« Back | Print 
Concordia.ca   /   Library   /   About the library   /   News   /   Acquisitions

New books by subject

sort items by: 
 RSS

Q - Science - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Science that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 30 days.


  • Scientific Pluralism Reconsidered : A New Approach to the (Dis)Unity of Science / Stephanie Ruphy
    Q 175 R8513 2016eb

  • The Foundations of Scientific Inference : 50th Anniversary Edition / [by] Wesley C. Salmon
    Q 175 S234eb

  • The Nature of Spectacle : On Images, Money, and Conserving Capitalism / Jim Igoe
    QH 75 I355 2017eb

  • The Violence of Climate Change : Lessons of Resistance from Nonviolent Activists / Kevin J. O'Brien
    QC 903 O36 2017eb

  • Undone Science : Social Movements, Mobilized Publics, and Industrial Transitions / David J. Hess
    Q 175.5 H473 2016eb

    A theoretical integration of science and technology studies and social movement studies that finds both common ground and "undone" research.

    As the fields of social movement studies (SMS) and science and technology studies (STS) have diversified in topical focus, they have moved closer to each other. SMS has turned toward the study of nonstate targets and institutionalized repertoires of action, just as STS has turned to expertise and publics. In Undone Science , David Hess argues that a theoretical integration of core concepts in the two fields is now possible, and he presents just such a synthesis. Hess focuses on industrial transition movements--mobilized counterpublics of activists, advocates, entrepreneurs, and other agents of change--and examines several areas of common ground between the two fields relevant to these movements. His account reveals the problem of "undone science"--areas of research potentially valuable to the goals of industrial transition movements that have been systematically ignored.

    Each chapter begins with a problem in SMS, discusses the relevant STS literature, describes new concepts and findings that have emerged, and offers applications to examples that range from nanotechnology and climate science denialism to conflicts based on race, class, and gender. Topics include the epistemic dimension of the political opportunity structure, networks of counterpublic knowledge, and regime resistance in industrial transition.


  • Citizen Science in the Digital Age : Rhetoric, Science, and Public Engagement / James Wynn
    Q 175.5 W96 2017eb

  • Rebel Genius : Warren S. McCulloch's Transdisciplinary Life in Science / Tara H. Abraham
    QP 353.4 M33 A27 2016eb

    The life and work of a scientist who spent his career crossing disciplinary boundaries--from experimental neurology to psychiatry to cybernetics to engineering.

    Warren S. McCulloch (1898-1969) adopted many identities in his scientific life--among them philosopher, poet, neurologist, neurophysiologist, neuropsychiatrist, collaborator, theorist, cybernetician, mentor, engineer. He was, writes Tara Abraham in this account of McCulloch's life and work, "an intellectual showman," and performed this part throughout his career. While McCulloch claimed a common thread in his work was the problem of mind and its relationship to the brain, there was much more to him than that. In Rebel Genius , Abraham uses McCulloch's life as a window on a past scientific age, showing the complex transformations that took place in American brain and mind science in the twentieth century--particularly those surrounding the cybernetics movement.

    Abraham describes McCulloch's early work in neuropsychiatry, and his emerging identity as a neurophysiologist. She explores his transformative years at the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute and his work with Walter Pitts--often seen as the first iteration of "artificial intelligence" but here described as stemming from the new tradition of mathematical treatments of biological problems. Abraham argues that McCulloch's dual identities as neuropsychiatrist and cybernetician are inseparable. He used the authority he gained in traditional disciplinary roles as a basis for posing big questions about the brain and mind as a cybernetician. When McCulloch moved to the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT, new practices for studying the brain, grounded in mathematics, philosophy, and theoretical modeling, expanded the relevance and ramifications of his work. McCulloch's transdisciplinary legacies anticipated today's multidisciplinary field of cognitive science.


  • Science Without Frontiers : Cosmopolitanism and National Interests in the World of Learning, 1870-1940 / Robert Fox
    Q 223 F698 2016eb

  • Vivarium : Experimental, Quantitative, and Theoretical Biology at Vienna's Biologische Versuchsanstalt / edited by Gerd B. Müller
    QH 68 V55 2017eb

    The scientific achievements and forgotten legacy of a major Austrian research institute, from its founding in 1902 to its wartime destruction in 1945.

    The Biologische Versuchsanstalt was founded in Vienna in 1902 with the explicit goal to foster the quantification, mathematization, and theory formation of the biological sciences. Three biologists from affluent Viennese Jewish families--Hans Przibram, Wilhelm Figdor, and Leopold von Portheim-founded, financed, and nurtured the institute, overseeing its development into one of the most advanced biological research institutes of the time. And yet today its accomplishments are nearly forgotten. In 1938, the founders and other members were denied access to the institute by the Nazis and were forced into exile or deported to concentration camps. The building itself was destroyed by fire in April 1945. This book rescues the legacy of the "Vivarium" (as the Institute was often called), describing both its scientific achievements and its place in history.

    The book covers the Viennese sociocultural context at the time of the Vivarium's founding, and the scientific zeitgeist that shaped its investigations. It discusses the institute's departments and their research topics, and describes two examples that had scientific and international ramifications: the early work of Karl von Frisch, who in 1973 won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine; and the connection to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York.

    Contributors

    Heiner Fangerau, Johannes Feichtinger, Georg Gaugusch, Manfred D. Laubichler, Cheryl A. Logan, Gerd B. Müller, Tania Munz, Kärin Nickelsen, Christian Reiß, Kate E. Sohasky, Heiko Stoff, Klaus Taschwer


  • Patrons of Paleontology : How Government Support Shaped a Science / Jane P. Davidson
    QE 705 A1 D38 2017eb

    In the 19th and early 20th centuries, North American and European governments generously funded the discoveries of such famous paleontologists and geologists as Henry de la Beche, William Buckland, Richard Owen, Thomas Hawkins, Edward Drinker Cope, O. C. Marsh, and Charles W. Gilmore. In Patrons of Paleontology, Jane Davidson explores the motivation behind this rush to fund exploration, arguing that eagerness to discover strategic resources like coal deposits was further fueled by patrons who had a genuine passion for paleontology and the fascinating creatures that were being unearthed. These early decades of government support shaped the way the discipline grew, creating practices and enabling discoveries that continue to affect paleontology today.


  • Einstein's Pacifism and World War I / Virginia Iris Holmes
    QC 16 E5 H65 2017eb

  • Engineering the Environment : Phytotrons and the Quest for Climate Control in the Cold War / David P.D. Munns
    QK 715.5 M86 2017eb

  • African Women : Early History to the 21st Century / edited by Jill M. Bystydzienski and Sharon R. Bird
    Q 130 R46 2006eb

    African women's history is a topic as vast as the continent itself, embracing an array of societies in over fifty countries with different geographies, social customs, religions, and historical situations. In African Women: Early History to the 21st Century, Kathleen Sheldon masterfully delivers a comprehensive study of this expansive story from before the time of records to the present day. She provides rich background on descent systems and the roles of women in matrilineal and patrilineal systems. Sheldon's work profiles elite women, as well as those in leadership roles, traders and market women, religious women, slave women, women in resistance movements, and women in politics and development. The rich case studies and biographies in this thorough survey establish a grand narrative about women's roles in the history of Africa.


  • Strange Science : Investigating the Limits of Knowledge in the Victorian Age / Lara Karpenko and Shalyn Claggett, editors
    Q 127 G5 S77 2017eb
    The essays in Strange Science examine marginal, fringe, and unconventional forms of scientific inquiry, as well as their cultural representations, in the Victorian period. Although now relegated to the category of the pseudoscientific, fields like mesmerism and psychical research captured the imagination of the Victorian public. Conversely, many branches of science now viewed as uncontroversial, such as physics and botany, were often associated with unorthodox methods of inquiry. Whether ultimately incorporated into mainstream scientific thought or categorized by 21st century historians as pseudo- or even anti-scientific, these sciences generated conversation, enthusiasm, and controversy within Victorian society.
    To date, scholarship addressing Victorian pseudoscience tends to focus either on a particular popular science within its social context or on how mainstream scientific practice distinguished itself from more contested forms. Strange Science takes a different approach by placing a range of sciences in conversation with one another and examining the similar unconventional methods of inquiry adopted by both now-established scientific fields and their marginalized counterparts during the Victorian period. In doing so, Strange Science reveals the degree to which scientific discourse of this period was radically speculative, frequently attempting to challenge or extend the apparent boundaries of the natural world. This interdisciplinary collection will appeal to scholars in the fields of Victorian literature, cultural studies, the history of the body, and the history of science.


  • Drawing Physics : 2,600 Years of Discovery From Thales to Higgs / Don S. Lemons
    QC 7 L44 2017eb

    Drawings and short essays offer engaging and accessible explanations of key ideas in physics, from triangulation to relativity and beyond.

    Humans have been trying to understand the physical universe since antiquity. Aristotle had one vision (the realm of the celestial spheres is perfect), and Einstein another (all motion is relativistic). More often than not, these different understandings begin with a simple drawing, a pre-mathematical picture of reality. Such drawings are a humble but effective tool of the physicist's craft, part of the tradition of thinking, teaching, and learning passed down through the centuries. This book uses drawings to help explain fifty-one key ideas of physics accessibly and engagingly. Don Lemons, a professor of physics and author of several physics books, pairs short, elegantly written essays with simple drawings that together convey important concepts from the history of physical science.

    Lemons proceeds chronologically, beginning with Thales' discovery of triangulation, the Pythagorean monocord, and Archimedes' explanation of balance. He continues through Leonardo's description of "earthshine" (the ghostly glow between the horns of a crescent moon), Kepler's laws of planetary motion, and Newton's cradle (suspended steel balls demonstrating by their collisions that for every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction). Reaching the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Lemons explains the photoelectric effect, the hydrogen atom, general relativity, the global greenhouse effect, Higgs boson, and more. The essays place the science of the drawings in historical context--describing, for example, Galileo's conflict with the Roman Catholic Church over his teaching that the sun is the center of the universe, the link between the discovery of electrical phenomena and the romanticism of William Wordsworth, and the shadow cast by the Great War over Einstein's discovery of relativity.

    Readers of Drawing Physics with little background in mathematics or physics will say, "Now I see, and now I understand."


  • The Prometheus Bomb : The Manhattan Project and Government in the Dark / Neil J. Sullivan
    QC 773.3 U5 S86 2016eb
    During World War II, the lives of millions of Americans lay precariously in the hands of a few brilliant scientists who raced to develop the first weapon of mass destruction. Elected officials gave the scientists free rein in the Manhattan Project without understanding the complexities and dangers involved in splitting the atom.

    The Manhattan Project was the first example of a new type of choice for congressmen, presidents, and other government officials: life and death on a national scale. From that moment, our government began fashioning public policy for issues of scientific development, discoveries, and inventions that could secure or threaten our existence and our future. But those same men and women had no training in such fields, did not understand the ramifications of the research, and relied on incomplete information to form potentially life-changing decisions.

    Through the story of the Manhattan Project, Neil J. Sullivan asks by what criteria the people in charge at the time made such critical decisions. He also ponders how similar judgments are reached today with similar incomprehension from those at the top as our society dives down the potential rabbit hole of bioengineering, nanotechnology, and scientific developments yet to come.

  • Frederick Novy and the Development of Bacteriology in Medicine / Powel H. Kazanjian
    QR 74.8 K39 2017eb
    At the turn of the twentieth century, Frederick Novy was the leader among a new breed of full-time bacteriologists at American medical schools. Although historians have examined bacteriologic work done in American health department laboratories, there has been little examination of similar work completed within U.S. medical schools during this period.

    In Frederick Novy and the Development of Bacteriology in Medicine , medical historian, medical researcher, and clinician Powel H. Kazanjian uses Novy's archived letters, laboratory notebooks, lecture notes, and published works to examine medical research and educational activities at the University of Michigan and other key medical schools during a formative period in modern medical science.

  • Activist Biology : The National Museum, Politics, and Nation Building in Brazil / Regina Horta Duarte ; translated by Diane Grosklaus Whitty
    QH 305.2 B6 D8213 2016eb

  • Science Museums in Transition : Cultures of Display in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America / edited by Carin Berkowitz and Bernard Lightman
    Q 105 A1 S356 2017eb

  • Field Life : Science in the American West during the Railroad Era / Jeremy Vetter
    Q 127 U6 V484 2016eb

  • Body Modern : Fritz Kahn, Scientific Illustration, and the Homuncular Subject / Michael Sappol
    Q 143 K24 S27 2017eb

    A poster first printed in Germany in 1926 depicts the human body as a factory populated by tiny workers doing industrial tasks. Devised by Fritz Kahn (1888-1968), a German-Jewish physician and popular science writer, "Der Mensch als Industriepalast" (or "Man as Industrial Palace") achieved international fame and was reprinted, in various languages and versions, all over the world. It was a new kind of image--an illustration that was conceptual and scientific, a visual explanation of how things work--and Kahn built a career of this new genre. In collaboration with a stable of artists (only some of whom were credited), Kahn created thousands of images that were metaphorical, allusive, and self-consciously modern, using an eclectic grab-bag of schools and styles: Dada, Art Deco, photomontage, Art Nouveau, Bauhaus functionalism, and commercial illustration. 

    In Body Modern , Michael Sappol offers the first in-depth critical study of Fritz Kahn and his visual rhetoric. Kahn was an impresario of the modern who catered to readers who were hungry for products and concepts that could help them acquire and perform an overdetermined "modern" identity. He and his artists created playful new visual tropes and genres that used striking metaphors to scientifically explain the "life of Man." This rich and largely obscure corpus of images was a technology of the self that naturalized the modern and its technologies by situating them inside the human body.

    The scope of Kahn's project was vast--entirely new kinds of visual explanation--and so was his influence. Today, his legacy can be seen in textbooks, magazines, posters, public health pamphlets, educational websites, and Hollywood movies. But, Sappol concludes, Kahn's illustrations also pose profound and unsettling epistemological questions about the construction and performance of the self. Lavishly illustrated with more than 100 images, Body Modern imaginatively explores the relationship between conceptual image, image production, and embodied experience.


  • Wetenschap als roeping : Een geschiedenis van de Leuvense faculteit voor wetenschappen / Geert Vanpaemel
    Q 183.4 B43 U555 2017eb

  • Reading Galileo : Scribal Technologies and the Two New Sciences / Renee Raphael
    QB 36 G2 R2155 2017eb

    In 1638, Galileo was over seventy years old, blind, and confined to house arrest outside of Florence. With the help of friends and family, he managed to complete and smuggle to the Netherlands a manuscript that became his final published work, Two New Sciences . Treating diverse subjects that became the foundations of mechanical engineering and physics, this book is often depicted as the definitive expression of Galileo's purportedly modern scientific agenda. In Reading Galileo , Renée Raphael offers a new interpretation of Two New Sciences which argues instead that the work embodied no such coherent canonical vision. Raphael alleges that it was written--and originally read--as the eclectic product of the types of discursive textual analysis and meandering descriptive practices Galileo professed to reject in favor of more qualitative scholarship.

    Focusing on annotations period readers left in the margins of extant copies and on the notes and teaching materials of seventeenth-century university professors whose lessons were influenced by Galileo's text, Raphael explores the ways in which a range of early-modern readers, from ordinary natural philosophers to well-known savants, responded to Galileo. She highlights the contrast between the practices of Galileo's actual readers, who followed more traditional, "bookish" scholarly methods, and their image, constructed by Galileo and later historians, as "modern" mathematical experimenters.

    Two New Sciences has not previously been the subject of such rigorous attention and analysis. Reading Galileo considerably changes our understanding of Galileo's important work while offering a well-executed case study in the reception of an early-modern scientific classic. This important text will be of interest to a wide range of historians--of science, of scholarly practices and the book, and of early-modern intellectual and cultural history.


  • The Digital Mind : How Science is Redefining Humanity / Arlindo Oliveira
    Q 335 O45 2017eb

    How developments in science and technology may enable the emergence of purely digital minds--intelligent machines equal to or greater in power than the human brain.

    What do computers, cells, and brains have in common? Computers are electronic devices designed by humans; cells are biological entities crafted by evolution; brains are the containers and creators of our minds. But all are, in one way or another, information-processing devices. The power of the human brain is, so far, unequaled by any existing machine or known living being. Over eons of evolution, the brain has enabled us to develop tools and technology to make our lives easier. Our brains have even allowed us to develop computers that are almost as powerful as the human brain itself. In this book, Arlindo Oliveira describes how advances in science and technology could enable us to create digital minds.

    Exponential growth is a pattern built deep into the scheme of life, but technological change now promises to outstrip even evolutionary change. Oliveira describes technological and scientific advances that range from the discovery of laws that control the behavior of the electromagnetic fields to the development of computers. He calls natural selection the ultimate algorithm, discusses genetics and the evolution of the central nervous system, and describes the role that computer imaging has played in understanding and modeling the brain. Having considered the behavior of the unique system that creates a mind, he turns to an unavoidable question: Is the human brain the only system that can host a mind? If digital minds come into existence--and, Oliveira says, it is difficult to argue that they will not--what are the social, legal, and ethical implications? Will digital minds be our partners, or our rivals?


  • The Lives of Dillon Ripley : Natural Scientist, Wartime Spy, and Pioneering Leader of the Smithsonian Institution / Roger D. Stone
    Q 11 S8 S765 2017eb
    A Yale-educated Renaissance man, S. Dillon Ripley was a "courtly, determined, hugely ambitious, energetic, funny, and colorful ornithologist, conservationist, and cultural standard-bearer" who led the Smithsonian Institution for twenty years, during its greatest period of growth. During his watch, from 1964 to 1984, the SI added eight new museums and seven new research centers and began publication of the Smithsonian magazine. It was Ripley's vision that transformed "the nation's attic" from a dusty archive to a vibrant educational and cultural institution, just as he had transformed Yale's Peabody museum before it.

    Prior to his career at the SI, and running parallel with it for the rest of his life, was Ripley's work as an ornithologist, begun in New Guinea in the 1930s, continued through his PhD from Harvard in 1943, and culminating in his landmark thirty-year project documenting the bird life of India. His lifelong passion for ornithology led him to positions of leadership in worldwide nature conservation.

    In the midst of these endeavors he was recruited in 1944 to the Office of Strategic Services, a Yalie club at the outset that became the forerunner of the modern CIA. Posted to Ceylon, he recruited and ran agents who reported from and infiltrated Japanese-held Southeast Asia.

    Roger D. Stone worked with Ripley on the board of the World Wildlife Fund. He has access to the Ripley family's archives and photos, as well as to the voluminous archives at the Smithsonian and the National Archives, and to over forty hours of transcribed interviews, conducted with Ripley at the Smithsonian.

  • The Spirit and the Sky : Lakota Visions of the Cosmos / Mark Hollabaugh
    QB 32 H6845 2017eb
    The interest of nineteenth-century Lakotas in the Sun, the Moon, and the stars was an essential part of their never-ending quest to understand their world. The Spirit and the Sky presents a survey of the ethnoastronomy of the nineteenth-century Lakotas and relates Lakota astronomy to their cultural practices and beliefs. The center of Lakota belief is the incomprehensible, extraordinary, and sacred nature of the world in which they live. The earth beneath and the stars above constitute their holistic world.

    Mark Hollabaugh offers a detailed analysis of aspects of Lakota culture that have a bearing on Lakota astronomy, including telling time, their names for the stars and constellations as they appeared from the Great Plains, and the phenomena of meteor showers, eclipses, and the aurora borealis. Hollabaugh's explanation of the cause of the aurora that occurred at the death of Black Elk in 1950 is a new contribution to ethnoastronomy.

  • Minoan Earthquakes : Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity / edited by Simon Jusseret and Manuel Sintubin
    QE 539.2 P34M563 2017eb

  • Equations and inequalities : elementary problems and theorems in algebra and number theory / Jiří Herman, Radan Kučera, Jaromír Šimša ; translated by Karl Dilcher
    QA 218 H4713 2000
    A look at solving problems in three areas of classical elementary mathematics: equations and systems of equations of various kinds, algebraic inequalities, and elementary number theory, in particular divisibility and diophantine equations. In each topic, brief theoretical discussions are followed by carefully worked out examples of increasing difficulty, and by exercises which range from routine to rather more challenging problems. While it emphasizes some methods that are not usually covered in beginning university courses, the book nevertheless teaches techniques and skills which are useful beyond the specific topics covered here. With approximately 330 examples and 760 exercises.

  • The old and new : a narrative on the history of the Society for Experimental Mechanics / Cesar A. Sciammarella ; edited by Kristin B. Zimmerman
    QC 120 S366 2018eb

    The field of Experimental Mechanics has evolved substantially over the past 100 years. In the early years, the field was primarily comprised of applied physicists, civil engineers, railroad engineers, and mechanical engineers. The field defined itself by those who invented, developed, and refined experimental tools and techniques, based on the latest technologies available, to better understand the fundamental mechanics of materials and structures used to design many aspects of our everyday life. What the early experimental mechanician measured, observed, and evaluated were things like stress, strain, fracture, and fatigue, to name a few, which remain fundamental to the field today.

    This book guides you through a chronology of the formation of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, and its ensuing evolution. The Society was founded in 1935 by a very small group of individuals that understood the value of creating a common forum for people working in the field of Applied Mechanics of Solids, where extensive theoretical developments needed the input of experimental validation. A community of individuals who--through research, applications, sharp discussion of ideas--could fulfill the needs of a nation rapidly evolving in the technological field. The founders defined, influenced, and grew the field of what we now call Experimental Mechanics. Written as a narrative, the author describes, based on input from numerous individuals and personal experiences, the evolution of the New England Photoelasticity Conference to what we know today as the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM). The narrative is the author's perspective that invites members of the Society to contribute to the story by adding names of individuals, institutions, and technologies that have defined the Society over the past 75 years.

    Many of the key individuals who greatly influenced the advancement of the field of Experimental Mechanics are mentioned. These individuals are, in many ways, the founders of the field who have written textbooks, brought their teaching leadership and experiences to the classroom, worked on the Apollo project, and invented testing, evaluation, and measurement equipment that have shaped the fields of engineering. SEM's international membership is highly represented by those in academia, as you will read, although there has always been a powerful balance and contribution from industry and research organizations across the globe.

    The role of the experimental mechanician is defined, in many ways, through the individual legacies shared in the following pages....legacies that define the past and create the foundation for what is now and what is to come.


  • The old and new : a narrative on the history of the Society for Experimental Mechanics / Cesar A. Sciammarella ; edited by Kristin B. Zimmerman
    QC 120 S366 2018eb

    The field of Experimental Mechanics has evolved substantially over the past 100 years. In the early years, the field was primarily comprised of applied physicists, civil engineers, railroad engineers, and mechanical engineers. The field defined itself by those who invented, developed, and refined experimental tools and techniques, based on the latest technologies available, to better understand the fundamental mechanics of materials and structures used to design many aspects of our everyday life. What the early experimental mechanician measured, observed, and evaluated were things like stress, strain, fracture, and fatigue, to name a few, which remain fundamental to the field today.

    This book guides you through a chronology of the formation of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, and its ensuing evolution. The Society was founded in 1935 by a very small group of individuals that understood the value of creating a common forum for people working in the field of Applied Mechanics of Solids, where extensive theoretical developments needed the input of experimental validation. A community of individuals who--through research, applications, sharp discussion of ideas--could fulfill the needs of a nation rapidly evolving in the technological field. The founders defined, influenced, and grew the field of what we now call Experimental Mechanics. Written as a narrative, the author describes, based on input from numerous individuals and personal experiences, the evolution of the New England Photoelasticity Conference to what we know today as the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM). The narrative is the author's perspective that invites members of the Society to contribute to the story by adding names of individuals, institutions, and technologies that have defined the Society over the past 75 years.

    Many of the key individuals who greatly influenced the advancement of the field of Experimental Mechanics are mentioned. These individuals are, in many ways, the founders of the field who have written textbooks, brought their teaching leadership and experiences to the classroom, worked on the Apollo project, and invented testing, evaluation, and measurement equipment that have shaped the fields of engineering. SEM's international membership is highly represented by those in academia, as you will read, although there has always been a powerful balance and contribution from industry and research organizations across the globe.

    The role of the experimental mechanician is defined, in many ways, through the individual legacies shared in the following pages....legacies that define the past and create the foundation for what is now and what is to come.


  • The geologic history of the moon / by Don E. Wilhelms with sections by John McCauley and Newell J. Trask
    QE 75 P9 no.1348

  • Applying the classification of finite simple groups : a user's guide / Stephen D. Smith
    QA 177 S645 2018
    Classification of Finite Simple Groups (CFSG) is a major project involving work by hundreds of researchers. The work was largely completed by about 1983, although final publication of the ``quasithin'' part was delayed until 2004. Since the 1980s, CFSG has had a huge influence on work in finite group theory and in many adjacent fields of mathematics. This book attempts to survey and sample a number of such topics from the very large and increasingly active research area of applications of CFSG. The book is based on the author's lectures at the September 2015 Venice Summer School on Finite Groups. With about 50 exercises from original lectures, it can serve as a second-year graduate course for students who have had first-year graduate algebra. It may be of particular interest to students looking for a dissertation topic around group theory. It can also be useful as an introduction and basic reference; in addition, it indicates fuller citations to the appropriate literature for readers who wish to go on to more detailed sources.

  • Cloud computing for optimization : foundations, applications, and challenges / Bhabani Shankar Prasad Mishra, Himansu Das, Satchidananda Dehuri, Alok Kumar Jagadev, editors
    QA76.585

  • Probabilistic theory of mean field games with applications. René Carmona, François Delarue
    QC174.85.M43

  • The mathematics of the uncertain : a tribute to Pedro Gil / Eduardo Gil, Eva Gil, Juan Gil, María Ángeles Gil, editors
    QA276

  • Analytic aspects of convexity / Gabriele Bianchi, Andrea Colesanti, Paolo Gronchi, editors
    QA639.5

  • Semiotics of animals in culture : zoosemiotics 2.0 / Gianfranco Marrone, Dario Mangano, editors
    QH331

  • Basic atomic interactions of accelerated heavy ions in matter : atomic interactions of heavy ions / Inga Tolstikhina, Makoto Imai, Nicolas Winckler, Viacheslav Shevelko
    QC702.7.H42

  • Engineering and application of pluripotent stem cells / Ulrich Martin, Robert Zweigerdt, Ina Gruh, editors ; with contributions by P.W. Andrews [and more]
    QH588.S83

  • Probiotics and prebiotics in animal health and food safety Diana Di Gioia, Bruno Biavati, editors
    QR171.G29

  • Nonlinear dynamical systems with self-excited and hidden attractors Viet-Thanh Pham... [et al.], editors
    QA808

  • Extreme states of matter in strong interaction physics an introduction / Helmut Satz
    QC318.T47

  • Practical Python AI projects mathematical models of optimization problems with Google OR-tools
    QA76.73.P98

  • Multiple messengers and challenges in astroparticle physics
    QB461

  • Advances in soil microbiology : recent trends and future prospects. Tapan Kumar Adhya, Banwari Lal, Balaram Mohapatra, Dhiraj Paul, Subhasis Das, editors
    QR111

  • Internet multimedia computing and service : 9th International Conference, ICIMCS 2017, Qingdao, China, August 23-25, 2017, Revised selected papers / Benoit Huet, Liqiang Nie, Richang Hong (eds.)
    QA76.575

  • Requirements engineering : foundation for software quality : 24th International Working Conference, REFSQ 2018, Utrecht, The Netherlands, March 19-22, 2018, Proceedings / Erik Kamsties, Jennifer Horkoff, Fabiano Dalpiaz (eds.)
    QA76.758 .R44 2018eb

  • Automatic syntactic analysis based on selectional preferences / Alexander Gelbukh, Hiram Calvo
    QA76.9.N38

  • Geometrical themes inspired by the N-body problem Luis Hernández-Lamoneda, Haydeé Herrera, Rafael Herrera, editors
    QC174.17.P7

  • The life, science and times of Lev Vasilevich Shubnokov : pioneer of soviet cryogenics
    QC16.S4975

  • Classical mechanics / Matthew J. Benacquista, Joseph D. Romano
    QA805 .B46 2018eb

  • Quantitative models for microscopic to macroscopic biological macromolecules and tissues / Luis Olivares-Quiroz, Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio, editors
    QP801.P64 Q36 2018eb

  • Reversibility and universality essays presented to Kenichi Morita on the occasion of his 70th birthday / Andrew Adamatzky, editor
    QA76.9.R48

  • Accelerator Programming Using Directives 4th International Workshop, WACCPD 2017, Held in Conjunction with the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, SC 2017, Denver, CO, USA, November 13, 2017, Proceedings / edited by Sunita Chandrasekaran, Guido Juckeland
    QA76.76.C65

  • Solar Particle Radiation Storms Forecasting and Analysis The HESPERIA HORIZON 2020 Project and Beyond / edited by Olga E. Malandraki, Norma B. Crosby
    QB526.S65

  • Information Security and Cryptology 13th International Conference, Inscrypt 2017, Xi'an, China, November 3–5, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / edited by Xiaofeng Chen, Dongdai Lin, Moti Yung
    QA76.9.A25

  • Man-Machine Speech Communication 14th National Conference, NCMMSC 2017, Lianyungang, China, October 11–13, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / edited by Jianhua Tao, Thomas Fang Zheng, Changchun Bao, Dong Wang, Ya Li
    Q337.5

  • Euro-Par 2017: Parallel Processing Workshops Euro-Par 2017 International Workshops, Santiago de Compostela, Spain, August 28-29, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / edited by Dora B. Heras, Luc Bougé
    QA76.9.E94

  • Introduction to Deep Learning From Logical Calculus to Artificial Intelligence / by Sandro Skansi
    QA76.9.D343

  • New Trends in E-service and Smart Computing edited by Tokuro Matsuo, Tsunenori Mine, Sachio Hirokawa
    Q342

  • A Second Course in Topos Quantum Theory by Cecilia Flori
    QC173.96

  • Tree Pollination Under Global Climate Change by Fernando Ramírez, Jose Kallarackal
    QK474.8

  • Semantic Keyword-Based Search on Structured Data Sources Third International KEYSTONE Conference, IKC 2017, Gdańsk, Poland, September 11-12, 2017, Revised Selected Papers and COST Action IC1302 Reports / edited by Julian Szymański, Yannis Velegrakis
    QA75.5

  • Zoological Collections of Germany The Animal Kingdom in its Amazing Plenty at Museums and Universities / edited by Lothar A. Beck
    QL351

  • Magnetohydrodynamics and Fluid Dynamics: Action Principles and Conservation Laws by Gary Webb
    QA930

  • Exploring Intelligent Decision Support Systems Current State and New Trends / edited by Rafael Valencia-García, Mario Andrés Paredes-Valverde, María del Pilar Salas-Zárate, Giner Alor-Hernández
    Q342

  • Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience Proceedings of the 3rd International Scientific Conference on Brain-Computer Interfaces, BCI 2018, March 13-14, Opole, Poland / edited by Wojciech P. Hunek, Szczepan Paszkiel
    Q342

  • Parametric Interval Algebraic Systems by Iwona Skalna
    Q342

  • Lectures on Runtime Verification Introductory and Advanced Topics / edited by Ezio Bartocci, Yliès Falcone
    QA76.758

  • Computer Science and Engineering—Theory and Applications edited by Mauricio A. Sanchez, Leocundo Aguilar, Manuel Castañón-Puga, Antonio Rodríguez-Díaz
    Q342

  • Proteomics in Domestic Animals: from Farm to Systems Biology edited by Andre Martinho de Almeida, David Eckersall, Ingrid Miller
    QD431

  • Digital TV and Wireless Multimedia Communication 14th International Forum, IFTC 2017, Shanghai, China, November 8-9, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / edited by Guangtao Zhai, Jun Zhou, Xiaokang Yang
    QA76.575

  • Advanced Hybrid Information Processing First International Conference, ADHIP 2017, Harbin, China, July 17–18, 2017, Proceedings / edited by Guanglu Sun, Shuai Liu
    Q334

  • Emotion in Video Game Soundtracking edited by Duncan Williams, Newton Lee
    QA76.9.U83

  • Further Adventures of the Celestial Sleuth Using Astronomy to Solve More Mysteries in Art, History, and Literature / by Donald W. Olson
    QB1-991

  • Fractional-order Modeling of Nuclear Reactor: From Subdiffusive Neutron Transport to Control-oriented Models A Systematic Approach / by Vishwesh Vyawahare, Paluri S. V. Nataraj
    Q342

  • Type-2 Fuzzy Logic and Systems Dedicated to Professor Jerry Mendel for his Pioneering Contribution / edited by Robert John, Hani Hagras, Oscar Castillo
    Q342

  • Grid Optimal Integration of Electric Vehicles: Examples with Matlab Implementation by Andrés Ovalle, Ahmad Hably, Seddik Bacha
    Q342

  • Algorithms and Discrete Applied Mathematics 4th International Conference, CALDAM 2018, Guwahati, India, February 15-17, 2018, Proceedings / edited by B.S. Panda, Partha P. Goswami
    QA76.9.A43

  • Elements of Classical and Quantum Physics by Michele Cini
    QC173.96
page last updated on: Tuesday 22 May 2018
Back to top Back to top