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A - General Works - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in General Works that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 120 days.


  • The thing about museums : objects and experience, representation and contestation : essays in honour of professor Susan M. Pearce / edited by Sandra Dudley [and others]
    AM 151 T55 2012

    The Things about Museumsconstitutes a unique, highly diverse collection of essays unprecedented in existing books in either museum and heritage studies or material culture studies. Taking varied perspectives and presenting a range of case studies, the chapters all address objects in the context of museums, galleries and/or the heritage sector more broadly. Specifically, the book deals with how objects are constructed in museums, the ways in which visitors may directly experience those objects, how objects are utilised within particular representational strategies and forms, and the challenges and opportunities presented by using objects to communicate difficult and contested matters. Topics and approaches examined in the book are diverse, but include the objectification of natural history specimens and museum registers; materiality, immateriality, transience and absence; subject/object boundaries; sensory, phenomenological perspectives; the museumisation of objects and collections; and the dangers inherent in assuming that objects, interpretation and heritage are 'good' for us.


  • The digital humanities and the digital modern / James Smithies
    AZ105

  • Inside the lost museum : curating, past and present / Steven Lubar
    AM 111 L83 2017

    Curators make many decisions when they build collections or design exhibitions, plotting a passage of discovery that also tells an essential story. Collecting captures the past in a way useful to the present and the future. Exhibits play to our senses and orchestrate our impressions, balancing presentation and preservation, information and emotion. Curators consider visitors' interactions with objects and with one another, how our bodies move through displays, how our eyes grasp objects, how we learn and how we feel. Inside the Lost Museum documents the work museums do and suggests ways these institutions can enrich the educational and aesthetic experience of their visitors.

    Woven throughout Inside the Lost Museum is the story of the Jenks Museum at Brown University, a nineteenth-century display of natural history, anthropology, and curiosities that disappeared a century ago. The Jenks Museum's past, and a recent effort by artist Mark Dion, Steven Lubar, and their students to reimagine it as art and history, serve as a framework for exploring the long record of museums' usefulness and service.

    Museum lovers know that energy and mystery run through every collection and exhibition. Lubar explains work behind the scenes--collecting, preserving, displaying, and using art and artifacts in teaching, research, and community-building--through historical and contemporary examples. Inside the Lost Museum speaks to the hunt, the find, and the reveal that make curating and visiting exhibitions and using collections such a rewarding and vital pursuit.


  • Collecting the world : Hans Sloane and the origins of the British Museum / James Delbourgo
    AM 401 S58 D45 2017

    In 1759 the British Museum opened its doors to the general public--the first free national museum in the world. James Delbourgo's biography of Hans Sloane recounts the story behind its creation, told through the life of a figure with an insatiable ambition to pit universal knowledge against superstition and the means to realize his dream.

    Born in northern Ireland in 1660, Sloane amassed a fortune as a London society physician, becoming a member of the Whig establishment and president of the Royal Society and Royal College of Physicians. His wealth and contacts enabled him to assemble an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects--the most famous cabinet of curiosities of its time. For Sloane, however, collecting a world of objects meant collecting a world of people, including slaves. His marriage to the heir of sugar plantations in Jamaica gave Sloane access to the experiences of planters and the folkways of their human property. With few curbs on his passion for collecting, he established a network of agents to supply artifacts from China, India, North America, the Caribbean, and beyond. Wampum beads, rare manuscripts, a shoe made from human skin--nothing was off limits to Sloane's imagination.

    This splendidly illustrated volume offers a new perspective on the entanglements of global scientific discovery with imperialism in the eighteenth century. The first biography of Sloane based on the full range of his writings and collections, Collecting the World tells the rich and complex story of one of the Enlightenment's most controversial luminaries.


  • Dialogues / Gilles Deleuze, Claire Parnet
    AC 25 D42 1996

  • Data analytics in digital humanities Shalin Hai-Jew, editor
    AZ105

  • Scholarly adventures in digital humanities : making the modernist archives publishing project / Claire Battershill, Helen Southworth, Alice Staveley, Michael Widner, Elizabeth Willson Gordon, Nicola Wilson
    AZ105
    This book addresses the gap between print and digital scholarly approaches by combining both praxis and theory in a case study of a new international collaborative digital project, the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP). MAPP is an international collaborative digital project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, that uses digital tools to showcase archival traces of twentieth-century publishing. The twenty-first century has witnessed, and is living through, some of the most dynamic changes ever experienced in the publishing industry, arguably altering our very understanding of what it means to read a book.  This book brings to both general readers and scholarly researchers a new way of accessing, and thereby assessing, the historical meanings of change within the twentieth-century publication industry by building a resource which organises, interacts with, and uses historical information about book culture to narrate the continuities and discontinuities in reading and publishing over the last century.

  • Le savoir engagé/ sous la direction de Michel Dorais ; en collaboration avec Rachida Azdouz, Normand Baillargeon, Laurent Debesse, Alain Deneault, Patrick C. Pilotte, Chantal Santerre
    AZ 101 S16 2016eb

  • Not drowning but waving : women, feminism and the liberal arts / edited by Susan Brown [and 3 others]
    AZ 515 N68 2011eb
    "Not Drowning but Waving...gestures both at the difficulties faced by feminists in the humanities in Canada and at the possibilities of hope, of new 'waves' of feminism."Twenty-two essays explore topics such as feminism in the liberal arts disciplines; the relationship of the liberal arts to the larger university; the costs and rewards for women in administration; the corporatization of university campuses; intergenerational and transcultural tensions within feminist communities; balancing personal life with professional aspirations; the relationship of feminism to cultural studies; women, social justice, and the liberal arts. Not Drowning But Waving is a welcome progress report on the variety of feminisms at work in academe and beyond. It provides crucial insights for university administrators, faculty, and literate non-specialists interested in the Arts and Humanities.

  • Open source intelligence investigation / Babak Akhgar, P. Saski Bayerl, Fraser Sampson, editors
    Q A76.9 A25 2016eb

  • The crisis of 2 B.C. / Sir Ronald Syme
    AS 182 M823 1974 Heft 7
page last updated on: Tuesday 21 November 2017
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