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M - Music and Books on Music - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Music and Books on Music that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Song Loves the Masses : Herder on Music and Nationalism / Johann Gottfried Herder and Philip V. Bohlman
    ML 3545 H47 2017eb
    Distinguished ethnomusicologist Philip V. Bohlman compiles Johann Gottfried Herder's writings on music and nationalism, from his early volumes of Volkslieder through sacred song to the essays on aesthetics late in his life, shaping them as the book on music that Herder would have written had he gathered the many strands of his musical thought into a single publication. Framed by analytical chapters and extensive introductions to each translation, this book interprets Herder's musings on music to think through several major questions: What meaning did religion and religious thought have for Herder? Why do the nation and nationalism acquire musical dimensions at the confluence of aesthetics and religious thought? How did his aesthetic and musical thought come to transform the way Herder understood music and nationalism and their presence in global history? Bohlman uses the mode of translation to explore Herder's own interpretive practice as a translator of languages and cultures, providing today's readers with an elegantly narrated and exceptionally curated collection of essays on music by two major intellectuals.

  • The Forgotten Songs of the Newfoundland Outports : As Taken from Kenneth Peacock's Newfoundland Field Collection, 1951-1961 / Anna Kearney Guigne ; music re-edited and transcribed by Evelyn Osborne
    ML 3563.7 N4 F67 2016eb
    In 1951, musician Kenneth Peacock (1922-2000) secured a contract from the National Museum of Canada (today the Canadian Museum of History) to collect folksongs in Newfoundland. As the province had recently joined Confederation, the project was deemed a goodwill gesture, while at the same time adding to the Museum's meager Anglophone archival collections. Between 1951 and 1961, over the course of six field visits, Peacock collected 766 songs and melodies from 118 singers in 38 communities, later publishing two-thirds of this material in a three-volume collection, Songs of the Newfoundland Outports (1965). As the publication consists of over 1000 pages, Outports is considered to be a bible for Newfoundland singers and a valuable resource for researchers. However, Peacock's treatment of the material by way of tune-text collations, use of lines and stanzas from unpublished songs has always been somewhat controversial. Additionally, comparison of the field collection with Outports indicates that although Peacock acquired a range of material, his personal preferences requently guided his publishing agenda. To ensure that the songs closely correspond to what the singers presented to Peacock, the collection has been prepared by drawing on Peacock's original music and textual notes and his original field recordings. The collection is far-ranging and eclectic in that it includes British and American broadsides, musical hall and vaudeville material alongside country and western songs, and local compositions. It also highlights the influence of popular media on the Newfoundland song tradition and contextualizes a number of locally composed songs. In this sense, it provides a key link between what Peacock actually recordedand the material he eventually published. As several of the songs have not previously appeared in the standard Newfoundland collections, The Forgotten Songs sheds new light on the extent of Peacock's collecting. The collection includes 125 songs arranged under 113 titles along with extensive notes on the songs, and brief biographies of the 58 singers.Thanks to the Research Centre for the Study of Music Media and Place, a video of the launch event, held in St.John's, Newfoundland, is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch'v=ghj6E6-QiLI&t=21s.

  • The Jazz Republic : Music, Race, and American Culture in Weimar Germany / Jonathan O. Wipplinger
    ML 3918 G3 W57 2017eb

  • A Queerly Joyful Noise : Choral Musicking for Social Justice / Julia "Jules" Balen
    ML 3917 U6 B35 2017eb
    A Queerly Joyful Noise examines how choral singing can be both personally transformative and politically impactful. As they blend their different voices to create something beautiful, LGBTIQ singers stand together and make themselves heard. Comparing queer choral performances to the uses of group singing within the civil rights and labor movements, Julia "Jules" Balén maps the relationship between different forms of oppression and strategic musical forms of resistance. She also explores the potential this queer communal space creates for mobilizing progressive social action.

    A proud member of numerous queer choruses, Balén draws from years of firsthand observations, archival research, and extensive interviews to reveal how queer chorus members feel shared vulnerability, collective strength, and even moments of ecstasy when performing. A Queerly Joyful Noise serves as a testament to the power of music, intimately depicting how participation in a queer chorus is more than a pastime, but a meaningful form of protest through celebration.

  • The Sonic Color Line : Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening / Jennifer Lynn Stoever
    ML 3917 U6 S79 2016eb

  • Global Tarantella : Reinventing Southern Italian Folk Music and Dances / Incoronata Inserra
    ML 3660 I57 2017eb

  • The Changing Faces of Aawambo Musical Arts / Minette Mans ; with Ngoma Research Collective
    ML 3760 M363 2017eb
    How does a peoples' music reflect their history, their occupations, cultural beliefs and values? These are the core questions that this book addresses in relation to the Aawambo people of Namibia. The author, herself born and bred in Namibia, brings to the fore the nuanced views of different people, describing their personal musical experiences -- past as well as present. This is the first time that the music and stories of contemporary Namibian musicians is shared alongside those of the elderly. Similarly, it is the first time that some of the traditional Aawambo dances are analysed and described, abundantly illustrated with colourful photographs and several songs. Based on years of personal research, this book will appeal to research scholars, students and other interested readers alike, since its style is accessible but detailed, personal yet objective. Recommended for all those interested in culture, anthropology, the arts, and Namibian studies.

  • Cape Town Harmonies : Memory, Humour and Resilience / Armelle Gaulier and Denis-Constant Martin
    ML 355 S68 C374 2017eb
    "Cape Town's public cultures can only be fully appreciated through recognition of its deep and diverse soundscape. We have to listen to what has made and makes a city. The ear is an integral part of the 'research tools' one needs to get a sense of any city. We have to listen to the sounds that made and make the expansive 'mother city'. Various of its constituent parts sound different from each other ... [T]here is the sound of the singing men and their choirs ("teams" they are called) in preparation for the longstanding annual Malay choral competitions. The lyrics from the various repertoires they perform are hardly ever written down. [...] There are texts of the hallowed 'Dutch songs' but these do not circulate easily and widely. Researchers dream of finding lyrics from decades ago, not to mention a few generations ago - back to the early 19th century. This work by Denis Constant Martin and Armelle Gaulier provides us with a very useful selection of these songs. More than that, it is a critical sociological reflection of the place of these songs and their performers in the context that have given rise to them and sustains their relevance. It is a necessary work and is a very important scholarly intervention about a rather neglected aspect of the history and present production of music in the city." -- Shamil Jeppie, Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Cape Town

  • Break Beats in the Bronx : Rediscovering Hip-Hop's Early Years / Joseph C. Ewoodzie Jr
    ML 3531 E96 2017eb

  • Hong Kong Cantopop : A Concise History / Yiu-Wai Chu
    ML 3502 C58 H669 2017eb

  • The Mark of Criminality : Rhetoric, Race, and Gangsta Rap in the War-on-Crime Era / Bryan J. McCann
    ML 3531 M3 2017eb
    The Mark of Criminality illustrates the ways that the "war on crime" became conjoined--aesthetically, politically, and rhetorically--with the emergence of gangsta rap as a lucrative and deeply controversial subgenre of hip-hop.

    In The Mark of Criminality: Rhetoric, Race, and Gangsta Rap in the War-on-Crime Era , Bryan J. McCann argues that gangsta rap should be viewed as more than a damaging reinforcement of an era's worst racial stereotypes. Rather, he positions the works of key gangsta rap artists, as well as the controversies their work produced, squarely within the law-and-order politics and popular culture of the 1980s and 1990s to reveal a profoundly complex period in American history when the meanings of crime and criminality were incredibly unstable.

    At the center of this era--when politicians sought to prove their "tough-on-crime" credentials--was the mark of criminality, a set of discourses that labeled members of predominantly poor, urban, and minority communities as threats to the social order. Through their use of the mark of criminality, public figures implemented extremely harsh penal polices that have helped make the United States the world's leading jailer of its adult population.

    At the same time when politicians like Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, and Bill Clinton and television shows such as COPS and America's Most Wanted perpetuated images of gang and drug-filled ghettos, gangsta rap burst out of the hip-hop nation, emanating mainly from the predominantly black neighborhoods of South Central Los Angeles. Groups like NWA and solo artists (including Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and Tupac Shakur) became millionaires by marketing the very discourses political and cultural leaders used to justify their war on crime. For these artists, the mark of criminality was a source of power, credibility, and revenue. By understanding gangsta rap as a potent, if deeply imperfect, enactment of the mark of criminality, we can better understand how crime is always a site of struggle over meaning. Furthermore, by underscoring the nimble rhetorical character of criminality, we can learn lessons that may inform efforts to challenge our nation's failed policies of mass incarceration.

  • Changing the Tune : The Kansas City Women's Jazz Festival, 1978-1985 / Carolyn Glenn Brewer
    ML 38 K18 K364 2017eb

  • Dizzy, Duke, Brother Ray, and Friends : On and Off the Record with Jazz Greats / Lilian Terry
    ML 394 T46 2017eb

  • A Theory of Musical Narrative / Byron Almen
    ML 3800 A46 2008eb

    Byron Almén proposes an original synthesis of approaches to musical narrative from literary criticism, semiotics, historiography, musicology, and music theory, resulting in a significant critical reorientation of the field. This volume includes an extensive survey of traditional approaches to musical narrative illustrated by a wide variety of musical examples that highlight the range and applicability of the theoretical apparatus. Almén provides a careful delineation of the essential elements and preconditions of musical narrative organization, an eclectic analytical model applicable to a wide range of musical styles and repertoires, a classification scheme of narrative types and subtypes reflecting conceptually distinct narrative strategies, a wide array of interpretive categories, and a sensitivity to the dependence of narrative interpretation on the cultural milieu of the work, its various audiences, and the analyst. A Theory of Musical Narrative provides both an excellent introduction to an increasingly important conceptual domain and a complex reassessment of its possibilities and characteristics.


  • Interpreting Musical Gestures, Topics, and Tropes : Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert / Robert S. Hatten
    ML 3845 H35 2004eb

    Robert Hatten's new book is a worthy successor to his Musical Meaning in Beethoven, which established him as a front-rank scholar... in questions of musical meaning.... [B]oth how he approaches musical works and what he says about them are timely and to the point. Musical scholars in both musicology and theory will find much of value here, and will find their notions of musical meaning challenged and expanded." --Patrick McCreless

    This book continues to develop the semiotic theory of musical meaning presented in Robert S. Hatten's first book, Musical Meaning in Beethoven (IUP, 1994). In addition to expanding theories of markedness, topics, and tropes, Hatten offers a fresh contribution to the understanding of musical gestures, as grounded in biological, psychological, cultural, and music-stylistic competencies. By focusing on gestures, topics, tropes, and their interaction in the music of Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert, Hatten demonstrates the power and elegance of synthetic structures and emergent meanings within a changing Viennese Classical style.

    Musical Meaning and Interpretation--Robert S. Hatten, editor


  • Marcel Tabuteau : How Do You Expect to Play the Oboe If You Can't Peel a Mushroom? / Laila Storch
    ML 419 T125 S76 2008eb

    Laila Storch is a world-renowned oboist in her own right, but her book honors Marcel Tabuteau, one of the greatest figures in twentieth-century music. Tabuteau studied the oboe from an early age at the Paris Conservatoire and was brought to the United States in 1905, by Walter Damrosch, to play with the New York Symphony Orchestra. Although this posed a problem for the national musicians' union, he was ultimately allowed to stay, and the rest, as they say, is history. Eventually moving to Philadelphia, Tabuteau played in the Philadelphia Orchestra and taught at the Curtis Institute of Music, ultimately revamping the oboe world with his performance, pedagogical, and reed-making techniques.

    In 1941, Storch auditioned for Tabuteau at the Curtis Institute, but was rejected because of her gender. After much persistence and several cross-country bus trips, she was eventually accepted and began a life of study with Tabuteau. Blending archival research with personal anecdotes, and including access to rare recordings of Tabuteau and Waldemar Wolsing, Storch tells a remarkable story in an engaging style.


  • The Decibel Diaries : A Journey through Rock in 50 Concerts / Carter Alan
    ML 3534 A425 2017eb
    Sometimes a rock concert is more than just an event. Every so often a band's performance becomes a musical milestone, a cultural watershed, a political statement, and a personal apotheosis. On any given night a rock concert can tell the truth about who we are, where we are, and what's going on in music and life right now.

    In The Decibel Diaries, Carter Alan, longtime DJ and music director at WZLX in Boston, chronicles a lifetime in rock with a tour through fifty concerts that defined such moments--from Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young playing in the rain when Richard Nixon resigned to Talking Heads and the first stirrings of punk in the basement bars of New York and Boston to the bluegrass angel Alison Krauss and the adaptable veteran Robert Plant forging a plangent, plaintive postmodern synergy. For each event Alan shows us what it was like to be there and telescopes out to reveal how this show fit into the arc of the artist's career, the artist's place in music, and the music's place in the wider world. Taken together, The Decibel Diaries is a visceral and visionary portrait of nearly fifty years of rock 'n' roll.

  • Musical Maryland : A History of Song and Performance from the Colonial Period to the Age of Radio / David K. Hildebrand and Elizabeth M. Schaaf, with contributions from William Biehl
    ML 200.7 M25 H55 2017eb

    In Musical Maryland , the first comprehensive survey of the music emanating from the Old Line State, David K. Hildebrand and Elizabeth M. Schaaf explore the myriad ways in which music has enriched the lives of Marylanders. From the drinking songs of colonial Annapolis, the liturgical music of the Zion Lutheran Church, and the work songs of the tobacco fields to the exuberant marches of late nineteenth-century Baltimore Orioles festivals, Chick Webb's mastery on drums, and the triumphs of the Baltimore Opera Society, this richly illustrated volume explores more than 300 years of Maryland's music history.

    Beginning with early compositions performed in private settings and in public concerts, this book touches on the development of music clubs like the Tuesday Club, the Florestan Society, and H. L. Mencken's Saturday Night Club, as well as lasting institutions such as the Peabody Institute and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO). Yet the soundscape also includes militia quicksteps, sea chanteys, and other work songs. The book describes the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner"--perhaps Maryland's single greatest contribution to the nation's musical history. It chronicles the wide range of music created and performed by Maryland's African American musicians along Pennsylvania Avenue in racially segregated Baltimore, from jazz to symphonic works. It also tells the true story of a deliberately integrated concert that the BSO staged at the end of World War II.

    The book is full of musical examples, engravings, paintings, drawings, and historic photographs that not only portray the composers and performers but also the places around the state in which music flourished. Illuminating sidebars by William Biehl focus on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century song of the kind evoked by the USS Baltimore or inspired by the state's history, natural beauty, and romantic steamboats. The book also offers a sampling of the tunes that Maryland's more remarkable composers and performers, including Billie Holiday, Eubie Blake, and Cab Calloway, contributed to American music before the homogenization that arrived in earnest after World War II.

    Bringing to life not only portraits of musicians, composers, and conductors whose stories and recollections are woven into the fabric of this book, but also musical scores and concert halls, Musical Maryland is an engaging, authoritative, and bold look at an endlessly compelling subject.


  • Mastering the Flute with William Bennett / Roderick Seed ; foreword by William Bennett
    MT 340 S44 2018eb

    For the first time the exercises and teaching methods of world-renowned flutist William Bennett are featured in one workbook. After more than a decade of study with Bennett and many of his students, Roderick Seed has documented the tools that have made Bennett known for his ability to give the flute the depth, dignity, and grandeur of the voice or the stringed instrument. Topics range from how to overcome basic technical difficulties, such as pitch control, to the tools for phrasing, prosody, tone, and intonation needed for playing with different dynamics and ranges of expression. Advanced musicians will find useful exercises and techniques in this book that will deepen their knowledge and enjoyment of making music and help them in their quest to master the flute.


  • J.S. Bach. De h-Moll-Messe / Ignace Bossuyt
    MT 115 B2 B674 2017eb

  • The Eighteenth-Century Fortepiano Grand and Its Patrons : From Scarlatti to Beethoven / Eva Badura-Skoda
    ML 650 B33 2017eb

    In the late 17th century, Italian musician and inventor Bartolomeo Cristofori developed a new musical instrument--his cembalo che fa il piano e forte, which allowed keyboard players flexible dynamic gradation. This innovation, which came to be known as the hammer-harpsichord or fortepiano grand, was slow to catch on in musical circles. However, as renowned piano historian Eva Badura-Skoda demonstrates, the instrument inspired new keyboard techniques and performance practices and was eagerly adopted by virtuosos of the age, including Scarlatti, J. S. Bach, Clementi, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Presenting a rich array of archival evidence, Badura-Skoda traces the construction and use of the fortepiano grand across the musical cultures of 18th-century Europe, providing a valuable resource for music historians, organologists, and performers.


  • Loft Jazz : Improvising New York in the 1970s / Michael C. Heller
    ML 3508.8 N5 H45 2017eb
    The New York loft jazz scene of the 1970s was a pivotal period for uncompromising, artist-produced work. Faced with a flagging jazz economy, a group of young avant-garde improvisers chose to eschew the commercial sphere and develop alternative venues in the abandoned factories and warehouses of Lower Manhattan. Loft Jazz provides the first book-length study of this period, tracing its history amid a series of overlapping discourses surrounding collectivism, urban renewal, experimentalist aesthetics, underground archives, and the radical politics of self-determination.

  • Beyond Reason : Wagner contra Nietzsche / Karol Berger
    ML 410 W13 B45 2016eb
    Beyond Reason relates Wagner's works to the philosophical and cultural ideas of his time, centering on the four music dramas he created in the second half of his career: Der Ring des Nibelungen , Tristan und Isolde , Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg , and Parsifal . Karol Berger seeks to penetrate the "secret" of large-scale form in Wagner's music dramas and to answer those critics, most prominently Nietzsche, who condemned Wagner for his putative inability to weld small expressive gestures into larger wholes. Organized by individual opera, this is essential reading for both musicologists and Wagner experts.

  • Eight Lectures on Experimental Music / edited by Alvin Lucier
    ML 197 E33 2017eb
    In this brilliant collection, path-breaking figures of American experimental music discuss the meaning of their work at the turn of the twenty-first century. Presented between 1989 and 2002 at Wesleyan University, these captivating lectures provide rare insights by composers whose work has shaped our understanding of what it means to be experimental: Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Steve Reich, James Tenney, Christian Wolff, and La Monte Young. Collected here for the first time, together these lectures tell the story of twentieth-century American experimental music, covering such topics as repetition, phase, drone, duration, collaboration, and technological innovation. Containing introductory comments by Lucier and the original question and answer sessions between the students and the composers, this book makes the theory and practice of experimental music available and accessible to a new generation of students, artists, and scholars.

  • Building New Banjos for an Old-Time World / Richard Jones-Bamman
    ML 1015 B3 J66 2017eb

  • Fats Waller / Maurice Waller and Anthony Calabrese ; foreword by Michael Lipskin
    ML 417 W15 W3 2017eb

    Thomas "Fats" Waller was a legendary stride pianist, a wildly entertaining comedic singer, and the composer of such classic melodies as "Honeysuckle Rose," "Ain't Misbehavin'," and hundreds more. This is the intimate, behind-the-scenes story of his exuberant life, as told by his son, Maurice Waller. The public knew him as a charming, rascally, and effervescent showman. Friends like Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong, Irving Berlin, and George Gershwin knew him as a serious piano stylist and composer. Maurice Waller reveals the rarely seen side of Fats as a family man, struggling to juggle domestic affairs with the demands of being one of the era's busiest jazz men. From his earliest days as a child prodigy to his wild nights playing Harlem rent parties to his appearances on stages around the world and his eventual commercial success, it's all here. Few stories capture the frenetic energy of the age quite as well as the life story of this rollicking, hard living jazz icon.


  • Sonata Fragments : Romantic Narratives in Chopin, Schumann, and Brahms / Andrew Davis
    ML 1156 D38 2017eb

    In Sonata Fragments, Andrew Davis argues that the Romantic sonata is firmly rooted, both formally and expressively, in its Classical forebears, using Classical conventions in order to convey a broad constellation of Romantic aesthetic values. This claim runs contrary to conventional theories of the Romantic sonata that place this nineteenth-century musical form squarely outside inherited Classical sonata procedures. Building on Sonata Theory, Davis examines moments of fracture and fragmentation that disrupt the cohesive and linear temporality in piano sonatas by Chopin, Brahms, and Schumann. These disruptions in the sonata form are a narrative technique that signify temporal shifts during which we move from the outer action to the inner thoughts of a musical agent, or we move from the story as it unfolds to a flashback or flash-forward. Through an interpretation of Romantic sonatas as temporally multi-dimensional works in which portions of the music in any given piece can lie inside or outside of what Sonata Theory would define as the sonata-space proper, Davis reads into these ruptures a narrative of expressive features that mark these sonatas as uniquely Romantic.


  • Beyond Notation / Rebecca Y. Kim, Editor
    ML 410 B863 B49 2017eb

  • British Blues Network / Andrew Kellett
    ML 3521 K453 2017eb

  • Beyond the Crossroads : The Devil and the Blues Tradition / Adam Gussow
    ML 3521 G94 2017eb

  • Libby Larsen : Composing an American Life / Denise Von Glahn
    ML 410 L3206 V6 2017eb

  • Don't Give Your Heart to a Rambler : My Life with Jimmy Martin, the King of Bluegrass / Barbara Martin Stephens ; foreword by Murphy Hicks Henry
    ML 429 S84 A3 2017eb

  • Psychedelic Popular Music : A History through Musical Topic Theory / William Echard
    ML 3534 E25 2017eb

    Recognized for its distinctive musical features and its connection to periods of social innovation and ferment, the genre of psychedelia has exerted long-term influence in many areas of cultural production, including music, visual art, graphic design, film, and literature. William Echard explores the historical development of psychedelic music and its various stylistic incarnations as a genre unique for its fusion of rock, soul, funk, folk, and electronic music. Through the theory of musical topics--highly conventional musical figures that signify broad cultural concepts--and musical meaning, Echard traces the stylistic evolution of psychedelia from its inception in the early 1960s, with the Beatles' Rubber Soul and Revolver and the Kinks and Pink Floyd, to the German experimental bands and psychedelic funk of the 1970s, with a special emphasis on Parliament/Funkadelic. He concludes with a look at the 1980s and early 1990s, touching on the free festival scene, rave culture, and neo-jam bands. Set against the cultural backdrop of these decades, Echard's study of psychedelia lays the groundwork and offers lessons for analyzing the topic of popular music in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.


  • Finding Bix : The Life and Afterlife of a Jazz Legend / Brendan Wolfe
    ML 419 B25 W65 2017eb
    "Bix Beiderbecke was one of the first great legends of jazz. Among the most innovative cornet soloists of the 1920s and the first important white player, he invented the jazz ballad and pointed the way to (3z (Bcool (3y (Bjazz. But his recording career lasted just six years; he drank himself to death in 1931 at the age of twenty-eight. It was this meteoric rise and fall, combined with the searing originality of his playing and the mystery of his character (who was Bix?--not even his friends or family seemed to know) that inspired subsequent generations to imitate him, worship him, and write about him. It also provoked Brendan Wolfe's Finding Bix a personal and often surprising attempt to connect music, history, and legend"--Amazon.

  • Gold Experience : Following Prince in the '90s / Jim Walsh
    ML 420 P974 W36 2017eb

  • Cornell '77 / Peter Conners
    ML 421 G72 C64 2017eb

    On May 8, 1977, at Barton Hall, on the Cornell University campus, in front of 8,500 eager fans, the Grateful Dead played a show so significant that the Library of Congress inducted it into the National Recording Registry. The band had just released Terrapin Station and was still finding its feet after an extended hiatus. In 1977, the Grateful Dead reached a musical peak, and their East Coast spring tour featured an exceptional string of performances, including the one at Cornell.

    Many Deadheads claim that the quality of the live recording of the show made by Betty Cantor-Jackson (a member of the crew) elevated its importance. Once those recordings--referred to as "Betty Boards"--began to circulate among Deadheads, the reputation of the Cornell '77 show grew exponentially. With time the show at Barton Hall acquired legendary status in the community of Deadheads and audiophiles.

    Rooted in dozens of interviews--including a conversation with Betty Cantor-Jackson about her recording--and accompanied by a dazzling selection of never-before-seen concert photographs, Cornell '77 is about far more than just a single Grateful Dead concert. It is a social and cultural history of one of America's most enduring and iconic musical acts, their devoted fans, and a group of Cornell students whose passion for music drove them to bring the Dead to Barton Hall. Peter Conners has intimate knowledge of the fan culture surrounding the Dead, and his expertise brings the show to life. He leads readers through a song-by-song analysis of the performance, from "New Minglewood Blues" to "One More Saturday Night," and conveys why, forty years later, Cornell '77 is still considered a touchstone in the history of the band.

    As Conners notes in his Prologue: "You will hear from Deadheads who went to the show. You will hear from non-Deadhead Cornell graduates who were responsible for putting on the show in the first place. You will hear from record executives, academics, scholars, Dead family members, tapers, traders, and trolls. You will hear from those who still live the Grateful Dead every day. You will hear from those who would rather keep their Grateful Dead passions private for reasons both personal and professional. You will hear stories about the early days of being a Deadhead and what it was like to attend, and perhaps record, those early shows, including Cornell '77."


  • China and the West : Music, Representation, and Reception / edited by Hon-Lun Yang and Michael Saffle
    ML 193 C45 2017eb
    Western music reached China nearly four centuries ago, with the arrival of Christian missionaries, yet only within the last century has Chinese music absorbed its influence. The emergence of "Westernized" music from China -concurrent with the technological advances that have made global culture widely accessible - has not established a prominent presence in the West. China and the West brings together essays on centuries of Sino-Western musical exchange by musicologists, ethnomusicologists, and music theorists from around the world. It opens with a look at theoretical approaches of prior studies of musical encounters and a comprehensive survey of the intercultural and cross-cultural theoretical frameworks-exoticism, orientalism, globalization, transculturation, and hybridization-that inform these essays. Part I focuses on the actual encounters between Chinese and European musicians, their instruments and institutions, and the compositions inspired by these encounters, while Part II examines theatricalized and mediated East-West cultural exchanges, which often drew on stereotypical tropes, resulting in performances more inventive than accurate.Part III looks at the musical language, sonority, and subject matters of "intercultural" compositions by Eastern and Western composers. Essays in Part IV address reception studies and consider the ways in which differences are articulated in musical discourse by actors serving different purposes, whether self-promotion, commercial ma

  • Theorizing Sound Writing / edited by Deborah Kapchan
    ML 3797 T46 2017eb
    The study of listening--aurality--and its relation to writing is the subject of this eclectic edited volume. Theorizing Sound Writing explores the relationship between sound, theory, language, and inscription. This volume contains an impressive lineup of scholars from anthropology, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, and sound studies. The contributors write about sound in their ongoing work, while also making an intervention into the ethics of academic knowledge, one in which listening is the first step not only in translating sound into words but also in compassionate scholarship.

  • English Pastoral Music : From Arcadia to Utopia, 1900-1955 / Eric Saylor
    ML 286.5 S19 2017eb
    Covering works by popular figures like Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst as well as less familiar English composers, Eric Saylor's pioneering book examines pastoral music's critical, theoretical, and stylistic foundations alongside its creative manifestations in the contexts of Arcadia, war, landscape, and the Utopian imagination. As Saylor shows, pastoral music adapted and transformed established musical and aesthetic conventions that reflected the experiences of British composers and audiences during the early twentieth century. By approaching pastoral music as a cultural phenomenon dependent on time and place, Saylor forcefully challenges the body of critical opinion that has long dismissed it as antiquated, insular, and reactionary.

  • It's Just the Normal Noises : Marcus, Guralnick, No Depression, and the Mystery of Americana Music / Timothy Gray
    ML 3785 G73 2017eb

  • Modernism and Opera / edited by Richard Begam and Matthew Wilson Smith
    ML 1705 M63 2016eb

    At first glance, modernism and opera may seem like strange bedfellows--the former hostile to sentiment, the latter wearing its heart on its sleeve. And yet these apparent opposites attract: many operas are aesthetically avant-garde, politically subversive, and socially transgressive. From the proto-modernist strains of Richard Wagner's Parsifal through the twenty-first-century modernism of Kaija Saariaho's L'amour de loin , the duet between modernism and opera, at turns harmonious and dissonant, has been one of the central artistic events of modernity. Despite this centrality, scholars of modernist literature only rarely venture into opera, and music scholars generally return the favor by leaving literature to one side. But opera, that grand cauldron of the arts, demands that scholars, too, share the stage with one another.

    In Modernism and Opera , Richard Begam and Matthew Wilson Smith bring together musicologists, literary critics, and theater scholars for the first time in a mutual endeavor to trace certain key moments in the history of modernism and opera. This innovative volume includes essays from some of the most notable scholars in their fields and covers works as diverse as Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande , Bartók's Bluebeard's Castle , Berg's Wozzeck , Janáček's Makropulos Case , Thomson's Four Saints in Three Acts , Strauss's Arabella , Schoenberg's Moses und Aron , Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress , Britten's Gloriana , and Messiaen's Saint François d'Assise .

    A collaborative study of the ultimate collaborative art form, Modernism and Opera reveals how modernism and opera illuminate each other and, more generally, the culture of the twentieth century. It also addresses a number of issues crucial for understanding the relation between modernism and opera, focusing in particular on intermediality (how modernism integrates music, literature, and drama into opera) and anti-theatricality (how opera responds to modernism's apparent antipathy to theatricality). This captivating book--the first of its kind--will appeal to scholars of literature, music, theater, and modernity as well as to sophisticated opera lovers everywhere.


  • All Over the Map : True Heroes of Texas Music / by Michael Corcoran
    ML 394 C66 2017eb

  • Sémiotique et vécu musical : du sens à l 'expérience, de l'expérience au sens / sous la direction de Constantino Maeder et Mark Reybrouck
    ML 3845 S468 2016eb

  • Harps and Harpists, Revised Edition / Roslyn Rensch
    ML 1005 R43 2007eb

    Revising her classic 1989 book Harps and Harpists, Roslyn Rensch expands her authoritative history of this timeless instrument. This lavishly illustrated edition, with 137 black-and-white images and 24 color plates, surveys the progress of the harp from antiquity to the present day. The new edition includes two new chapters; an extensive bibliography and index; personal anecdotes of the author's studies under Alberto Salvi; and an appendix on the Roslyn Rensch Papers and Harp Collection, which are housed at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign.


  • Charles Ives's Concord : Essays after a Sonata / Kyle Gann
    ML 410 I94 G36 2017eb

  • Ferruccio Busoni and His Legacy / Erinn E. Knyt
    ML 410 B98 K59 2017eb

    Many students of renowned composer, conductor, and teacher Ferruccio Busoni had illustrious careers of their own, yet the extent to which their mentor's influence helped shape their success was largely unexplored until now. Through rich archival research including correspondence, essays, and scores, Erinn E. Knyt presents an evocative account of Busoni's idiosyncratic pedagogy--focused on aesthetic ideals rather than methodologies or techniques--and how this teaching style and philosophy can be seen and heard in the Nordic-inspired musical works of Sibelius, the unusual soundscapes of Varèse, the polystylistic meldings of music and technology in Louis Gruenberg's radio operas and film scores, the electronic music of Otto Luening, and the experimentalism of Philip Jarnach. Equal parts critical biography and interpretive analysis, Knyt's work compels a reconsideration of Busoni's legacy and puts forth the notion of a "Busoni School" as one that shaped the trajectory of twentieth-century music.


  • Hip Hop at Europe's Edge : Music, Agency, and Social Change / edited by Milosz Miszczynski and Adriana Helbig
    ML 3531 H567 2017eb

    Responding to the development of a lively hip hop culture in Central and Eastern European countries, this interdisciplinary study demonstrates how a universal model of hip hop serves as a contextually situated platform of cultural exchange and becomes locally inflected. After the Soviet Union fell, hip hop became popular in urban environments in the region, but it has often been stigmatized as inauthentic, due to an apparent lack of connection to African American historical roots and black identity. Originally strongly influenced by aesthetics from the US, hip hop in Central and Eastern Europe has gradually developed unique, local trajectories, a number of which are showcased in this volume. On the one hand, hip hop functions as a marker of Western cosmopolitanism and democratic ideology, but as the contributors show, it is also a malleable genre that has been infused with so much local identity that it has lost most of its previous associations with "the West" in the experiences of local musicians, audiences, and producers. Contextualizing hip hop through the prism of local experiences and regional musical expressions, these valuable case studies reveal the broad spectrum of its impact on popular culture and youth identity in the post-Soviet world.


  • Lou Harrison : American Musical Maverick / Bill Alves and Brett Campbell
    ML 410 H2066 A7 2017eb

    American composer Lou Harrison (1917-2003) is perhaps best known for challenging the traditional musical establishment along with his contemporaries and close colleagues: composers John Cage, Aaron Copland, Virgil Thomson, and Leonard Bernstein; Living Theater founder, Judith Malina; and choreographer, Merce Cunningham. Today, musicians from Bang on a Can to Björk are indebted to the cultural hybrids Harrison pioneered half a century ago. His explorations of new tonalities at a time when the rest of the avant garde considered such interests heretical set the stage for minimalism and musical post-modernism. His propulsive rhythms and ground-breaking use of percussion have inspired choreographers from Merce Cunningham to Mark Morris, and he is considered the godfather of the so-called "world music" phenomenon that has invigorated Western music with global sounds over the past two decades.

    In this biography, authors Bill Alves and Brett Campbell trace Harrison's life and career from the diverse streets of San Francisco, where he studied with music experimentalist Henry Cowell and Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg, and where he discovered his love for all things non-traditional (Beat poetry, parties, and men); to the competitive performance industry in New York, where he subsequently launched his career as a composer, conducted Charles Ives's Third Symphony at Carnegie Hall (winning the elder composer a Pulitzer Prize), and experienced a devastating mental breakdown; to the experimental arts institution of Black Mountain College where he was involved in the first "happenings" with Cage, Cunningham, and others; and finally, back to California, where he would become a strong voice in human rights and environmental campaigns and compose some of the most eclectic pieces of his career.


  • I Hear a Symphony : Motown and Crossover R&B / Andrew Flory
    ML 3792 M67 F56 2017eb

  • Live from Aggieland : Legendary Performances in the Brazos Valley / Rob Clark
    ML 3477.7 T35 C53 2017eb

  • Beyond Bach : Music and Everyday Life in the Eighteenth Century / Andrew Talle
    ML 3917 G3 T35 2017eb

  • Lineage of Loss : Counternarratives of North Indian Music / Max Katz
    ML 3917 I4K37 2017eb
    In the middle of the nineteenth century a new family of hereditary musicians emerged in the royal court of Lucknow and subsequently rose to the heights of renown throughout North India. Today this musical lineage, or ghar n , lives on in the music and memories of only a small handful of descendants and players of the family instrument, the sarod. Drawing on six years of ethnographic and archival research, and fifteen years of musical apprenticeship, Max Katz explores the oral history and written record of the Lucknow ghar n ,tracing its displacement, loss of prestige, and erasure from the collective memory. In doing so he illuminates a hidden history of ideological and social struggle in North Indian music culture, intervenes in ongoing debates over the anti-Muslim agenda of Hindustani music's reform movement, and reanimates a lost vision in which Muslim scholar-artists defined the music of the nation. An interdisciplinary, postmodern counter-history, Lineage of Loss offers a new and unsettling narrative of Hindustani music's encounter with modernity.

  • Beautiful Politics of Music : Trova in Yucatán, Mexico / Gabriela Vargas-Cetina
    ML 3485.7 Y83V37 2017eb

  • Live and recorded : music experience in the digital millennium / Yngvar Kjus
    ML3470

  • Punk is dead : modernity killed every night / edited by Richard Cabut and Andrew Gallix
    ML 3534 P865 2017
    This original collection of insight, analysis and conversation charts the course of punk from its underground origins, when it was an un-formed and utterly alluring near-secret, through its rapid development. Punk is Dead: Modernity Killed Every Night takes in sex, style, politics and philosophy, filtered through punk experience, while believing in the ruins of memory, to explore a past whose essence is always elusive.

  • Making music : 74 creative strategies for electronic music producers / Dennis DeSantis
    MT 56 D47 2015

  • Book of proceedings of the 26th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for Music Therapy 1999 : tuning into health : theme and variations
    ML 3920 C19 1999

  • Evolution of rāga and tāla in Indian music / M.R. Gautam
    ML 338 G27 1989
page last updated on: Saturday 26 May 2018
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