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G - Geography, Anthropology, Recreation - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Geography, Anthropology or Recreation that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Report / National Conference on Women and Sport, May 24-26 1974, Toronto
    GV 709 N325 1974

  • Toward a national policy on fitness and recreation : a discussion paper / Minister of State for Fitness and Amateur Sport
    GV 55 T68 1979

  • Summary of the employee fitness project report, 1978
    GV 436 C38 1980

  • The adventure / Giorgio Agamben ; translated by Lorenzo Chiesa
    G 522 A43 2018

    Agamben charts a journey that ranges from poems of chivalry to philosophy, from Yvain to Hegel, from Beatrice to Heidegger.

    An ancient legend identifies Demon, Chance, Love, and Necessity as the four gods who preside over the birth of every human being. We must all pay tribute to these deities and should not try to elude or dupe them. To accept them, Giorgio Agamben suggests, is to live one's life as an adventure--not in the trivial sense of the term, with lightness and disenchantment, but with the understanding that adventure, as a specific way of being, is the most profound experience in our human existence. In this pithy, poetic, and compelling book , Agamben maps a journey from poems of chivalry to philosophy, from Yvain to Hegel, from Beatrice to Heidegger. The four gods of legend are joined at the end by a goddess, the most elusive and mysterious of all: Elpis, Hope. In Greek mythology, Hope remains in Pandora's box, not because it postpones its fulfillment to an invisible beyond but because somehow it has always been already satisfied. Here, Agamben presents Hope as the ultimate gift of the human adventure on Earth.


  • Canadian carnival freaks and the extraordinary body, 1900-1970s / Jane Nicholas
    GV 1835.56 C2 N53 2018

    In 1973, a five year old girl known as Pookie was exhibited as "The Monkey Girl" at the Canadian National Exhibition. Pookie was the last of a number of children exhibited as 'freaks' in twentieth-century Canada.

    Jane Nicholas takes us on a search for answers about how and why the freak show persisted into the 1970s. In Canadian Carnival Freaks and the Extraordinary Body, 1900-1970s, Nicholas offers a sophisticated analysis of the place of the freak show in twentieth-century culture. Freak shows survived and thrived because of their flexible business model, government support, and by mobilizing cultural and medical ideas of the body and normalcy. This book is the first full length study of the freak show in Canada and is a significant contribution to our understanding of the history of Canadian popular culture, attitudes toward children, and the social construction of able-bodiness. Based on an impressive research foundation, the book will be of particular interest to anyone interested in the history of disability, the history of childhood, and the history of consumer culture.


  • Pilgrimage in practice : narration, reclamation and healing / edited by Ian S. McIntosh, E. Moore Quinn and Vivienne Keely
    G 156.5 R44 P55 2018
    Pilgrimage in Practice: Narration, Reclamation and Healing provides an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. It reveals many aspects of the practice of pilgrimage, from its nationalistic facets to its effect on economic development; from the impact of the internet to questions of globalization; from pilgrimage as protest to pilgrimage as creative expression in such media as film, art and literature.

    - Contests the very definitions of pilgrimage and challenges its paradigms.
    - Provides multiple perspectives on the subject to give a rounded and comprehensive review.
    - Covers past and present definitions of the sacred journey, the telling of stories, and historical injustices and their remedies through pilgrimage.

    Perhaps best understood as a form of heritage tourism or tourism with a conscience, pilgrimage (as with touristic travel) contains a measure of transformation that is often deep and enduring, making it a fascinating area of study. Reviewing social justice in the context of pilgrimage and featuring a diverse collection of interdisciplinary voices from across the globe, this book is a rich collection of papers for researchers of pilgrimage and religious and heritage tourism.

  • Map men : transnational lives and deaths of geographers in the making of East Central Europe / Steven Seegel
    G 67 S44 2018
    More than just colorful clickbait or pragmatic city grids, maps are often deeply emotional tales: of political projects gone wrong, budding relationships that failed, and countries that vanished. In Map Men , Steven Seegel takes us through some of these historical dramas with a detailed look at the maps that made and unmade the world of East Central Europe through a long continuum of world war and revolution. As a collective biography of five prominent geographers between 1870 and 1950--Albrecht Penck, Eugeniusz Romer, Stepan Rudnyts'kyi, Isaiah Bowman, and Count Pál Teleki-- Map Men reexamines the deep emotions, textures of friendship, and multigenerational sagas behind these influential maps.

    Taking us deep into cartographical archives, Seegel re-creates the public and private worlds of these five mapmakers, who interacted with and influenced one another even as they played key roles in defining and redefining borders, territories, nations­--and, ultimately, the interconnection of the world through two world wars. Throughout, he examines the transnational nature of these processes and addresses weighty questions about the causes and consequences of the world wars, the rise of Nazism and Stalinism, and the reasons East Central Europe became the fault line of these world-changing developments.

    At a time when East Central Europe has surged back into geopolitical consciousness, Map Men offers a timely and important look at the historical origins of how the region was defined--and the key people who helped define it.

  • Future remains : a cabinet of curiosities for the Anthropocene / edited by Gregg Mitman, Marco Armiero, and Robert S. Emmett
    GF 75 F88 2018
    What can a pesticide pump, a jar full of sand, or an old calico print tell us about the Anthropocene--the age of humans? Just as paleontologists look to fossil remains to infer past conditions of life on earth, so might past and present-day objects offer clues to intertwined human and natural histories that shape our planetary futures. In this era of aggressive hydrocarbon extraction, extreme weather, and severe economic disparity, how might certain objects make visible the uneven interplay of economic, material, and social forces that shape relationships among human and nonhuman beings?

    Future Remains is a thoughtful and creative meditation on these questions. The fifteen objects gathered in this book resemble more the tarots of a fortuneteller than the archaeological finds of an expedition--they speak of planetary futures. Marco Armiero, Robert S. Emmett, and Gregg Mitman have assembled a cabinet of curiosities for the Anthropocene, bringing together a mix of lively essays, creatively chosen objects, and stunning photographs by acclaimed photographer Tim Flach. The result is a book that interrogates the origins, implications, and potential dangers of the Anthropocene and makes us wonder anew about what exactly human history is made of.

  • Engaged anthropology : politics beyond the text / Stuart Kirsch
    GN 671 N5 K58 2018
    Does anthropology have more to offer than just its texts? In this timely and remarkable book, Stuart Kirsch shows how anthropology can--and why it should --become more engaged with the problems of the world. Engaged Anthropology draws on the author's experiences working with indigenous peoples fighting for their environment, land rights, and political sovereignty. Including both short interventions and collaborations spanning decades, it recounts interactions with lawyers and courts, nongovernmental organizations, scientific experts, and transnational corporations. This unflinchingly honest account addresses the unexamined "backstage" of engaged anthropology. Coming at a time when some question the viability of the discipline, the message of this powerful and original work is especially welcome, as it not only promotes a new way of doing anthropology, but also compellingly articulates a new rationale for why anthropology matters.

  • Strokes of genius : a history of swimming / Eric Chaline
    GV 836.4 C43 2017
    What could be better than diving into cool water on a hot day? In this enormously enjoyable and informative history of swimming, Eric Chaline sums up this most summery of moments with one phrase: pleasure beckons at the water's edge.
    Strokes of Genius traces the history of swimming from the first civilizations to its current worldwide popularity as a sport, fitness pastime, and leisure activity. Chaline explores swimming's role in ritual, early trade and manufacturing, warfare, and medicine, before describing its transformation in the early modern period into a leisure activity and a competitive sport--the necessary precursors that have made it the most common physical pastime in the developed world.

    The book celebrates the physicality and sensuality of swimming--attributes that Chaline argues could have contributed to the evolution of the human species. Swimming, like other disciplines that use repetitive movements to train the body and quiet the mind, is also a means of spiritual awakening--a personal journey of discovery. Swimming has attained the status of a cultural marker, denoting eroticism, leisure, endurance, adventure, exploration, and excellence.

    Strokes of Genius shows that there is not a single story of human swimming, but many currents that merge, diverge, and remerge. Chaline argues that swimming will become particularly important as we look toward a warmer future in which our survival may depend on our ability to adapt to life in an aquatic world.

  • Land bridges : ancient environments, plant migrations, and New World connections / Alan Graham
    GB 401.5 G73 2018
    Land bridges are the causeways of biodiversity. When they form, organisms are introduced into a new patchwork of species and habitats, forever altering the ecosystems into which they flow; and when land bridges disappear or fracture, organisms are separated into reproductively isolated populations that can evolve independently. More than this, land bridges play a role in determining global climates through changes to moisture and heat transport and are also essential factors in the development of biogeographic patterns across geographically remote regions.

    In this book, paleobotanist Alan Graham traces the formation and disruption of key New World land bridges and describes the biotic, climatic, and biogeographic ramifications of these land masses' changing formations over time. Looking at five land bridges, he explores their present geographic setting and climate, modern vegetation, indigenous peoples (with special attention to their impact on past and present vegetation), and geologic history. From the great Panamanian isthmus to the boreal connections across the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans that allowed exchange of organisms between North America, Europe, and Asia, Graham's sweeping, one-hundred-million-year history offers new insight into the forces that shaped the life and land of the New World.

  • China's Arctic ambitions and what they mean for Canada / P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Adam Lajeunesse, James Manicom, and Frédéric Lasserre
    G 606 L33 2018
    Chinas Arctic Aspirations is the first book to address Chinas ever increasing interest in the Arctic, and in Canadas Far North in particular. It offers a holistic approach to the subject - covering resource development, shipping, scientific research, governance, and military strategy - to better understand both Chinese motivations and the potential impacts of a greater Chinese presence in the circumpolar region. The book draws on extensive research into published Chinese government documentation, secondary source analysis, business and media reports, and the existing academic literature.

  • Indigenous tourism movements / edited by Alexis C. Bunten and Nelson H.H. Graburn
    G 156.5 H47 I53 2018

    Cultural tourism is frequently marketed as an economic panacea for communities whose traditional ways of life have been compromised by the dominant societies by which they have been colonized. Indigenous communities in particular are responding to these opportunities in innovative ways that set them apart from their non-Indigenous predecessors and competitors.

    Indigenous Tourism Movements explores Indigenous identity using "movement" as a metaphor, drawing on case studies from throughout the world including Botswana, Canada, Chile, Panama, Tanzania, and the United States. Editors Alexis C.Bunten and Nelson Graburn, along with a diverse group of contributors, frame tourism as a critical lens to explore the shifting identity politics of Indigeneity in relation to heritage, global policy, and development. They juxtapose diverse expressions of identity - from the commodification of Indigenous culture to the performance of heritage for tourists - to illuminate the complex local, national, and transnational connections these expressions produce.

    Indigenous Tourism Movements is a sophisticated, sensitive, and refreshingly frank examination of Indigeneity in the contemporary world.


  • Scribbling through history : graffiti, places and people from antiquity to modernity / edited by Chloé Ragazzoli, Ömür Harmanşah, Chiara Salvador and Elizabeth Frood
    GT 3912 S37 2018
    For most people the mention of graffiti conjures up notions of subversion, defacement, and underground culture. Yet, the term was coined by classical archaeologists excavating Pompeii in the 19th century and has been embraced by modern street culture- graffiti have been left on natural sites and public monuments for tens of thousands of years. They mark a position in time, a relation to space, and a territorial claim. They are also material displays of individual identity and social interaction. As an effective, socially accepted medium of self-definition, ancient graffiti may be compared to the modern use of social networks.

    This book shows that graffiti, a very ancient practice long hidden behind modern disapproval and street culture, have been integral to literacy and self-expression throughout history. Graffiti bear witness to social events and religious practices that are difficult to track in normative and official discourses. This book addresses graffiti practices, in cultures ranging from ancient China and Egypt through early modern Europe to modern Turkey, in illustrated short essays by specialists. It proposes a holistic approach to graffiti as a cultural practice that plays a key role in crucial aspects of human experience and how they can be understood.

  • Air quality and source apportionment / edited by Rebecca J. Sheesley
    GE 105 A37 2016

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is known to have far-ranging impacts on human health through to climate forcing. The characterization of emission sources and the quantification of specific source impacts to PM concentrations significantly enhance our understanding of, and our ability to, eventually predicting the fate and transport of atmospheric PM and its associated impacts on humans and the environment. Recent advances in source apportionment applications have contributed unique combinations of chemical and numerical techniques for determining the contributions of specific sources, including diesel exhaust and biomass burning. These advances also identify and help characterize the contributions of previously uncharacterized sources. Numerical modeling has also enabled estimations of contributions of emission sources to atmospherically processed PM in urban and rural regions. Investigation into the emissions sources driving air quality is currently of concern across the globe.

    This Special Issue offers studies at the intersection of air quality and source apportionment for study areas in China, Germany, Iceland, Mexico, and the United States. Studies cover diverse methods for chemical characterization and modeling of the impact of different emission sources on air quality.


  • Can democracy handle climate change? / Daniel J. Fiorino
    GE 170 F48 2018
    Global climate change poses an unprecedented challenge for governments across the world. Small wonder that many experts question whether democracies have the ability to cope with the causes and long-term consequences of a changing climate. Some even argue that authoritarian regimes are better equipped to make the tough choices required to tackle the climate crisis. In this incisive book, Daniel Fiorino challenges the assumptions and evidence offered by sceptics of democracy and its capacity to handle climate change. Democracies, he explains, typically enjoy higher levels of environmental performance and produce greater innovation in technology, policy, and climate governance than autocracies. Rather than less democracy, Fiorino calls for a more accountable and responsive politics that will provide democratically-elected governments with the enhanced capacity for collective action on climate and other environmental issues.

  • Off the map : lost spaces, invisible cities, forgotten islands, feral places, and what they tell us about the world / Alastair Bonnett
    G 70 B596 2014
    'Off the Map' shows the modern world from surprising new vantage points that will inspire urban explorers, and armchair travellers alike to consider a new way of understanding the world we live in.

  • Why the French don't like headscarves : Islam, the State, and public space / John R. Bowen
    GT 2112 B69 2007

    The French government's 2004 decision to ban Islamic headscarves and other religious signs from public schools puzzled many observers, both because it seemed to infringe needlessly on religious freedom, and because it was hailed by many in France as an answer to a surprisingly wide range of social ills, from violence against females in poor suburbs to anti-Semitism. Why the French Don't Like Headscarves explains why headscarves on schoolgirls caused such a furor, and why the furor yielded this law. Making sense of the dramatic debate from his perspective as an American anthropologist in France at the time, John Bowen writes about everyday life and public events while also presenting interviews with officials and intellectuals, and analyzing French television programs and other media.


    Bowen argues that the focus on headscarves came from a century-old sensitivity to the public presence of religion in schools, feared links between public expressions of Islamic identity and radical Islam, and a media-driven frenzy that built support for a headscarf ban during 2003-2004. Although the defense of laïcité (secularity) was cited as the law's major justification, politicians, intellectuals, and the media linked the scarves to more concrete social anxieties--about "communalism," political Islam, and violence toward women.


    Written in engaging, jargon-free prose, Why the French Don't Like Headscarves is the first comprehensive and objective analysis of this subject, in any language, and it speaks to tensions between assimilation and diversity that extend well beyond France's borders.

page last updated on: Friday 20 July 2018
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