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A - General Works - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in General Works that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 120 days.


  • Review of material relating to the entry of suspected war criminals into Australia
    KT AM397

  • Understanding and implementing inclusion in museums / Laura-Edythe Coleman
    AM 11 C59 2018eb

  • Tear gas epiphanies : protest, culture, museums / Kirsty Robertson
    AM 21 A2R63 2019

  • Human simulation : perspectives, insights, and applications / Saikou Y. Diallo, Wesley J. Wildman, F. LeRon Shults, Andreas Tolk, editors
    AZ 186 H86 2019eb

  • Prostitution, sexuality, and the law in ancient Rome / Thomas A.J. McGinn
    KJ A3468.P76 M39 1998
    This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to theirsocial context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.

  • Museum activism / edited by Robert R. Janes and Richard Sandell
    AM 7 M847 2019eb

    Only a decade ago, the notion that museums, galleries and heritage organisations might engage in activist practice, with explicit intent to act upon inequalities, injustices and environmental crises, was met with scepticism and often derision. Seeking to purposefully bring about social change was viewed by many within and beyond the museum community as inappropriately political and antithetical to fundamental professional values. Today, although the idea remains controversial, the way we think about the roles and responsibilities of museums as knowledge based, social institutions is changing. Museum Activism examines the increasing significance of this activist trend in thinking and practice.

    At this crucial time in the evolution of museum thinking and practice, this ground-breaking volume brings together more than fifty contributors working across six continents to explore, analyse and critically reflect upon the museum's relationship to activism. Including contributions from practitioners, artists, activists and researchers, this wide-ranging examination of new and divergent expressions of the inherent power of museums as forces for good, and as activists in civil society, aims to encourage further experimentation and enrich the debate in this nascent and uncertain field of museum practice.

    Museum Activism elucidates the largely untapped potential for museums as key intellectual and civic resources to address inequalities, injustice and environmental challenges. This makes the book essential reading for scholars and students of museum and heritage studies, gallery studies, arts and heritage management, and politics. It will be a source of inspiration to museum practitioners and museum leaders around the globe.


  • Deaccessioning today : theory and practice / Steven Miller
    AM 133 M55 2018

    Deaccessioning Today: Theory and Practice is a comprehensive international overview of deaccessioning. Author Steven Miller covers reasons for removing items from collections, looks at how and why deaccessioning occurs in museums around the world, and discusses recommended disposition procedures. Collections make museums unique. Getting and keeping physical evidence of the human and natural world, and doing so for the long term, is not done by any other organizations, entities, agencies, etc. This characteristic is essential to accept and understand regardless of a museum's operations. It is especially important when considering what to subtract from collections. Features include: -In-depth coverage of reasons for deaccessioning including ownership disputes, untenable conservation, redundancy, fakes and forgeries, source of income, safety reasons; -Processes for both museum-initiated and externally-initiated deaccessions; -Disposition options including sale, gift, exchange, demotion, destruction, and return; -Controversies surrounding deaccessions; Deaccessioning Today is for museum professionals, those who are responsible for museums (such as trustees, volunteers, elected officials, and donors), as well as the general public with an interest in how museums operate and why.


  • Making things and drawing boundaries : experiments in the digital humanities / Jentery Sayers, editor
    AZ 105 M1558 2017eb

    In Making Things and Drawing Boundaries , critical theory and cultural practice meet creativity, collaboration, and experimentation with physical materials as never before. Foregrounding the interdisciplinary character of experimental methods and hands-on research, this collection asks what it means to "make" things in the humanities. How is humanities research manifested in hand and on screen alongside the essay and monograph? And, importantly, how does experimentation with physical materials correspond with social justice and responsibility? Comprising almost forty chapters from ninety practitioners across twenty disciplines, Making Things and Drawing Boundaries speaks directly and extensively to how humanities research engages a growing interest in "maker" culture, however "making" may be defined.

    Contributors: Erin R. Anderson; Joanne Bernardi; Yana Boeva; Jeremy Boggs; Duncan A. Buell; Amy Burek; Trisha N. Campbell; Debbie Chachra; Beth Compton; Heidi Rae Cooley; Nora Dimmock; Devon Elliott; Bill Endres; Katherine Faull; Alexander Flamenco; Emily Alden Foster; Sarah Fox; Chelsea A. M. Gardner; Susan Garfinkel; Lee Hannigan; Sara Hendren; Ryan Hunt; John Hunter; Diane Jakacki; Janelle Jenstad; Edward Jones-Imhotep; Julie Thompson Klein; Aaron D. Knochel; J. K. Purdom Lindblad; Kim Martin; Gwynaeth McIntyre; Aurelio Meza; Shezan Muhammedi; Angel David Nieves; Marcel O'Gorman; Amy Papaelias; Matt Ratto; Isaac Record; Jennifer Reed; Gabby Resch; Jennifer Roberts-Smith; Melissa Rogers; Daniela K. Rosner; Stan Ruecker; Roxanne Shirazi; James Smithies; P. P. Sneha; Lisa M. Snyder; Kaitlyn Solberg; Dan Southwick; David Staley; Elaine Sullivan; Joseph Takeda; Ezra Teboul; William J. Turkel; Lisa Tweten.


  • Weeping for Dido : the classics in the Medieval classroom / Marjorie Curry Woods
    AZ 603 W66 2019eb

    Saint Augustine famously "wept for Dido, who killed herself by the sword," and many later medieval schoolboys were taught to respond in similarly emotional ways to the pain of female characters in Virgil's Aeneid and other classical texts. In Weeping for Dido, Marjorie Curry Woods takes readers into the medieval classroom, where boys identified with Dido, where teachers turned an unfinished classical poem into a bildungsroman about young Achilles, and where students not only studied but performed classical works.

    Woods opens the classroom door by examining teachers' notes and marginal commentary in manuscripts of the Aeneid and two short verse narratives: the Achilleid of Statius and the Ilias latina, a Latin epitome of Homer's Iliad. She focuses on interlinear glosses--individual words and short phrases written above lines of text that elucidate grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, but that also indicate how students engaged with the feelings and motivations of characters. Interlinear and marginal glosses, which were the foundation of the medieval classroom study of classical literature, reveal that in learning the Aeneid, boys studied and empathized with the feelings of female characters; that the unfinished Achilleid was restructured into a complete narrative showing young Achilles mirroring his mentors, including his mother, Thetis; and that the Ilias latina offered boys a condensed version of the Iliad focusing on the deaths of young men. Manuscript evidence even indicates how specific passages could be performed.

    The result is a groundbreaking study that provides a surprising new picture of medieval education and writes a new chapter in the reception history of classical literature.


  • The order of things : an archaeology of the human sciences / Michel Foucault
    AZ 101 F6913 1994
    With vast erudition, Foucault cuts across disciplines and reaches back into seventeenth century to show how classical systems of knowledge, which linked all of nature within a great chain of being and analogies between the stars in the heavens and the features in a human face, gave way to the modern sciences of biology, philology, and political economy. The result is nothing less than an archaeology of the sciences that unearths old patterns of meaning and reveals the shocking arbitrariness of our received truths.

    In the work that established him as the most important French thinker since Sartre, Michel Foucault offers startling evidence that "man"--man as a subject of scientific knowledge--is at best a recent invention, the result of a fundamental mutation in our culture.

  • Knowledge and the Public Interest, 1575-1725 / Vera Keller, University of Oregon
    AZ 604 K45 2015
    Many studies relate modern science to modern political and economic thought. Using one shift in order to explain the other, however, has begged the question of modernity's origins. New scientific and political reasoning emerged simultaneously as controversial forms of probabilistic reasoning. Neither could ground the other. They both rejected logical systems in favor of shifting, incomplete, and human-oriented forms of knowledge which did not meet accepted standards of speculative science. This study follows their shared development by tracing one key political stratagem for linking human desires to the advancement of knowledge: the collaborative wish list. Highly controversial at the beginning of the seventeenth century, charismatic desiderata lists spread across Europe, often deployed against traditional sciences. They did not enter the academy for a century but eventually so shaped the deep structures of research that today this once controversial genre appears to be a musty and even pedantic term of art.

  • Tear gas epiphanies : protest, culture, museums / Kirsty Robertson
    AM 21 A2R63 2019
    Museums are frequently sites of struggle and negotiation. They are key cultural institutions that occupy an oftentimes uncomfortable place at the crossroads of the arts, culture, various levels of government, corporate ventures, and the public. Because of this, museums are targeted by political action but can also provide support for contentious politics. Though protests at museums are understudied, they are far from anomalous. Tear Gas Epiphanies traces the as-yet-untold story of political action at museums in Canada from the early twentieth century to the present. The book looks at how museums do or do not archive protest ephemera, examining a range of responses to actions taking place at their thresholds, from active encouragement to belligerent dismissal. Drawing together extensive primary-source research and analysis, Robertson questions widespread perceptions of museums, strongly arguing for a reconsideration of their role in contemporary society that takes into account political conflict and protest as key ingredients in museum life. The sheer number of protest actions Robertson uncovers is compelling. Ambitious and wide-ranging, Tear Gas Epiphanies provides a thorough and conscientious survey of key points of intersection between museums and protest ? a valuable resource for university students and scholars, as well as arts professionals working at and with museums.

  • Excursions of an evolutionist
    AC 8 F56 1902

  • Questions d'hier et d'aujourd'hui
    AC 25 G3
Updated: Saturday 14 December 2019
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