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Philosophy, Aesthetics, Ethics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range B - BD (Philosophy) and BH - BJ (Aesthetics, Ethics) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • The Palgrave Kant handbook / Matthew C. Altman, editor
    B2798

  • Sociality and Normativity for Robots : Philosophical Inquiries into Human-Robot Interactions / edited by Raul Hakli, Johanna Seibt
    B53

  • Angela Carter and western philosophy / Heidi Yeandle
    B804
    This book unearths Carter's deconstruction of the male-dominated discipline of Western thought. Revealing the extensive philosophical research that underpins Carter's intertextual work, this book offers new readings of her fiction in relation to a range of philosophical texts and ideas. By re-examining Carter's writing with reference to the archived collection of her notes that has recently become available at the British Library, Angela Carter and Western Philosophy puts forward new interpretations of Carter's writing practices. With chapters examining her allusions to Plato, Hobbes and Rousseau, Descartes, Locke and Hume, Wittgenstein and Ryle, as well as Kant and Sade, this book illuminates Carter's engagement with different areas of Western thought, and discusses how this shapes her portrayal of reality, identity, civilisation, and morality. Angela Carter and Western Philosophy will be of interest to researchers, lecturers, and students working on contemporary women's writing, philosophy and literature, and intertextual literary practices. 

  • Epistemic virtues in the sciences and the humanities. Towards an Integrated history of the sciences and the humanities / jeroen van Dongen; Herman Paul
    B820.3

  • The radicalization of Cicero : John Toland and strategic editing in the early enlightenment / Katherine A. East
    B1393.Z7
    This book uses a previously overlooked Neo-Latin treatise,  Cicero Illustratus,  to provide insight into the status and function of the Ciceronian tradition at the beginning of the eighteenth century, and consequently to more broadly illuminate the fate of that tradition in the early Enlightenment. Cicero Illustratus itself is the first subject for inquiry, mined for what its deliberately erudite and colorfully polemical passages of scholarly stratagems reveal about Ciceronian scholarship and the motives for exploring it within the context of early Enlightenment thought. It also includes an analysis of the role played by the Ciceronian tradition in the broader political and radical movements that existed in the Enlightenment, with particular attention paid to Cicero's unexpectedly prominent position in major political and philosophical Republican and Erastian works. The subject of this book together with the conclusions reached will provide scholars and students with crucial new material relating to the classical tradition, the history of scholarship, and the intellectual history of the early Enlightenment.

  • Normality : a critical genealogy / Peter Cryle and Elizabeth Stephens
    B 105 N65 C79 2017
    The concept of normal is so familiar that it can be hard to imagine contemporary life without it. Yet the term entered everyday speech only in the mid-twentieth century. Before that, it was solely a scientific term used primarily in medicine to refer to a general state of health and the orderly function of organs. But beginning in the middle of the twentieth century, normal broke out of scientific usage, becoming less precise and coming to mean a balanced condition to be maintained and an ideal to be achieved.

    In Normality , Peter Cryle and Elizabeth Stephens offer an intellectual and cultural history of what it means to be normal. They explore the history of how communities settle on any one definition of the norm, along the way analyzing a fascinating series of case studies in fields as remote as anatomy, statistics, criminal anthropology, sociology, and eugenics. Cryle and Stephens argue that since the idea of normality is so central to contemporary disability, gender, race, and sexuality studies, scholars in these fields must first have a better understanding of the context for normality. This pioneering book moves beyond binaries to explore for the first time what it does--and doesn't--mean to be normal.

  • Plotinus and the moving image / by Thorsten Botz-Bornstein, Giannis Stamatellos
    B 693 Z7 B677 2017
    Plotinus and the Moving Image offers the first philosophical discussion on Plotinus' philosophy and film. It discusses Plotinian concepts like "the One" in a cinematic context and relates Plotinus' theory of time as a transitory intelligible movement of the soul to Bergson's and Deleuze's time-image. Film is a unique medium for a rapprochement of our modern consciousness with the thought of Plotinus. The Neoplatonic vestige is particularly worth exploring in the context of the newly emerging "Cinema of Contemplation." Plotinus' search for the "intelligible" that can be grasped neither by sense perception nor by merely logical abstractions leads to a fluent way of seeing. Parallels that had so far never been discussed are made plausible. This book is a milestone in the philosophy of film. Contributors are: Cameron Barrows, Thorsten Botz-Bornstein, Michelle Phillips Buchberger, Steve Choe, Stephen Clark, Vincenzo Lomuscio, Tony Partridge, Daniel Regnier, Giannis Stamatellos, Enrico Terrone, Sebastian F. Moro Tornese and Panayiota Vassilopoulou.

  • Plato's Timaeus : translation, glossary, appendices and introductory essay / Peter Kalkavage
    B 387 A5 K25 2001

    This is an English translation of Plato's dialogue concerning speculation on the nature of the physical world and human beings. An extensive introduction provides careful insights to the reading of the work, the nature of Platonic dialogue and the cultural background of the Timaeus. Appendices on music, astronomy and geometry further provide guidance to the central thoughts of the dialogue. The glossary provides cross references and discussion for key words in the dialogue, functioning as springboards into the various concepts and ideas that are central to this and other Platonic dialogues and are useful starting points for any classroom discussion or personal thought.

    Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato's immediate audience.


  • Kinaesthetic knowing : aesthetics, epistemology, modern design / Zeynep Çelik Alexander
    BH 221 G3 A44 2017
    Is all knowledge the product of thought? Or can the physical interactions of the body with the world produce reliable knowledge? In late-nineteenth-century Europe, scientists, artists, and other intellectuals theorized the latter as a new way of knowing, which Zeynep #65533;elik Alexander here dubs "kinaesthetic knowing."
    In this book, Alexander offers the first major intellectual history of kinaesthetic knowing and its influence on the formation of modern art and architecture and especially modern design education. Focusing in particular on Germany and tracing the story up to the start of World War II, Alexander reveals the tension between intellectual meditation and immediate experience to be at the heart of the modern discourse of aesthetics, playing a major part in the artistic and teaching practices of numerous key figures of the period, including Heinrich W#65533;lfflin, Hermann Obrist, August Endell, L#65533;szl#65533; Moholy-Nagy, and many others. Ultimately, she shows, kinaesthetic knowing did not become the foundation of the human sciences, as some of its advocates had hoped, but it did lay the groundwork--at such institutions as the Bauhaus--for modern art and architecture in the twentieth century.

  • Time in feminist phenomenology / edited by Christina Schües, Dorothea E. Olkowski, and Helen A. Fielding
    BD 638 T564 2011

    The contributors to this international volume take up questions about a phenomenology of time that begins with and attunes to gender issues. Themes such as feminist conceptions of time, change and becoming, the body and identity, memory and modes of experience, and the relevance of time as a moral and political question, shape Time in Feminist Phenomenology and allow readers to explore connections between feminist philosophy, phenomenology, and time. With its insistence on the importance of gender experience to the experience of time, this volume is a welcome opening to new and critical thinking about being, knowledge, aesthetics, and ethics.


  • The mathematical analysis of logic : being an essay towards a calculus of deductive reasoning / by George Boole
    BC 71 B63 2015b
    George Boole was an English mathematician and logician. He worked in the fields of differential equations and algebraic logic. Boolean logic (once described as "0 and 1" logic) is credited with laying the foundations for the information age. In 1841 Boole published an influential paper in early invariant theory. He received a medal from the Royal Society for his 1844 work, On A General Method of Analysis. It was a contribution to the theory of linear differential equations, moving from the case of constant coefficients on which he had already published, to variable coefficients. In 1847 Boole published The Mathematical Analysis of Logic, the first of his works on symbolic logic.

  • Society must be defended : lectures at the Collège de France, 1975-76 / Michel Foucault ; edited by Mauro Bertani and Alessandro Fontana ; general editors, François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by David Macey
    B 2430 F723 F3813 2003
    An examination of relations between war and politics

    From 1971 until his death in 1984, Michel Foucault taught at the Collège de France, perhaps the most prestigious intellectual institution in Europe. Each year, in a series of 12 public lectures, Foucault sought to explain his research of the previous year. These lectures do not reduplicate his published books, although they do have themes in common. The lectures show Foucault ranging freely and conversationally over the implications of his research.

    In Society Must Be Defended , Foucault deals with the emergence in the early 17th century of a new understanding of society and its relation to war. War was now seen as the permanent basis of all institutions of power, a hidden presence within society that could be deciphered by an historical analysis. Tracing this development, Foucault outlines a genealogy of power/knowledge that was to become a primary concern in his final years.

  • The Logical Legacy of Nikolai Vasiliev and Modern Logic
    BC15

  • The Palgrave handbook of African philosophy edited by Adeshina Afolaya and Toyin Falola
    B5305

  • Levinas, Kant and the problematic of temporality Adonis Frangeskou
    BD638

  • Reflections on human inquiry : science, philosophy, and common life / Nirmalangshu Mukherji
    B53

  • Kósmos Noetós : the metaphysical architecture of Charles S. Peirce / Ivo Assad Ibri
    BD113

  • Finding one's way through Wittgenstein's Philosophical investigations : new essays on 1-88 / Emmanuel Bermon, Jean-Philippe Narboux, editors
    B3376.W564

  • Pragmatism in transition : contemporary perspectives on C.I. Lewis / Peter Olen, Carl Sachs, editors
    B945.L454

  • Ontologies of nature : continental perspectives and environmental reorientations / Gerard Kuperus, Marjolein Oele, editors
    BD581

  • Women, Camp, and Popular Culture Serious Excess
    BH 301 C36 P67 2008eb

  • The fascination with unknown time Sibylle Baumbach, Lena Henningsen, Klaus Oschema, editors
    BD638

  • Leibniz on causation and agency / Julia Jorati
    B 2598 J57 2017
    This book presents a comprehensive examination of Gottfried Leibniz's views on the nature of agents and their actions. Julia Jorati offers a fresh look at controversial topics including Leibniz's doctrines of teleology, the causation of spontaneous changes within substances, divine concurrence, freedom, and contingency, and also discusses widely neglected issues such as his theories of moral responsibility, control, attributability, and compulsion. Rather than focusing exclusively on human agency, she explores the activities of non-rational substances and the differences between distinctive types of actions, showing how the will, appetitions, and teleology are key to Leibniz's discussions of agency. Her book reveals that Leibniz has a nuanced and compelling philosophy of action which has relevance for present-day discussions of agency. It will be of interest to scholars and students of early modern philosophy as well as to metaphysicians and philosophers of action.

  • The Cambridge history of philosophy in late antiquity. edited by Lloyd P. Gerson
    B 1111 C36 2010eb

  • The Cambridge history of philosophy in late antiquity. edited by Lloyd P. Gerson
    B 1111 C36 2010eb

  • The Cambridge history of medieval philosophy. edited by Robert Pasnau ; associate editor, Christina Van Dyke
    B 721 C363 2009eb

  • The Cambridge history of medieval philosophy. edited by Robert Pasnau ; associate editor, Christina Van Dyke
    B 721 C363 2009eb

  • A naïve realist theory of colour / Keith Allen
    B 105 C455 A45 2016
    A Naive Realist Theory of Colour defends the view that colours are mind-independent properties of things in the environment, that are distinct from properties identified by the physical sciences. This view stands in contrast to the long-standing and wide-spread view amongst philosophers andscientists that colours don't really exist - or at any rate, that if they do exist, then they are radically different from the way that they appear. It is argued that a naive realist theory of colour best explains how colours appear to perceiving subjects, and that this view is not undermined eitherby reflecting on variations in colour perception between perceivers and across perceptual conditions, or by our modern scientific understanding of the world. A Naive Realist Theory of Colour also illustrates how our understanding of what colours are has far-reaching implications for wider questions about the nature of perceptual experience, the relationship between mind and world, the problem of consciousness, the apparent tension between common senseand scientific representations of the world, and even the very nature and possibility of philosophical inquiry.

  • Human dignity : a way of living / Peter Bieri ; translated by Diana Siclovan
    BJ 1533 R42 B5413 2017

    Dignity is humanity s most prized possession. We experience the loss of dignity as a terrible humiliation: when we lose our dignity we feel deprived of something without which life no longer seems worth living. But what exactly is this trait that we value so highly?

    In this important new book, distinguished philosopher Peter Bieri looks afresh at the notion of human dignity. In contrast to most traditional views, he argues that dignity is not an innate quality of human beings or a right that we possess by virtue of being human. Rather, dignity is a certain way to lead one s life. It is a pattern of thought, experience and action in other words, a way of living.

    In Bieri s account, there are three key dimensions to dignity as a way of living. The first is the way I am treated by others: they can treat me in a way that leaves my dignity intact or they can destroy my dignity. The second dimension concerns the way that I treat other people: do I treat them in a way that allows me to live a dignified life? The third dimension concerns the view that I have of myself: which ways of seeing and treating myself allow me to maintain a sense of dignity? In the actual flow of day-to-day life these three dimensions of dignity are often interwoven, and this accounts in part for the complexity of the situations and experiences in which our dignity is at stake.

    So, why did we invent dignity and what role does it play in our lives? As thinking and acting beings, our lives are fragile and constantly under threat. A dignified way of living, argues Bieri, is humanity s way of coping with this threat. In our constantly endangered lives, it is important to stand our ground with confidence. Thus a dignified way of living is not any way of living: it is a particular way of responding to the existential experience of being under threat. It is also a particular way of answering the question: What kind of life do we wish to live?

    This beautifully written reflection on our most cherished human value will be of interest to a wide readership.


  • A comparative analysis of Cicero and Aquinas : nature and the natural law / Charles P. Nemeth
    B 553 N46 2017
    In A Comparative Analysis of Cicero and Aquinas , Charles P. Nemeth investigates how, despite their differences, these two figures may be the most compatible brothers in ideas ever conceived in the theory of natural law. Looking to find common threads that run between the philosophies of these two great thinkers of the Classical and Medieval periods, this book aims to determine whether or not there exists a common ground whereby ethical debates and dilemmas can be evaluated. Does comparison between Cicero and Aquinas offer a new pathway for moral measure, based on defined and developed principles? Do they deliver certain moral and ethical principles for human life to which each agree? Instead of a polemical diatribe, comparison between Cicero and Aquinas may edify a method of compromise and afford a more or less restrictive series of judgements about ethical quandaries.

  • Beyond the analytic-continental divide : pluralist philosophy in the twenty-first century / edited by Jeffrey A. Bell, Andrew Cutrofello, and Paul M. Livingston
    B 805 B38 2016

    This forward-thinking collection presents new work that looks beyond the division between the analytic and continental philosophical traditions#65533;one that has long caused dissension, mutual distrust, and institutional barriers to the development of common concerns and problems. Rather than rehearsing the causes of the divide, contributors draw upon the problems, methods, and results of both traditions to show what post-divide philosophical work looks like in practice.

    Ranging from metaphysics and philosophy of mind to political philosophy and ethics, the papers gathered here bring into mutual dialogue a wide range of recent and contemporary thinkers, and confront leading problems common to both traditions, including methodology, ontology, meaning, truth, values, and personhood. Collectively, these essays show that it is already possible to foresee a future for philosophical thought and practice no longer determined neither as "analytic" nor as "continental," but, instead, as a pluralistic synthesis of what is best in both traditions. The new work assembled here shows how the problems, projects, and ambitions of twentieth-century philosophy are already being taken up and productively transformed to produce new insights, questions, and methods for philosophy today.


  • Three dialogues between Hylas and Philonous / George Berkeley ; edited by Dale Jacquette
    B 1326 J33 2013

    This is a new critical edition of Berkeley's 1734 (third edition, first 1713) Three Dialogues, a text that is deservedly one of the most challenging and beloved classics of modern philosophy. The heart of the work is the dispute between materialism and idealism, two fundamentally opposed positions that are embodied by Hylas and Philonous, the characters in this philosophical drama. The book is packed with brilliant arguments and counter-arguments of an extraordinarily sophisticated nature. Amid all this philosophical swordplay one would think that there could be scant room for the characters to develop any sort of personality. Yet in Berkeley's hands, and with his literary gifts, the interlocutors are both vivid and funny.

    The dialogue deals with some of the most important perennial problems of philosophy, including: the materialism-idealism dispute, skepticism in rationalist and empiricist epistemology, the conflict over apriorism and aposteriorism, rationalism versus empiricism, the existence and nature of God, the philosophy of science, philosophy of mathematics, abstract general ideas, the role of perception in human knowledge, and the metaphysics of causation.

    This edition combines a usefully annotated version of Berkeley's complete original text with a substantial critical introduction, a chronology of events in Berkeley's life and career, and supplementary annotated appendices of original sources from thinkers relevant to Berkeley's work.


  • Sites of exposure : art, politics, and the nature of experience / John Russon
    BD 431 R877 2017

    John Russon draws from a broad range of art and literature to show how philosophy speaks to the most basic and important questions in our everyday lives. In Sites of Exposure, Russon grapples with how personal experiences such as growing up and confronting death combine with broader issues such as political oppression, economic exploitation, and the destruction of the natural environment to make life meaningful. His is cutting-edge philosophical work, illuminated by original and rigorous thinking that relies on cross-cultural communication and engagement with the richness of human cultural history. These probing interpretations of the nature of phenomenology, the philosophy of art, history, and politics, are appropriate for students and scholars of philosophy at all levels.


  • Philosophy within its proper bounds / Edouard Machery
    B 837 M34 2017
    In Philosophy Within Its Proper Bounds, Edouard Machery argues that resolving many traditional and contemporary philosophical issues is beyond our epistemic reach and that philosophy should re-orient itself toward more humble, but ultimately more important intellectual endeavors. Anyresolution to many of these contemporary issues would require an epistemic access to metaphysical possibilities and necessities, which, Machery argues, we do not have. In effect, then, Philosophy Within Its Proper Bounds defends a form of modal skepticism. The book assesses the main philosophicalmethod for acquiring the modal knowledge that the resolution of modally immodest philosophical issues turns on: the method of cases, that is, the consideration of actual or hypothetical situations (which cases or thought experiments describe) in order to determine what facts hold in thesesituations. Canvassing the extensive work done by experimental philosophers over the last 15 years, Edouard Machery shows that the method of cases is unreliable and should be rejected. Importantly, the dismissal of modally immodest philosophical issues is no cause for despair - many important philosophicalissues remain within our epistemic reach. In particular, reorienting the course of philosophy would free time and resources for bringing back to prominence a once-central intellectual endeavor: conceptual analysis.

  • The philosophy of existentialism / edited with a foreword by Wade Baskin
    B 2430 S32 E5 2015
    A collection of essays by Jean-Paul Sartre that touch upon the subject of existentialism by looking at aesthetics, emotions, writing, phenomenology, and perception
    The Philosophy of Existentialism collects representative essays on Jean-Paul Sartre's pioneering subject: existentialism. Beginning with a thoughtful introduction by fellow French philosopher Jean Wahl, this worklooks at existentialism through several lenses, exploring topics such as the emotions, imagination, nothingness, freedom, responsibility, and the desire to be God. By providing exposition on a variety of subjects, The Philosophy of Existentialism is a valuable introduction to Sartre's ideas.

  • Matter and memory / Henri Bergson ; authorized translation by Nancy Margaret Paul and W. Scott Palmer
    B 2430 B4 M313 1988
    A monumental work by a Nobel Prize-winner, this 1896 work represents one of the great inquiries into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Bergson surveys these independent but related spheres, exploring the connection of mind and body to individual freedom of choice.

  • The new politics of materialism : history, philosophy, science / edited by Sarah Ellenzweig and John H. Zammito
    B 825 N495 2017

    New materialism challenges the mechanistic models characteristic of early modern philosophy that regarded matter as largely passive and inert. Instead it gives weight to topics often overlooked in such accounts: agency, vitalism, complexity, contingency, and self-organization.

    This collection, which includes an international roster of contributors from philosophy, history, literature, and science, is the first to ask what is "new" about the new materialism and place it in interdisciplinary perspective. Against current theories of new materialism it argues for a deeper engagement with materialism's history, questions whether matter can be "lively," and asks whether new materialism's wish to revitalize politics and the political lives up to its promise.

    Contributors: Keith Ansell-Pearson, Sarah Ellenzweig, Christian J. Emden, N. Katherine Hayles, Jess Keiser, Mogens Laerke, Ian Lowrie, Lenny Moss, Angela Willey, Catherine Wilson, Charles T. Wolfe, Derek Woods, and John H. Zammito.


  • Exploring ethics : an introductory anthology / edited by Steven M. Cahn
    BJ 1012 E97 2017
    This text brings together a rich, balanced, and wide-ranging collection of over fifty readings on ethical theory and contemporary moral issues. The selections are organized into three parts, providing instructors with flexibility in designing and teaching a variety of ethics courses.

  • The hour of our death : the classic history of western attitudes toward death over the last one thousand years / Philippe Ariès ; translated from the French by Helen Weaver
    BD 444 A67313 2008
    This remarkable book--the fruit of almost two decades of study--traces in compelling fashion the changes in Western attitudes toward death and dying from the earliest Christian times to the present day. A truly landmark study, The Hour of Our Death reveals a pattern of gradually developing evolutionary stages in our perceptions of life in relation to death, each stage representing a virtual redefinition of human nature.

    Starting at the very foundations of Western culture, the eminent historian Phillipe Ari#65533;s shows how, from Graeco-Roman times through the first ten centuries of the Common Era, death was too common to be frightening; each life was quietly subordinated to the community, which paid its respects and then moved on. Ari#65533;s identifies the first major shift in attitude with the turn of the eleventh century when a sense of individuality began to rise and with it, profound consequences: death no longer meant merely the weakening of community, but rather the destruction of self. Hence the growing fear of the afterlife, new conceptions of the Last Judgment, and the first attempts (by Masses and other rituals) to guarantee a better life in the next world. In the 1500s attention shifted from the demise of the self to that of the loved one (as family supplants community), and by the nineteenth century death comes to be viewed as simply a staging post toward reunion in the hereafter. Finally, Ari#65533;s shows why death has become such an unendurable truth in our own century--how it has been nearly banished from our daily lives--and points out what may be done to "re-tame" this secret terror.

    The richness of Ari#65533;s's source material and investigative work is breathtaking. While exploring everything from churches, religious rituals, and graveyards (with their often macabre headstones and monuments), to wills and testaments, love letters, literature, paintings, diaries, town plans, crime and sanitation reports, and grave robbing complaints, Aries ranges across Europe to Russia on the one hand and to England and America on the other. As he sorts out the tangled mysteries of our accumulated terrors and beliefs, we come to understand the history--indeed the pathology--of our intellectual and psychological tensions in the face of death.

  • Postmetaphysical thinking. Jürgen Habermas ; translated by Ciaran Cronin
    B 3258 H323 N33313 2017

    'There is no alternative to postmetaphysical thinking': this statement, made by J#65533;rgen Habermas in 1988, has lost none of its relevance. Postmetaphysical thinking is, in the first place, the historical answer to the crisis of metaphysics following Hegel, when the central metaphysical figures of thought began to totter under the pressure exerted by social developments and by developments within science. As a result, philosophy's epistemological privilege was shaken to its core, its basic concepts were de-transcendentalized, and the primacy of theory over practice was opened to question. For good reasons, philosophy 'lost its extraordinary status', but as a result it also courted new problems. In Postmetaphysical Thinking II , the sequel to the 1988 volume that bears the same title (English translation, Polity 1992), Habermas addresses some of these problems.

    The first section of the book deals with the shift in perspective from metaphysical worldviews to the lifeworld, the unarticulated meanings and assumptions that accompany everyday thought and action in the mode of 'background knowledge'. Habermas analyses the lifeworld as a 'space of reasons' - even where language is not (yet) involved, such as, for example, in gestural communication and rituals. In the second section, the uneasy relationship between religion and postmetaphysical thinking takes centre stage. Habermas picks up where he left off in 1988, when he made the far-sighted observation that 'philosophy, even in its postmetaphysical form, will be able neither to replace nor to repress religion', and explores philosophy's new-found interest in religion, among other topics. The final section includes essays on the role of religion in the political context of a post-secular, liberal society.

    This volume will be of great interest to students and scholars in philosophy, religion and the social sciences and humanities generally.


  • Politics with Beauvoir : freedom in the encounter / Lori Jo Marso
    B 2430 B344 M37 2017
    In Politics with Beauvoir Lori Jo Marso treats Simone de Beauvoir's feminist theory and practice as part of her political theory, arguing that freedom is Beauvoir's central concern and that this is best apprehended through Marso's notion of the encounter. Starting with Beauvoir's political encounters with several of her key contemporaries including Hannah Arendt, Robert Brasillach, Richard Wright, Frantz Fanon, and Violette Leduc, Marso also moves beyond historical context to stage encounters between Beauvoir and others such as Chantal Akerman, Lars von Trier, Rahel Varnhagen, Alison Bechdel, the Marquis de Sade, and Margarethe von Trotta. From intimate to historical, always affective though often fraught and divisive, Beauvoir's encounters, Marso shows, exemplify freedom as a shared, relational, collective practice. Politics with Beauvoir gives us a new Beauvoir and a new way of thinking about politics--as embodied and coalitional.

  • Foucault : the birth of power / Stuart Elden
    B 2430 F724 E425 2017

    Michel Foucault's The Archaeology of Knowledge was published in March 1969; Discipline and Punish in February 1975. Although only six years apart, the difference in tone is stark: the former is a methodological treatise, the latter a call to arms. What accounts for the radical shift in Foucault's approach?

    Foucault's time in Tunisia had been a political awakening for him, and he returned to a France much changed by the turmoil of 1968. He taught at the experimental University of Vincennes and then moved to a prestigious position at the Coll#65533;ge de France. He quickly became involved in activist work concerning prisons and health issues such as abortion rights, and in his seminars he built research teams to conduct collaborative work, often around issues related to his lectures and activism.

    Foucault: The Birth of Power makes use of a range of archival material, including newly available documents at the Biblioth#65533;que nationale de France, to provide a detailed intellectual history of Foucault as writer, researcher, lecturer and activist. Through a careful reconstruction of Foucault's work and preoccupations, Elden shows that, while Discipline and Punish may be the major published output of this period, it rests on a much wider range of concerns and projects.


  • The Routledge handbook of epistemic injustice / edited by Ian James Kidd, José Medina, and Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr
    B 105 J87 R68 2017

    In the era of information and communication, issues of misinformation and miscommunication are more pressing than ever. Epistemic injustice - one of the most important and ground-breaking subjects to have emerged in philosophy in recent years - refers to those forms of unfair treatment that relate to issues of knowledge, understanding, and participation in communicative practices.

    The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject. The first collection of its kind, it comprises over thirty chapters by a team of international contributors, divided into five parts:

    Core Concepts Liberatory Epistemologies and Axes of Oppression Schools of Thought and Subfields within Epistemology Socio-political, Ethical, and Psychological Dimensions of Knowing Case Studies of Epistemic Injustice.

    As well as fundamental topics such as testimonial and hermeneutic injustice and epistemic trust, the Handbook includes chapters on important issues such as social and virtue epistemology, objectivity and objectification, implicit bias, and gender and race. Also included are chapters on areas in applied ethics and philosophy, such as law, education, and healthcare.

    The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is essential reading for students and researchers in ethics, epistemology, political philosophy, feminist theory, and philosophy of race. It will also be very useful for those in related fields, such as cultural studies, sociology, education and law.


  • Responsibility : the epistemic condition / edited by Philip Robichaud and Jan Willem Wieland
    BJ 1451 R466 2017
    Philosophers have long agreed that moral responsibility might not only have a freedom condition, but also an epistemic condition. Moral responsibility and knowledge interact, but the question is exactly how. Ignorance might constitute an excuse, but the question is exactly when. Surprisinglyenough, the epistemic condition has only recently attracted the attention of scholars. This volume sets the agenda. Sixteen new essays address the following central questions: Does the epistemic condition require akrasia? Why does blameless ignorance excuse? Does moral ignorance sustained by one'sculture excuse? Does the epistemic condition involve knowledge of the wrongness or wrongmaking features of one's action? Is the epistemic condition an independent condition, or is it derivative from one's quality of will or intentions? Is the epistemic condition sensitive to degrees of difficulty?Are there different kinds of moral responsibility and thus multiple epistemic conditions? Is the epistemic condition revisionary? What is the basic structure of the epistemic condition?

  • Wittgenstein and Merleau-Ponty / edited by Komarine Romdenh-Romluc
    B 3376 W564 W52135 2017

    Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Ludwig Wittgenstein are two of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century, yet their work is generally regarded as standing in contrast to one another. However, as this outstanding collection demonstrates they both reject a Cartesian picture of the mind and sought to offer an alternative that does justice to the role played by bodily action, language, and our membership within a community that shares a way of life.

    This is the first collection to compare and contrast the work of these two major philosophers. Fundamental topics and problems discussed include the role of community in their philosophies; Merleau-Ponty on description and depiction and Wittgenstein on saying and doing; the role of language; their treatment of expression; their relation to the philosophy of the Vienna Circle; solipsism; and rule-following.

    It is essential reading for anyone studying the work of Wittgenstein and Merleau-Ponty, as well as those interested in phenomenology, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of language.


  • Pragmatism as a way of life : the lasting legacy of William James and John Dewey / Hilary Putnam, Ruth Anna Putnam ; edited by David Macarthur
    B 832 P945 2017

    Throughout his diverse and highly influential career, Hilary Putnam was famous for changing his mind. As a pragmatist he treated philosophical "positions" as experiments in deliberate living. His aim was not to fix on one position but to attempt to do justice to the depth and complexity of reality. In this new collection, he and Ruth Anna Putnam argue that key elements of the classical pragmatism of William James and John Dewey provide a framework for the most progressive and forward-looking forms of philosophy in contemporary thought. The Putnams present a compelling defense of the radical originality of the philosophical ideas of James and Dewey and their usefulness in confronting the urgent social, political, and moral problems of the twenty-first century.

    Pragmatism as a Way of Life brings together almost all of the Putnams' pragmatist writings--essays they wrote as individuals and as coauthors. The pragmatism they endorse, though respectful of the sciences, is an open experience-based philosophy of our everyday lives that trenchantly criticizes the fact/value dualism running through contemporary culture. Hilary Putnam argues that all facts are dependent on cognitive values, while Ruth Anna Putnam turns the problem around, illuminating the factual basis of moral principles. Together, they offer a shared vision which, in Hilary's words, "could serve as a manifesto for what the two of us would like philosophy to look like in the twenty-first century and beyond."


  • Essays on paradoxes / Terence Horgan
    BC 199 P2 H67 2017
    This volume brings together many of Terence Horgan's essays on paradoxes: Newcomb's problem, the Monty Hall problem, the two-envelope paradox, the sorites paradox, and the Sleeping Beauty problem. Newcomb's problem arises because the ordinary concept of practical rationality constitutivelyincludes normative standards that can sometimes come into direct conflict with one another. The Monty Hall problem reveals that sometimes the higher-order fact of one's having reliably received pertinent new first-order information constitutes stronger pertinent new information than does the newfirst-order information itself. The two-envelope paradox reveals that epistemic-probability contexts are weakly hyper-intensional; that therefore, non-zero epistemic probabilities sometimes accrue to epistemic possibilities that are not metaphysical possibilities; that therefore, the available actsin a given decision problem sometimes can simultaneously possess several different kinds of non-standard expected utility that rank the acts incompatibly. The sorites paradox reveals that a certain kind of logical incoherence is inherent to vagueness, and that therefore, ontological vagueness isimpossible. The Sleeping Beauty problem reveals that some questions of probability are properly answered using a generalized variant of standard conditionalization that is applicable to essentially indexical self-locational possibilities, and deploys "preliminary" probabilities of such possibilitiesthat are not prior probabilities.The volume also includes three new essays: one on Newcomb's problem, one on the Sleeping Beauty problem, and an essay on epistemic probability that articulates and motivates a number of novel claims about epistemic probability that Horgan has come to espouse in the course of his writings onparadoxes. A common theme unifying these essays is that philosophically interesting paradoxes typically resist either easy solutions or solutions that are formally/mathematically highly technical. Another unifying theme is that such paradoxes often have deep-sometimes disturbing-philosophicalmorals.

  • The illusion of doubt / Genia Schönbaumsfeld
    B 837 S36 2016
    The Illusion of Doubt shows that radical scepticism is an illusion generated by a Cartesian picture of our evidential situation - the view that my epistemic grounds in both the "good" and the "bad" cases must be the same, and consists in information about an inner mental realm of experiencefrom which I must try to work my way out to what goes on "out there" in the external world. It is this picture which issues both a standing invitation to radical scepticism and ensures that there is no way of getting out of it while agreeing to the sceptic's terms. What we therefore need to do isnot try to answer the sceptical problem "directly", but rather to undermine the assumptions that it depends on. These are among the most ingrained in contemporary epistemology. They include the notion that radical scepticism can be motivated by the "closure" principle for knowledge, that the "Indistinguishability Argument" renders the Cartesian conception compulsory, that the "new evil genius thesis" iscoherent, and the demand for a "global validation" of our epistemic practices makes sense. Once these dogmas are undermined, the path is clear for a "realism without empiricism" that allows us to re-establish unmediated contact with the objects and persons in our environment which an illusion ofdoubt had threatened to put forever beyond our cognitive grasp.

  • Giving a damn : essays in dialogue with John Haugeland / edited by Zed Adams and Jacob Browning
    B 945 H3764 G58 2017

    A collection of essays that use John Haugeland's work on intentionality, embodiment, objectivity, and caring to explore contemporary issues in philosophy of mind.

    In his work, the philosopher John Haugeland (1945--2010) proposed a radical expansion of philosophy's conceptual toolkit, calling for a wider range of resources for understanding the mind, the world, and how they relate. Haugeland argued that "giving a damn" is essential for having a mind -- suggesting that traditional approaches to cognitive science mistakenly overlook the relevance of caring to the understanding of mindedness. Haugeland's determination to expand philosophy's array of concepts led him to write on a wide variety of subjects that may seem unrelated -- from topics in cognitive science and philosophy of mind to examinations of such figures as Martin Heidegger and Thomas Kuhn. Haugeland's two books with the MIT Press, Artificial Intelligence and Mind Design , show the range of his interests.

    This book offers a collection of essays in conversation with Haugeland's work. The essays, by prominent scholars, extend Haugeland's work on a range of contemporary topics in philosophy of mind -- from questions about intentionality to issues concerning objectivity and truth to the work of Heidegger. Giving a Damn also includes a previously unpublished paper by Haugeland, "Two Dogmas of Rationalism," as well as critical responses to it. Finally, an appendix offers Haugeland's outline of Kant's "Transcendental Deduction of the Categories."

    Contributors
    Zed Adams, William Blattner, Jacob Browning, Steven Crowell, John Haugeland, Bennett W. Helm, Rebecca Kukla, John Kulvicki, Mark Lance, Danielle Macbeth, Chauncey Maher, John McDowell, Joseph Rouse


  • Exemplarist moral theory / Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski
    BJ 37 Z34 2017
    In this book Linda Zagzebski presents an original moral theory based on direct reference to exemplars of goodness, modeled on the Putnam-Kripke theory which revolutionized semantics in the seventies. In Exemplarist Moral Theory, exemplars are identified through the emotion of admiration, which Zagzebski argues is both a motivating emotion and an emotion whose cognitive content permits the mapping of the moral domain around the features of exemplars. Using examples of heroes, saints, and sages, Zagzebski shows how narratives of exemplars and empirical work on the most admirable persons can be incorporated into the theory for both the theoretical purpose of generating a comprehensive theory, and the practical purpose of moral education and self-improvement. All basic moral terms, including "good person," "virtue," "good life," "right act," and "wrong act" are defined by the motives, ends, acts, or judgments of exemplars, or persons like that. The theory also generates an account of moral learning through emulation of exemplars, and Zagzebski defends a principle of the division of moral linguistic labor, which gives certain groups of people in a linguistic community special functions in identifying the extension or moral terms, spreading the stereotype associated with the term through the community, or providing the reasoning supporting judgments using those terms. The theory is therefore semantically externalist in that the meaning of moral terms is determined by features of the world outside the mind of the user, including features of exemplars and features of the social linguistic network linking users of the terms to exemplars. The book ends with suggestions about versions of the theory that are forms of moral realism, including a version that supports the existence of necessary a posteriori truths in ethics.

  • Everything in everything : Anaxagoras's metaphysics / Anna Marmodoro
    B 205 Z7 M37 2017
    Anaxagoras of Clazomenae (Vth century BCE) is best known in the history of philosophy for his stance that there is a share of everything in everything. He puts forward this theory of extreme mixture as a solution to the problem of change he and his contemporaries inherited from Parmenides -that what is cannot come from what is not (and vice versa). Yet, for ancient and modern scholars alike, the metaphysical significance of Anaxagoras's position has proven challenging to understanding. In Everything in Everything, Anna Marmodoro offers a fresh interpretation of Anaxagoras's theory of mixture, arguing for its soundness and also relevance to contemporary debates in metaphysics. For Anaxagoras the fundamental elements of reality are the opposites (hot, cold, wet, dry, etc.), whichMarmodoro argues are instances of physical causal powers. The unchanging opposites compose mereologically, forming (phenomenologically) emergent wholes. Everything in the universe (except nous) derives from the opposites. The opposite exist as endlessly partitioned; they can be scattered everywhereand be in everything. Mardomoro further shows that their extreme mixture is made possible by the omni-presence and hence com-presence in the universe, which is in turn facilitated by the limitless divisibility of the opposites. Anaxagoras tackles the logical consequences of the limitlessdivisibility of the elements. He is the first ante litteram "gunk lover" in the history of metaphysics. He also has a unique conception of (non-material) gunk and a unique power ontology, which Marmodoro refers to as "power gunk". Marmodoro investigates the nature of power gunk and the explanatoryutility of the concept for Anaxagoras, for his theory of extreme mixture. Whilst most defenders of an atomless universe nowadays argue for material gunk as a conceptual possibility (only), Anaxagoras argues for power gunk as the ontology of nature.

  • Routledge encyclopedia of philosophy CD-ROM / general editor, Edward Craig ; consultant editor, Luciano Floridi
    B 51 R68 1998 CD-ROM

  • Problems in aesthetics; an introductory book of readings
    BH 21 W4 1959

  • The metaphysical principles of virtue : part II of The metaphysics of morals / Immanuel Kant ; translated by James Ellington, with an introduction by Warner Wick
    B 2785 E5 E55 1964
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