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Classical Languages and Linguistics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Classical Languages and Linguistics (PA) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 120 days.


  • Annotations on Galatians and Ephesians / translated, edited, and annotated by Riemer A. Faber
    PA 8502 E5 F33 2017

    Volume 58 in the Collected Works of Erasmus series contains, for the first time, the English translation of Erasmus' Annotations on Paul's Epistles to the Galatians and Ephesians.

    Erasmus' Annotations began as marginal comments in his own copy of the New Testament and were subsequently published in 1516 as a supplement to the Novum Instrumentum . His annotations were intended to justify his changes based on the Greek text. In each successive edition, published between 1516 and 1535, the Annotations grew in size and scope providing Erasmus with the opportunity to defend his translations in the face of growing criticism from orthodox Catholic theologians. This volume notes the editorial changes made in the five editions and also provides the reader with information about the patristic, medieval and contemporary sources consulted by Erasmus, and about the evolving relations with contemporary critics. The Annotations played a pivotal role in the development of sixteenth-century biblical exegesis and mark a significant stage in the evolution of humanist biblical scholarship.


  • Tales from Ovid / [translated by] Ted Hughes
    PA 6522 M2 H78 1997
    A powerful version of the Latin classic by England's late Poet Laureate, now in paperback.When it was published in 1997, Tales from Ovid was immediately recognized as a classic in its own right, as the best rering of Ovid in generations, and as a major book in Ted Hughes's oeuvre. The Metamorphoses of Ovid stands with the works of Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Milton as a classic of world poetry; Hughes translated twenty-four of its stories with great power and directness. The result is the liveliest twentieth-century version of the classic, at once a delight for the Latinist and an appealing introduction to Ovid for the general reader.

  • The pocket Oxford classical Greek dictionary / edited by James Morwood, John Taylor
    PA 445 E5 P63 2002
    This is an elementary level dictionary, aimed at beginners learning Classical Greek. It covers over 20,000 words and phrases, and gives translations for over 4,000 English words. In addition, it offers a table of irregular verbs, a list of numerals, and a guide to pronunciation, providing the ideal, authoritative introduction to Classical Greek.

  • Herodotus Book I / George A. Sheets
    PA 4002 A31 1993

    Bryn Mawr Commentaries provide clear, concise, accurate, and consistent support for students making the transition from introductory and intermediate texts to the direct experience of ancient Greek and Latin literature. They assume that the student will know the basics of grammar and vocabulary and then provide the specific grammatical and lexical notes that a student requires to begin the task of interpretation.

    Hackett Publishing Company is the exclusive distributor of the Bryn Mawr Commentaries in North America, the United Kingdom, and Europe.


  • Biblical epics in late antiquity and Anglo-Saxon England : divina in laude voluntas / Patrick McBrine
    PA 6053 M33 2017

    Biblical poetry, written between the fourth and eleventh centuries, is an eclectic body of literature that disseminated popular knowledge of the Bible across Europe. Composed mainly in Latin and subsequently in Old English, biblical versification has much to tell us about the interpretations, genre preferences, reading habits, and pedagogical aims of medieval Christian readers.

    Biblical Epics in Late Antiquity and Anglo-Saxon England provides an accessible introduction to biblical epic poetry. Patrick McBrine's erudite analysis of the writings of Juvencus, Cyprianus, Arator, Bede, Alcuin, and more reveals the development of a hybridized genre of writing that informed and delighted its Christian audiences to such an extent it was copied and promoted for the better part of a millennium. The volume contains many first-time readings and discussions of poems and passages which have long lain dormant and offers new evidence for the reception of the Bible in late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.


  • O tempora! O mores! : Cicero's Catilinarian orations : a student edition with historical essays / [edited by] Susan O. Shapiro
    PA 6279 C2 2005

    In 63 b.c., Lucius Sergius Catilina, a Roman aristocrat, formed a conspiracy to overthrow the Roman Republic. Cicero, who was consul that year, exposed the plot and documented his defeat of the conspiracy in his Orations against Catiline . The First Catilinarian Oration is well known and deservedly famous. Scholars are familiar with the other three speeches, but few students know them. This lapse is regrettable. The Third Oration is a fast-paced courtroom drama, and the Second and Fourth Orations provide critical information about this key event in Roman history. Susan O. Shapiro here makes all Cicero's Catilinarian Orations accessible to the intermediate Latin student.

    O Tempora! O Mores! is designed to fit a variety of pedagogical approaches. Professors can assign any of the Catilinarian Orations independently or assign excerpts from several of the speeches. Shapiro's historical essays bring a new dimension to Latin study, explaining the history and politics behind the texts. The essays are divided into short sections that can be assigned individually for class discussion. The volume is further amplified by a vocabulary, maps, a bibliography, and appendices.

     


  • Agricola / Tacitus ; edited by A.J. Woodman, Basil L. Gildersleeve Professor of Classics, University of Virginia ; with contributions from C.S. Kraus, Thomas A. Thacher Professor of Latin, Yale University
    PA 6706 A3 2014
    The first work of any great historian has always commanded attention, and Tacitus was ancient Rome's very greatest historian. His biography of his father-in-law, governor of Britain in the years AD 77-84, is a literary masterpiece: it combines penetrating political history with gripping military narrative and throughout poses the question (still very much alive today) of how one should live one's life under a tyranny. This is the first commentary in English on the Agricola for almost half a century: in keeping with the aims of the series, particular attention is paid to the understanding of Tacitus' Latin, but a whole range of generic, historical, textual and narrative topics is covered, and it will be suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students as well as scholars. Tacitus' Agricola remains a key text for anyone with an interest in Roman Britain as well as ancient biography.

  • A little Latin reader / Mary C. English, Georgia L. Irby
    PA 2095 E54 2018
    Covering an extensive variety of grammatical constructions, A Little Latin Reader, Second Edition, is an ideal supplement for undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Latin. It presents vivid, unadapted passages, each two to ten lines in length, drawn from the poetry and prose ofvarious Classical authors and from inscriptions. The selections are arranged according to the specific points of grammar and syntax that they demonstrate. By introducing unadapted Latin at the earliest stage of language instruction, A Little Latin Reader helps students transition more easily frombeginning and intermediate Latin textbooks to authentic Latin prose and poetry. The second edition includes eighty-one new passages and two new appendices - A Basic Guide to Paleography and The Roman Calendar.

  • The Cambridge companion to Xenophon / edited by Michael A. Flower
    PA 4497 C434 2017eb

  • Latin : a linguistic introduction / Renato Oniga ; edited and translated by Norma Schifano
    PA 2080 O5513 2014
    This textbook provides a detailed introduction to the study of Latin from the perspective of contemporary linguistics. It adopts some basic tenets of generative grammar in an in-depth analysis of the main phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Latin, and offers a step-by-stepguide to the universal principles and specific parameters which shape the language, along with comparative data from English and other languages.Latin: A Linguistic Introduction is a user-friendly and essential guide to the synchronic study of Latin as a natural language. The clarity of exposition and the richness of the examples cited provide a new approach to Latin as a topic of linguistic research: although the general structure of thebook is like that of a traditional Latin grammar, the discussion of grammatical rules is both more straightforward and more theoretically informed.This textbook is principally suitable for students of Latin and Romance linguistics at undergraduate level and above, but also for teachers and researchers interested in new ways of looking at the study of Latin. It differs from many other textbooks in the field by striking a valuable balancebetween the longstanding tradition of classical philology and the innovations of contemporary linguistics.

  • The birth of comedy : texts, documents, and art from Athenian comic competitions, 486-280 / edited by Jeffrey Rusten ; translated by Jeffrey Henderson [and others]
    PA 3161 B57 2011

    Aside from the well-known plays of Aristophanes, many of the comedies of ancient Greece are known only through fragments and references written in Greek. Now a group of distinguished scholars brings these nearly lost works to modern readers with lively English translations of the surviving texts.

    The Birth of Comedy brings together a wealth of information on the first three generations of Western comedy. The translations, presented in chronological order, are based on the universally praised scholarly edition in Greek, Poetae Comici Graeci , by R. Kassel and C. A. Austin. Additional chapters contain translations of texts relating to comedy at dramatic festivals, staging, audience, and ancient writers on comedy. The main text is supplemented by an introduction assessing the fragments' contributions to the political, social, and theatrical history of classical Athens and more than forty illustrations of comic scenes, costumes, and masks. A glossary of komoidoumenoi --the ancient word for "people mentioned in comedies"--provides background information on the most notorious comic victims. A full index includes not only authors, play titles, and persons mentioned, but themes from the whole Greek comic sphere (including politics, literature and philosophy, celebrities and social scandals, cookery and wine, sex, and wealth).

page last updated on: Monday 25 September 2017
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