional design of a country. Students thus learn not only that a country is unstable or has high rates of participation or low levels of corruption, but they also learn why. And more importantly, they also learn how politics can be shaped by different institutional arrangements.

    Features:

    Each chapter focuses on a different institution, such as the executive, political parties, electoral systems, the armed forces, or federalism and compares how they are constructed differently across countries. Placing a premium on accessibility, each chapter opens with a story and ends with a detailed country case study, making use of contemporary examples to feed student interest in current events. Newly updated comparison-based tables and box features (electoral results, percentage of women legislators, and surveys of partisan identification) are included to stimulate analysis.

    New topics of research have been added to ensure the recognition of the latest changes in the region, including: corruption scandals; the turn of the "pink tide"; protest and social movements; LGBT rights; citizen security and organized crime; new forms of legislative accountability; and the use of social media as a political resource in Latin America.

    Democratic Latin America continues to offer an original way of teaching and learning about Latin American politics.


  • Democracy and its crisis / A. C. Grayling
    JC 423 G73 2017
    "Mr. Grayling incisively surveys attempts by Western thinkers, from Plato and Aristotle to Madison and Tocqueville, to resolve what he calls the 'dilemma of democracy': the tension between the belief that power belongs ultimately to the people, and the desire for stable and humane government."
    -- The Wall Street Journal

    Prompted by the EU referendum in the UK and the presidential election in the USA, A. C. Grayling investigates why the institutions of representative democracy seem unable to hold up against forces they were designed to manage, and why, crucially, it matters.

    First he considers moments in history -- Periclean Athens, the English Civil War, the American and French Revolutions, among them -- in which the challenges we face today were first encountered and what solutions, however imperfect, were found. Then he lays bare the specific problems of democracy in the twenty-first century and maps out a set of urgently needed reforms.

    With the advent of authoritarian leaders and the simultaneous rise of populism, representative democracy appears to be caught between a rock and a hard place, yet it is this space that it must occupy, says Grayling, if a civilized society, that looks after all its people, is to flourish.

  • The CIA and the politics of US intelligence reform / Brent Durbin
    JK 468 I6 D88 2017
    Examining the political foundations of American intelligence policy, this book develops a new theory of intelligence adaptation to explain the success or failure of major reform efforts since World War II. Durbin draws on careful case histories of the early Cold War, the Nixon and Ford administrations, the first decade after the Cold War, and the post-9/11 period, looking closely at the interactions among Congress, executive branch leaders, and intelligence officials. These cases demonstrate the significance of two factors in the success or failure of reform efforts: the level of foreign policy consensus in the system, and the ability of reformers to overcome the information advantages held by intelligence agencies. As these factors ebb and flow, windows of opportunity for reform open and close, and different actors and interests come to influence reform outcomes. Durbin concludes that the politics of US intelligence frequently inhibit effective adaptation, undermining America's security and the civil liberties of its citizens.

  • Beyond gridlock / [edited by] Thomas Hale and David Held ; with Garrett Wallace Brown [and 10 others]
    JZ 1318 B483 2017

    It is now conventional wisdom to see the great policy challenges of the 21st century as inherently transnational. It is equally common to note the failures of the international institutions the world relies on to address such challenges. As the acclaimed 2013 book Gridlock argued, the world increasingly needs effective international cooperation, but multilateralism appears unable to deliver it in the face of deepening interdependence, rising multipolarity, and the growing complexity and fragmentation that characterise the global order.

    The Gridlock authors have now partnered with a group of leading experts to offer a trenchant reassessment of elements of the argument. Comparing anomalies and exceptions to multilateral dysfunction across a number of spheres of world politics, Beyond Gridlock explores seven pathways through and beyond gridlock. While multilateralism continues to fall short, Beyond Gridlock identifies systematic means to avoid or resist these forces and turn them into collective solutions. This book offers a vital new perspective on world politics as well as a practical guide for positive change in global policy.


  • The idea of failed states : community, society, nation, and patterns of cohesion / H. Christian Breede
    JC 328.7 B75 2017

    Why are some states able to deliver public services to their citizens while others cannot? Why are some states beset by internal conflict that leaves many impoverished? Much of what has become known as the failed states literature attempts to engage with these questions, but does so in way that betrays a particular bias, engaging in advocacy for intervention rather than analysis. The Idea of Failed States directly challenges existing thinking about conventional state strength as it finds that institutional approaches to state strength obscure as much as they reveal.

    The question of why some states are strong and others weak has traditionally been addressed using measures of economic growth, resources, and quality of life. This book compares the dimensions of state strength characterised by community, society, and nation and uses social capital concepts to further illuminate them. Applying this approach across forty-two countries shows #65533;weak#65533; states exhibiting a consistent and unique patterns of relationships between community, society, and nation as well as equally consistent and unique relationships in strong states. A blend of theory and empirics, The Idea of Failed States present a new way to think about the state #65533; one that applies to both strong and weak alike.

    This work should be of interest to students and scholars researching social capital, public policy, international development and security studies.


  • Honest politics now : what ethical conduct means in Canadian public life / edited by Ian Greene and David P. Shugarman
    JL 86 C67 H66 2017

    There have been enormous changes in Canadian public life in the past two decades. More and more, politicians and officials are expected to act honestly and in the public interest. Yet, for many, honest politics is still an oxymoron.

    Using high-profile political scandals as case studies, this book explores the standards of accountability to which Canadian politicians are now being held. The authors discuss conflict-of-interest and abuse-of-trust cases such as Brian Mulroney's receipt at secret meetings of envelopes stuffed with thousand dollar bills; the gas plant scandal in Ontario; Allison Redford's self-serving authorizations of spending in Alberta; Mike Duffy and the Senate expenses scandal; party financing cases such as the Robocalls affair; "dirty hands" examples such as the sponsorship scandal and the Arrar affair; the "cash for access" controversy surrounding Justin Trudeau's fundraisers; and municipal issues including the sagas of Rob Ford and Hazel McCallion.

    Canada is a leader among countries promoting ethical politics in a democratic society. In this book expert authors from across the country discuss the strengths and weaknesses of measures now in place and point to the most important challenges that remain before Canadians can believe that honesty prevails in public life.


  • Gender, UN peacebuilding, and the politics of space : locating legitimacy / Laura J. Shepherd
    JZ 6374 S535 2017
    The United Nations Peacebuilding Commission (UNPBC) was established in December 2005 to develop outlines of best practice in post-conflict reconstruction, and to secure the political and material resources necessary to assist states in transition from conflict to peacetime. Currently, theorganization is involved in reconstruction and peacebuilding activities in six countries. Yet, a 2010 review by permanent representatives to the United Nations found that the hopes of the UN peacebuilding architecture "despite committed and dedicated efforts...ha[d] yet to be realized." Two of these"hopes" deal with gender issues, specifically that peacebuilding efforts integrate a "gender perspective" and that the Commission consult with civil society, NGOs, and women's organizations. This book is the first to offer an extensive and dedicated analysis of the activities of the UN Peacebuilding Commission with regard to both gender politics, broadly conceived, and the gendered dynamics of civil society participation in peacebuilding activities. Laura J. Shepherd draws upon originalfieldwork that she conducted with the UNPBC to argue that the spatial politics of peacebuilding are not only gendered - such that they further marginalize and disadvantage indigenous populations in peacebuilding activities - but also perpetuate hierarchies that privilege the international over thedomestic realms. Laying bare the logics of gender and space that organize UN peacebuilding discourse, the book asserts that the representations of women, gender, and civil society inform the meaning of UN peacebuilding in contemporary world politics.

  • Rivals for power : Ottawa and the provinces : the contentious history of the Canadian federation / Ed Whitcomb
    JL 27 W55 2017

    Rivals for Power: Ottawa and the Provinces tells the story of the politicians who continually contend over the division of power (and money) between Ottawa and the provinces. The heroes and villains of this story include many of the leading lights of Canadian history, from John A. Macdonald, Wilfred Laurier, and Maurice Duplessis to Pierre Trudeau, Joe Clark, Bill Davis, Peter Lougheed and Jean Chretien. The unique feature of this book is its focus: no matter what their policies, Canadian politicians over the years have engaged in an ongoing push and pull over power, with both successes and failures. As Whitcomb sees it, the success of the provinces at preventing Ottawa from becoming the overwhelming power in Canadian life has been the key to the country's stability and its cultural cohesion. But the failure of the provinces to achieve an equal measure of power and the growing gap between the have and have-not provinces stands as an ongoing challenge -- and threat -- to the country's unity.


  • The Elizabethan Secretariat and the Signet Office : the production of state papers, 1590-1596 / Angela Andreani
    JN 389 A64 2017

    This book investigates the work of the Elizabethan secretariat during the fascinating decade of the 1590s, when, after the death of Francis Walsingham, the place of principal secretary remained vacant for six years. Through original sources in the collections of the State Papers and Cecil Papers, this study reconstructs the activities of the clerks and secretaries who worked in close contact with the Queen at court. An estimated fifty people, many unidentified, saw to every minute detail of the production of official documents and letters in an array of offices, rooms and locations within and outside the court. The book introduces the staff of the Elizabethan writing offices as a community of shared knowledge with a privileged and constant access to papers of state, working behind the scenes of court display and high politics. While the production of the state papers is explored as a means to re-construct the functioning of the inner mechanisms of state, it also provides a lens through which to access the knowledge of the administration in a pre-bureaucratic age.

page last updated on: Monday 22 January 2018
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