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C - Auxiliary Sciences of History (Archaeology, Genealogy, ...) - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Auxiliary Sciences of History (Archaeology, Genealogy, ...) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 90 days.


  • Inventing modernity in medieval European thought, ca. 1100-ca.1550 / edited by Bettina Koch and Cary J. Nederman
    CB353

    One of the most challenging problems in the history of Western ideas stems from the emergence of Modernity out of the preceding period of the Latin Middle Ages. This volume develops and extends the insights of the noted scholar Thomas M. Izbicki into the so-called medieval/modern divide. The contributors include a wide array of eminent international scholars from the fields of History, Theology, Philosophy, and Political Science, all of whom explore how medieval ideas framed and shaped the thought of later centuries. This sometimes involved the evolution of intellectual principles associated with the definition and imposition of religious orthodoxy. Also addressed is the Great Schism in the Roman Church that set into question the foundations of ecclesiology. In the same era, philosophical and theoretical innovations reexamined conventional beliefs about metaphysics, epistemology and political life, perhaps best encapsulated by the fifteenth-century philosopher, theologian and political theorist Nicholas of Cusa.


  • Ghost galleon : the discovery and archaeology of the San Juanillo on the shores of Baja California / Edward P. Von der Porten
    CC 77 U5V66 2019eb

  • Technology and the growth of civilization Giancarlo Genta, Paolo Riberi
    CB478

  • Bioarchaeology of frontiers and borderlands / edited by Cristina I. Tica and Debra L. Martin ; foreword by Clark Spencer Larsen
    CC 79.5 H85B544 2019
    Frontiers and territorial borders are places of contested power where societies collide, interact, and interconnect. Using bioanthropological case studies from around the world, this volume explores how people in the past created, maintained, or changed their identities while living on the edge between two or more different spheres of influence. Essays in this volume examine borderland settings in cultural contexts that include Roman Egypt, Iron Age Italy, eleventh-century Iceland, and the precontact American Great Basin and Southwest. Contributors look at isotope data, skeletal stress markers, craniometric and dental metric information, mortuary arrangements, and other evidence to examine how frontier life can affect health and socioeconomic status. Illustrating the many meanings and definitions of frontiers and borderlands, they question assumptions about the relationships between people, place, and identity. As national borders continue to ignite controversy in today's society and politics, the research presented here is more important than ever. The long history of people who have lived in borderland areas helps us understand the challenges of adapting to these dynamic and often violent places. A volume in the series Bioarchaeological Interpretations of the Human Past: Local, Regional, and Global Perspectives, edited by Clark Spencer Larsen

  • The Cambridge companion to nineteenth-century thought / edited by Gregory Claeys
    CB 417 C36 2019eb

  • Afrofuturism rising : the literary prehistory of a movement / Isiah Lavender III
    CB 235 L38 2019eb

  • Afrofuturism 2.0 : the rise of astro-blackness / edited by Reynaldo Anderson and Charles E. Jones
    CB 235 A35 2016eb

  • Fifty early Medieval things : materials of culture in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages / Deborah Deliyannis, Hendrik Dey, and Paolo Squatriti
    CB 351 D43 2019eb

    Fifty Early Medieval Things introduces readers to the material culture of late antique and early medieval Europe, north Africa, and western Asia. Ranging from Iran to Ireland and from Sweden to Tunisia, Deborah Deliyannis, Hendrik Dey, and Paolo Squatriti present fifty objects--artifacts, structures, and archaeological features--created between the fourth and eleventh centuries, an ostensibly "Dark Age" whose cultural richness and complexity is often underappreciated. Each thing introduces important themes in the social, political, cultural, religious, and economic history of the postclassical era.

    Some of the things, like a simple ard (plow) unearthed in Germany, illustrate changing cultural and technological horizons in the immediate aftermath of Rome's collapse; others, like the Arabic coin found in a Viking burial mound, indicate the interconnectedness of cultures in this period. Objects such as the Book of Kells and the palace-city of Anjar in present-day Jordan represent significant artistic and cultural achievements; more quotidian items (a bone comb, an oil lamp, a handful of chestnuts) belong to the material culture of everyday life. In their thing-by-thing descriptions, the authors connect each object to both specific local conditions and to the broader influences that shaped the first millennium AD, and also explore their use in modern scholarly interpretations, with suggestions for further reading. Lavishly illustrated and engagingly written, Fifty Early Medieval Things demonstrates how to read objects in ways that make the distant past understandable and approachable.


  • Whose Middle Ages? : teachable moments for an ill-used past / Andrew Albin, Mary C. Erler, Thomas O'Donnell, Nicholas L. Paul, Nina Rowe, editors ; introduction by David Perry ; afterword by Geraldine Heng
    CB 351 W47 2019

  • Lithic Technologies in Sedentary Societies Settlement, Subsistence, and Social Organization in an Early Formative Mesoamerican Community / edited by Rachel A. Horowitz and Grant S. McCall
    CC 79.5 S76L57754 2018
    Lithic Technologies in Sedentary Societies examines lithic technology from ancient societies in Mesoamerica, the Near East, South Asia, and North America, showcasing the important contributions in-depth lithic analysis can make to the study of sedentary societies around the world. Using cutting-edge analytical techniques these case studies address difficult anthropological questions concerning economic, social, and political issues, as well as global trends in lithic production.

    Lithic analysis focused on sedentary societies, especially in places like Mesoamerica, has previously been neglected mostly because of the high frequency of informal tools, but such bias limits the ways in which both lithic production and economic organization are investigated. Bringing the importance of studying such technologies to the fore and emphasizing the vital anthropological questions that lithics can answer, Lithic Technologies in Sedentary Societies is a valuable resource for scholars and students of lithic technology and sedentary, complex societies.

    Contributors : Fumi Arakawa, Mary A. Davis, James Enloe, Dan Healan, Francesca Manclossi, Theodore Marks, Jayur Madhusudan Mehta, Jason S. R. Paling, Steve Rosen, John Whittaker

  • Jim Dator a noticer in time : selected work, 1967-2018 / Jim Dator
    CB158

  • A brief history of human culture in the 20th century / Qi Xin
    CB 425 X56 2019eb

  • What about the future? : new perspectives on planning, forecasting and complexity / Fred Phillips
    CB 158 P55 2019eb

  • The shaping of Western civilization / edited by Ludwig F. Schaefer, Daniel P. Resnick [and] George L. Netterville, III
    CB 59.S33

  • The Mitfords : letters between six sisters / edited by Charlotte Mosley
    CT 787 M57M56 2008
    Carefree, revelatory and intimate, this selection of unpublished letters between the six legendary Mitford sisters, compiled by Diana Mitford's daughter-in-law, is alive with wit, passion and heartbreak. The letters chronicle the social quirks and political upheavals of the twentieth century but also chart the stormy, enduring relationships between the uniquely gifted - and collectively notorious - Mitford sisters. There's Nancy, the scalding wit and bestselling novelist; Pamela, who craved a quiet country life; Diana, the fascist wife of Sir Oswald Mosley; Unity, whose obsession with Adolf Hitler led to personal tragedy; Jessica, the runaway communist; and Deborah, the socialite who became Duchess of Devonshire. Writing to one another to confide, tease, rage and gossip, the Mitford sisters set out, above all, to amuse. A correspondence of this scope is rare; a collection penned by six born storytellers is irreplaceable.

  • Seals Making and Marking Connections across the Medieval World / edited by Brigitte Miriam Bedos-Rezak
    CD 5507 S43 2018
    By placing medieval sealing practices in a global and comparative perspective, the essays gathered in this volume challenge the traditional understanding of seals as tools of closure and validation in use since the dawn of civilization. Far from being a universal technique, sealing is revealed as a flexible idiom, selectively deployed to mediate entangled identities: the introduction of Buddhism in early medieval China; the Islamization of Sasanian and Byzantine cultures; the balancing of Christian orthodoxy against classical and Muslim science; the development of civic consciousness in Byzantium; the efforts of tradesmen to brand merchandise for export; and the advancement of diplomacy from northern Europe to Indonesia. This examination of documentary seals, archaeologically recovered seal dies, and commercial and conceptual seals from cultures across the medieval world shows how skillful manipulation of their iconography, inscriptions, technology, and metaphorical meanings disseminated information, negotiated influences, asserted hegemony, and forged connections.

  • Entre disciplines et indiscipline, le patrimoine / sous la direction de Karine Hébert, Julien Goyette
    CC 135 E57 2018

  • From Gutenberg to Google : the history of our future / Tom Wheeler
    CB478

  • Richardson-Sinkler connections : planting, politics, horses, and family life, 1769-1853 / edited by Harriet Clare Sinkler Little
    CS 71 R522019
    Offering a richly textured picture of early national South Carolina, Richardson-Sinkler Connections includes more than 150 letters and documents left by the prominent Richardson and Sinkler families, who lived in the Santee region between Charleston and Columbia. Prosperous landowners related by both blood and marriage, the families made their fortunes as planters of indigo, rice, and cotton.The Sinkler family established homes south of the Santee River starting around 1700, and Richard Richardson arrived from Virginia about 1730. The second James Sinkler died in 1800, leaving four children, only one of whom had completed his education. Thirteen years old when his father died, the second son, William Sinkler, was mentored by his older first cousin/brother-in-law, state representative and later governor James B. Richardson, who closely followed the boy's progress as he pursued his studies in the North. William would go on to build Eutaw plantation in what is now Orangeburg County and, like his cousin James, pursue a passionate interest in horse breeding and racing, even building a racetrack on his property. In addition to revealing details about matters of politics, farming, education, travel, and racing, the letters also describe the difficulties of visiting across the Santee River, in the Sandhills where the Richardsons lived. The linchpin of the two families was James Sinkler's widow, Margaret, who was adored by her niece/stepdaughter, Ann, as well as by the Richardson nephews and many others. Her letters, and Ann's, open a fascinating window into women's lives of the era.Thorough annotations with genealogical notes and charts trace the complicated relationships between the Sinklers and Richardsons, as well as among other prominent families of the region and state. The book includes more than forty illustrations, including portraits, sketches, photographs of plantations and other sites, plats, and maps.

  • Lithic technologies in sedentary societies / edited by Rachel A. Horowitz and Grant S. McCall
    CC 79.5 S76L57754 2019
    Lithic Technologies in Sedentary Societies examines lithic technology from ancient societies in Mesoamerica, the Near East, South Asia, and North America, showcasing the important contributions in-depth lithic analysis can make to the study of sedentary societies around the world. Using cutting-edge analytical techniques these case studies address difficult anthropological questions concerning economic, social, and political issues, as well as global trends in lithic production.

    Lithic analysis focused on sedentary societies, especially in places like Mesoamerica, has previously been neglected mostly because of the high frequency of informal tools, but such bias limits the ways in which both lithic production and economic organization are investigated. Bringing the importance of studying such technologies to the fore and emphasizing the vital anthropological questions that lithics can answer, Lithic Technologies in Sedentary Societies is a valuable resource for scholars and students of lithic technology and sedentary, complex societies.

    Contributors : Fumi Arakawa, Mary A. Davis, James Enloe, Dan Healan, Francesca Manclossi, Theodore Marks, Jayur Madhusudan Mehta, Jason S. R. Paling, Steve Rosen, John Whittaker

  • New life for archaeological collections / edited by Rebecca Allen and Ben Ford
    CC 55 N49 2019eb
    New Life for Archaeological Collections explores solutions to what archaeologists are calling the "curation crisis," that is, too much stuff with too little research, analysis, and public interpretation. This volume demonstrates how archaeologists are taking both large and small steps toward not only solving the dilemma of storage but recognizing the value of these collections through inventorying and cataloging, curation, rehousing, artifact conservation, volunteer and student efforts, and public exhibits.

    Essays in this volume highlight new questions and innovative uses for existing archaeological collections. Rebecca Allen and Ben Ford advance ways to make the evaluation and documentation of these collections more accessible to those inside and outside of the scholarly discipline of archaeology. Contributors to New Life for Archaeological Collections introduce readers to their research while opening new perspectives for scientists and students alike to explore the world of archaeology. These essays illuminate new connections between cultural studies and the general availability of archaeological research and information. Drawing from the experience of university professors, government agency professionals, and cultural resource managers, this volume represents a unique commentary on education, research, and the archaeological community.

  • History and approaches to heritage studies / edited by Phyllis Mauch Messenger and Susan J. Bender ; foreword by Paul A. Shackel
    CC 135 H57 2019eb
    As more and more people are recognizing the need for accurately representing the story of the United States in public narratives, especially those told at museums and historic landmarks, heritage studies is emerging as an important program of study in universities across the country. These two collections are timely and valuable resources on the theory and practice of heritage education and its relationship to the discipline of archaeology. History and Approaches to Heritage Studies explores the historical development of cultural heritage theory and practice, as well as current issues in the field. This volume brings together archaeologists who are deeply engaged with a range of stakeholders in heritage management and training. Chapters contain useful reflections on working with descendant communities, local residents, community partners, and students in a variety of settings. With a focus on pedagogy throughout, topics include the importance of critical thinking skills, how technology has transformed education, gender issues in archaeology, minorities in heritage careers, NAGPRA and ethics education, archaeology field schools, and e-learning. Pedagogy and Practice in Heritage Studies presents teaching strategies for helping students think critically about the meanings of the past today. In these case studies, experienced teachers discuss ways to integrate heritage studies values into archaeology curricula, illustrating how the fields enrich each other. They argue that encouraging empathy can lead to awareness of the continuity between past and present, reflection on contemporary cultural norms, and engagement with issues of social and climate justice. These practical examples model ways to introduce diverse perspectives on history in pre-college, undergraduate, and graduate contexts. Emphasizing the importance of heritage studies principles and active learning in archaeological education, these handbooks provide tools to equip archaeologists and heritage professionals with collaborative, community-based, and activist approaches to the past.Volumes in the series Cultural Heritage Studies, edited by Paul A. Shackel

  • Archaeology of identity and dissonance : contexts for a brave new world / edited by Diane F. George and Bernice Kurchin
    CC 72.4 A7379 2019
    This volume demonstrates how humans adapt to new and challenging environments by building and adjusting their identities. By gathering a diverse set of case studies that draw on popular themes in contemporary historical archaeology and current trends in archaeological method and theory, it shows the many ways identity formation can be seen in the material world that humans create.The essays focus on situations across the globe where humans have experienced dissonance in the form of colonization, migration, conflict, marginalization, and other cultural encounters. Featuring a wide time span that reaches to the ancient past, examples include Roman soldiers in Britain, Vikings in Iceland and the Orkney Islands, sex workers in French colonial Algeria, Irish immigrants to the United States, an African American community in nineteenth-century New York City, and the Taino people of contemporary Puerto Rico. These studies draw on a variety of data, from excavated artifacts to landscape and architecture to archival materials.In their analyses, contributors explore multiple aspects of identity such as class, gender, race, and ethnicity, showing how these factors intersect for many of the individuals and groups studied. The questions of identity formation explored in this volume are critical to understanding the world today as humans continue to grapple with the legacies of colonialism and the realities of globalized and divided societies.

  • Integrating qualitative and social science factors in archaeological modelling / Mehdi Saqalli, Marc Vander Linden, editors
    CC 72.4 I58 2019

  • Encyclopedia of global archaeology Claire Smith, editor-in-chief
    CC 70 E544 2019eb

  • Entre disciplines et indiscipline, le patrimoine / sous la direction de Karine Hébert et Julien Goyette
    CC135

  • Advances in coastal geoarchaeology in Latin America : selected papers from the GEGAL Symposium at La Paloma, Uruguay / Hugo Inda Ferrero, Felipe García Rodríguez, editors
    CC77.5

  • Handbook of evolutionary research in archaeology / Anna Marie Prentiss, editor
    CC83

  • Transforming Heritage Practice in the 21st Century : Contributions from Community Archaeology / John H. Jameson, Sergiu Musteaţă, editors
    CC 77 C66T73 2019

  • Future studies and counterfactual analysis : seeds of the future / Theodore J. Gordon and Mariana Todorova
    CB161

  • Safeguarding Intangible Heritage : Practices and Politics / edited by Natsuko Akagawa and Laurajane Smith
    CC 135 S245 2019

    The UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage came into force in 2006, framing the international and national practices and policies associated with intangible cultural heritage. This volume critically and reflexively examines these practices and policies, providing an accessible account of the different ways in which intangible cultural heritage has been defined and managed in both national and international contexts. As Safeguarding Intangible Heritage reveals, the concept and practices of safeguarding are complicated and often contested, and there is a need for international debate about the meaning, nature and value of heritage and what it means to ¿safeguard¿ it.

    Safeguarding Intangible Heritage presents a significant cross section of ideas and practices from some of the key academics and practitioners working in the area, whose areas of expertise span anthropology, law, heritage studies, linguistics, archaeology, museum studies, folklore, architecture, Indigenous studies and history. The chapters in this volume give an overarching analysis of international policy and practice and critically frame case studies that analyze practices from a range of countries, including Australia, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, New Zealand, Taiwan, the UK and Zimbabwe.

    With a focus on conceptual and theoretical issues, this follow-up to Intangible Heritage, by the same editors, will be of great interest to students, scholars and professionals working in the fields of heritage and museum studies, heritage conservation, heritage tourism, global history, international relations, art and architectural history, and linguists.


  • The Disputatio chori et praetextati : the Roman calendar for beginners / Leofranc Holford-Strevens
    CE 46 H65 2019
    The first book of Macrobius' Saturnalia, written probably in the 430s AD, includes a historical exposition of the Roman calendar with a dramatic date some fifty years earlier, set in the mouth of the learned senator Vettius Agorius Praetextatus, followed by more technical detail at the request of an Egyptian named Horus, who as a foreigner is allowed to seek elementary information for which no one brought up in Roman culture would need to ask. This text was excerpted in early medieval Ireland, with some but by no means all its pagan matter excised, to provide an introduction for those who at best understood the rules of this recent import but not the rationale for them; it is quoted by Bede as Disputatio Chori et Praetextati, Chorus being a corrupted form of Horus. The excerpt took on a textual life of its own, which the present edition, the first devoted to the Disputatio rather than Macrobius, seeks to clarify; it examines the manuscripts and the relations between them, presents a critical edition with apparatus criticus and translation, and attaches a full-scale commentary concerned above all with the information provided in the text.

  • The quality of the archaeological record / Charles Perreault
    CC 80.4 P47 2019
    Paleobiology struggled for decades to influence our understanding of evolution and the history of life because it was stymied by a focus on microevolution and an incredibly patchy fossil record. But in the 1970s, the field took a radical turn, as paleobiologists began to investigate processes that could only be recognized in the fossil record across larger scales of time and space. That turn led to a new wave of macroevolutionary investigations, novel insights into the evolution of species, and a growing prominence for the field among the biological sciences.

    In The Quality of the Archaeological Record , Charles Perreault shows that archaeology not only faces a parallel problem, but may also find a model in the rise of paleobiology for a shift in the science and theory of the field. To get there, he proposes a more macroscale approach to making sense of the archaeological record, an approach that reveals patterns and processes not visible within the span of a human lifetime, but rather across an observation window thousands of years long and thousands of kilometers wide. Just as with the fossil record, the archaeological record has the scope necessary to detect macroscale cultural phenomena because it can provide samples that are large enough to cancel out the noise generated by micro-scale events. By recalibrating their research to the quality of the archaeological record and developing a true macroarchaeology program, Perreault argues, archaeologists can finally unleash the full contributive value of their discipline.

  • Stockport probate records / edited by C.B. Phillips and J.H. Smith
    CS 436 S815 S76 1985
Updated: Monday 11 November 2019
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