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Building Engineering - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range TH (Building Engineering) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Seismic Evaluation and Retrofit of Existing Buildings : ASCE/SEI, 41-17
    TH 1095 A527 2017eb

    Prepared by the Seismic Retrofit of Existing Buildings Standards Committee of the Codes and Standards Activities Division of the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE

    Seismic Evaluation and Retrofit of Existing Buildings, Standard ASCE/SEI 41-17, describes deficiency-based and systematic procedures that use performance-based principles to evaluate and retrofit existing buildings to withstand the effects of earthquakes. The standard presents a three-tiered process for seismic evaluation according to a range of building performance levels by connecting targeted structural performance and the performance of nonstructural components with seismic hazard levels. The deficiency-based procedures allow evaluation and retrofit efforts to focus on specific potential deficiencies deemed to be of concern for a specified set of building types and heights. The systematic procedure, applicable to any building, sets forth a methodology to evaluate the entire building in a rigorous manner.

    This standard establishes analysis procedures and acceptance criteria, and specifies requirements for foundations and geologic site hazards; components made of steel, concrete, masonry, wood, and cold-formed steel; architectural, mechanical, and electrical components and systems; and seismic isolation and energy dissipation systems. Checklists are provided for a variety of building types and seismicity levels in support of the Tier 1 screening process. This new edition, which updates and replaces previous editions of ASCE 41, introduces revisions to the basic performance objectives for existing buildings and to the evaluation of force-controlled actions. It revises the nonlinear dynamic procedure and changes provisions for steel and concrete columns, as well provisions as for unreinforced masonry.

    Standard ASCE/SEI 41-17 is a primary reference for structural engineers addressing the seismic resilience of existing buildings and for building code officials reviewing such work; it also will be of interest to architects, construction managers, academic researchers, and building owners.


  • Minimum design loads and associated criteria for buildings and other structures : ASCE/SEI 7-16
    TH 851 M56 2017eb

    Prepared by the Committee on Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures of the Codes and Standards Activities Division of the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE

    Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures , ASCE/SEI 7-16, provides the most up-to-date and coordinated loading standard for general structural design. ASCE 7-16 describes the means for determining design loads including dead, live, soil, flood, tsunami, snow, rain, atmospheric ice, earthquake, wind, and fire, as well as how to assess load combinations. The 2016 edition of ASCE 7, which supersedes ASCE/SEI 7-10, coordinates with the most recent material standards, including the ACI, AISC, AISI, AWC, and TMS standards. Significant changes in ASCE 7-16 include the following:

    new seismic maps reflecting the updated National Seismic Hazard Maps; new wind speed maps, including new Hawaii maps, that result in reduced wind speeds for much of the United States, clarified special wind study zones, and separate Risk Category IV from Category III; new snow load maps incorporating regional snow data for areas that previously required site-specific case study zones; updated rain duration provisions that align design requirements with International Plumbing Code provisions for drainage; entirely new chapter covering tsunami design provisions, which are important to Alaska, Hawaii, California, Oregon, and Washington; and new appendix provisions for fire design.

    Standard provisions are accompanied by a detailed commentary with explanatory and supplementary information developed to assist users of the standard, including design practitioners, building code committees, and regulatory authorities.

    Standard ASCE/SEI 7 is an integral part of building codes in the United States and is adopted by reference into the International Building Code, the International Existing Building Code, the International Residential Code, and the NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code. Structural engineers, architects, and those engaged in preparing and administering local building codes will find the structural load requirements essential to their practice.


  • Schedule delay analysis
    TH 438.4 A44 2017eb

    Prepared by the Schedule Delay Analysis Standard Committee of the Construction Institute of ASCE

    Schedule Delay Analysis, Standard ANSI/ASCE/CI 67-17, presents guiding principles that can be used on construction projects to determine the impact of delays. Critical path method (CPM) schedules can be of evidential value to demonstrate causation and liability and to apportion delays when they occur on a project. CPM schedules will influence the quantification of delay and, ultimately, whether a party was damaged by a delay.

    This standard provides 35 guidelines that allow for segmentation of responsibility for delays to intermediary milestones and project completion dates. The guidelines enable the calculation of delay damages or liquidated damages by using CPM schedule techniques and preparing a schedule delay analysis. Each guideline is accompanied by commentary that explains the reasoning behind and application of that principle. Topics include scope and definitions; critical path, float, and early completion; chronology of delay, concurrent delay, and responsibility for delay; changing schedules after the fact, and acceleration.

    Standard ASCE 67-17 reflects the best engineering principles associated with schedule delay analysis, as well as the standard of practice in the U.S. construction industry. It is an essential reference for construction engineers, project managers, owners, and contracting agents.


  • Minimum design loads for buildings and other structures / American Society of Civil Engineers
    TH 851 M56 1990eb
    Gives requirements for dead, live, soil, wind, snow, rain and earthquake loads, and their combinations, which are suitable for inclusion in building codes and other design documents. This title is intended for architects, structural engineers, and those engaged in preparing and administering local building codes.

  • Air-supported structures / American Society of Civil Engineers
    TH 1099 A425 1997eb

    Prepared by the Air-Supported Structures Standards Committee of the Codes and Standards Activities Committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers

    Air-Supported Structures, Standard ASCE 17-96, provides minimum criteria for the design and operation of air-supported membrane structures that are either independent or attached to another structure. Requirements for materials, ancillary systems, and components are discussed, as is the need for testing by qualified testing agencies. This standard also explains the determination of specified loads in accordance with the applicable building code and the method of analysis used to determine the load effect on each element of the structure.

    Topics include: materials and physical properties; cables and reinforcing; membrane seams; mechanical joints; building systems; fire protection; entrances and exits; plumbing and electrical systems; control and monitoring systems; loads and load combinations; analysis and design requirements; member design strengths; erection and inflation; and operation, maintenance, emergency safety procedures, and systems.


  • Minimum design loads for buildings and other structures / American Society of Civil Engineers
    TH 851 M56 1993eb
    A set of standards (ASCE 7-93) replacing the previous one (ASCE 7-88) that features revised earthquake load criteria and associated load combinations for the design and construction of buildings and other structures subject to ground motion. Includes unchanged the requirements for dead, live, soil, wind, snow, and rain loads and their combinations. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

  • Minimum design loads for buildings and other structures / American Society of Civil Engineers
    TH 851 M56 1996eb
    Gives requirements for dead, live, soil, flood, wind, snow, rain, ice, and earthquake loads, and their combinations, that are suitable for inclusion in building codes and other documents. This work also contains a section on wind loads that includes the information in the field of wind load engineering.

  • Mechanical and electrical systems in architecture, engineering, and construction / Joseph B. Wujek, Frank R. Dagostino
    TH 6010 D33 2010
    The book provides comprehensive, easy-to-understand introductory coverage of mechanical and electrical systems in buildings. Elementary engineering concepts and step-by-step design principles are introduced in a straightforward manner and supported by over 320 illustrations and 500 photographs. It includes new chapters on emerging sustainability (green) technologies and building science. It presents material that can provide the future architect, architectural engineer, and architectural engineering technician with a basic working-level knowledge of principles and practices. This book is written specifically for those interested in building heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), plumbing and piping (water supply and sanitary drainage), storm drainage, illumination, electrical power distribution, building telecommunications, acoustics and acoustical control, vertical/horizontal transportation and conveying, fire protection and suppression, and building renewable energy and energy conservation systems.

  • Structural fire engineering / prepared by the Fire Protection Committee of the Structures Engineering Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers ; edited by Kevin J. LaMalva, P.E
    TH 1065 S77 2018eb

    Prepared by the Fire Protection Committee of the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE

    Structural Fire Engineeringprovides best practices for the field of performance-based structural fire engineering design. When structural systems are heated by fire, they experience thermal effects that are not contemplated by conventional structural engineering design. Traditionally, structural fire protection is prescribed for structures after they have been optimized for ambient design loads, such as gravity, wind, and seismic, among others. This century-old prescriptive framework endeavors to reduce the heating of individual structural components with the intent of mitigating the risk of structural failure under fire exposure. Accordingly, the vulnerability of buildings to structural failure from uncontrolled fire varies across jurisdictions-which have differing structural design requirements for ambient loads-and as a function of building system and component configuration. As an alternative approach, Standard ASCE 7-16 permits the application of performance-based structural fire design (also termed structural fire engineering design) to evaluate the performance of structural systems explicitly under fire exposure in a similar manner as other design loads are treated in structural engineering practice.

    Structural fire engineering design is the calculated design of a structure to withstand the thermal load effects of fire, which have the potential to alter the integrity of a structure, based on specific performance criteria. This manual, MOP 138, addresses the current practice, thermal and structural analysis methods, and available information to support structural fire engineering design. It covers

    * Background information on the protection of structures from fire and the effects of fire on different types of construction,

    * Key distinctions between standard fire resistance design and structural fire engineering design,

    * Guidance for evaluating thermal boundary conditions on a structure because of fire exposure and on conducting heat transfer calculations based on the material thermal properties,

    * Performance objectives for structures under fire exposure, and

    * Analysis techniques that can be used to quantify structural response to fire effects.

     

    This Manual of Practice is a valuable resource for structural engineers, architects, building officials, and academics concerned with performance-based design for structural fire safety.


  • Smart plant factory : the next generation indoor vertical farms / Toyoki Kozai, editor
    TH 7975 F2 S63 2018eb

  • Robotic building / Henriette Bier, editor
    TH900

  • Structural fire engineering / prepared by the Fire Protection Committee of the Structures Engineering Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers ; edited by Kevin J. LaMalva, P.E
    TH 1065 S77 2018

    Prepared by the Fire Protection Committee of the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE

    Structural Fire Engineeringprovides best practices for the field of performance-based structural fire engineering design. When structural systems are heated by fire, they experience thermal effects that are not contemplated by conventional structural engineering design. Traditionally, structural fire protection is prescribed for structures after they have been optimized for ambient design loads, such as gravity, wind, and seismic, among others. This century-old prescriptive framework endeavors to reduce the heating of individual structural components with the intent of mitigating the risk of structural failure under fire exposure. Accordingly, the vulnerability of buildings to structural failure from uncontrolled fire varies across jurisdictions-which have differing structural design requirements for ambient loads-and as a function of building system and component configuration. As an alternative approach, Standard ASCE 7-16 permits the application of performance-based structural fire design (also termed structural fire engineering design) to evaluate the performance of structural systems explicitly under fire exposure in a similar manner as other design loads are treated in structural engineering practice.

    Structural fire engineering design is the calculated design of a structure to withstand the thermal load effects of fire, which have the potential to alter the integrity of a structure, based on specific performance criteria. This manual, MOP 138, addresses the current practice, thermal and structural analysis methods, and available information to support structural fire engineering design. It covers

    * Background information on the protection of structures from fire and the effects of fire on different types of construction,

    * Key distinctions between standard fire resistance design and structural fire engineering design,

    * Guidance for evaluating thermal boundary conditions on a structure because of fire exposure and on conducting heat transfer calculations based on the material thermal properties,

    * Performance objectives for structures under fire exposure, and

    * Analysis techniques that can be used to quantify structural response to fire effects.

     

    This Manual of Practice is a valuable resource for structural engineers, architects, building officials, and academics concerned with performance-based design for structural fire safety.


  • Metric handbook : planning and design data / edited by Pamela Buxton
    TH 2031 M48 2018
    Significantly updated in reference to the latest construction standards and new building types Sustainable design integrated into chapters throughout Over half of the entire book has now been updated since 2015

    Over 100,000 copies sold to successive generations of architects and designers

    This book belongs in every design office.

    The Metric Handbook is the major handbook of planning and design data for architects and architecture students. Covering basic design data for all the major building types it is the ideal starting point for any project. For each building type, the book gives the basic design requirements and all the principal dimensional data, and succinct guidance on how to use the information and what regulations the designer needs to be aware of.

    As well as buildings, the Metric Handbook deals with broader aspects of design such as materials, acoustics and lighting, and general design data on human dimensions and space requirements. The Metric Handbook is the unique reference for solving everyday planning problems.


  • Ageing of infrastructure : a life-cycle approach / Frank Collins, Frédéric Blin
    TH 9039 C65 2019

    The book addresses the problem of ageing infrastructure and how ageing can reduce the service life below expected levels. The rate of ageing is affected by the type of construction material, environmental exposure, function of the infrastructure, and loading: each of these factors is considered in the assessment of ageing. How do international design codes address ageing? Predictive models of ageing behaviour are available and the different types (empirical, deterministic, and probabilistic) are discussed in a whole-of-life context. Life cycle plans, initiated at the design stage, can ensure that the design life is met, while optimising the management of the asset: reducing life cycle costs and reducing the environmental footprint due to less maintenance/remediation interventions and fewer unplanned stoppages and delays. Health monitoring of infrastructure can be conducted via implanted probes (wired or wireless) or by non-destructive testing that can routinely measure the durability, loading, and exposure environments at key locations around the facility. Routine monitoring can trigger preventative maintenance that can extend the life of the infrastructure and minimise unplanned and reactive remediation, while also providing ongoing data that can be utilised towards more durable future construction. Future infrastructure will need to be safe and durable, financially and environmentally sustainable over the lifecycle, thereby raising socio-economic wellbeing. The book concludes by discussing the key impacting factors that will need to be addressed. The author brings a strong academic and industry background to present a resource for academics and practitioners wishing to address the ageing of built infrastructure.

page last updated on: Saturday 23 February 2019
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