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Classical Languages and Linguistics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Classical Languages and Linguistics (PA) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 120 days.


  • The Oxford grammar of classical Greek / James Morwood
    PA 258 M89 2001
    The Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek gives clear, concise and easily understood explanations of all the key points of Classical Greek grammar. With additional features such as a glossary of grammatical terms, a vocabulary list covering all the Greek words found in the main text along with study tips, this reference ensures that students have all the support they need to complement their language learning.

  • The poems / Propertius ; translated with notes by Guy Lee ; with an introduction by Oliver Lyne
    PA 6645 E5 L44 2009
    Of all the great classical love poets, Propertius (c. 50-10 BC) is surely one of those with most immediate appeal for readers today. His helpless infatuation for the sinister figure of his mistress Cynthia forms the main subject of his poetry and is analysed with a tormented but witty grandeurin all its changing moods, from ecstasy to suicidal despair.

  • Metamorphoses / Ovid ; translated by Stanley Lombardo ; introduction by W.R. Johnson
    PA 6522 M2 L66 2010
    Ovid's Metamorphoses gains its ideal twenty-first-century herald in Stanley Lombardo's bracing translation of a wellspring of Western art and literature that is too often treated, even by poets, as a mere vehicle for the scores of myths it recasts and transmits rather than as a unified work of art with epic-scale ambitions of its own. Such misconceptions are unlikely to survive a reading of Lombardo's rendering, which vividly mirrors the brutality, sadness, comedy, irony, tenderness, and eeriness of Ovid's vast world as well as the poem's effortless pacing. Under Lombardo's spell, neither Argus nor anyone else need fear nodding off. The translation is accompanied by an exhilarating Introduction by W. R. Johnson that unweaves and reweaves many of the poem's most important themes while showing how the poet achieves some of his most brilliant effects. An analytical table of contents, a catalog of transformations, and a glossary are also included.

  • The Iliad / Homer ; translated by Robert Fagles ; introduction and notes by Bernard Knox
    PA 4025 A2 F33 1998
    "Rage - Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles, murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses, hurling down to the House of Death so many sturdy souls..." Thus begins the stirring story of the Trojan War and the rage of Achilles that has gripped listeners and readers for 2,700 years. This timeless poem still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amidst devastation and destruction, as it moves inexorably to its wrenching, tragic conclusion. Renowned classicist Bernard Knox observes in his superb Introduction that although the violence of the Iliad is grim and relentless, it coexists with both images of civilised life and a poignant yearning for peace. Combining the skills of a poet and scholar, Robert Fagles brings the energy of contemporary language to this enduring heroic epic. He maintains the drive and metric music of Homer's poetry, and evokes the impact and nuance of the Iliad's mesmerising repeated phrases in what Peter Levi calls "an astonishing performance."

  • The shorter writings / Xenophon ; edited by Gregory A. McBrayer
    PA 4495 A4 M37 2018

    This book contains new, annotated, and literal yet accessible translations of Xenophon's eight shorter writings, accompanied by interpretive essays that reveal these works to be masterful achievements by a serious thinker of the first rank who raises important moral, political, and philosophical questions. Five of these shorter writings are unmistakably devoted to political matters. The Agesilaos is a eulogy of a Spartan king, and the Hiero, or the Skilled Tyrant recounts a searching dialogue between a poet and a tyrant. The Regime of the Lacedaemonians presents itself as a laudatory examination of what turns out to be an oligarchic regime of a certain type, while The Regime of the Athenians offers an unflattering picture of a democratic regime. Ways and Means, or On Revenues offers suggestions on how to improve the political economy of Athens' troubled democracy.

    The other three works included here-- The Skilled Cavalry Commander , On Horsemanship , and The One Skilled at Hunting with Dogs --treat skills deemed appropriate for soldiers and leaders, touching on matters of political importance, especially in regard to war. By bringing together Xenophon's shorter writings, this volume aims to help those interested in Xenophon to better understand the core of his thought, political as well as philosophical.

    Interpretive essays by: Wayne Ambler, Robert C. Bartlett, Amy L. Bonnette, Susan D. Collins, Michael Ehrmantraut, David Levy, Gregory A. McBrayer, Abram N. Shulsky.


  • Plutarch's Science of Natural Problems : A Study with Commentary on Quaestiones Naturales / by Michiel Meeusen
    PA 4383 M447 2017eb

  • Silenced Voices : The Poetics of Speech in Ovid / Bartolo Natoli
    PA 6537 N38 2017eb

  • History after Liberty : Tacitus on Tyrants, Sycophants, and Republicans / Thomas E. Strunk
    PA 6716 S77 2016eb

  • Ctesias' Persica and its Near Eastern context / Matt Waters
    PA 3948 C9 W38 2017eb

  • The Drunken Duchess of Vassar : Grace Harriet Macurdy, Pioneering Feminist Classical Scholar / Barbara McManus ; foreword by Judith P. Hallett and Christopher Stray
    PA 85 M278 M36 2017eb

  • The Socratic way of life : Xenophon's Memorabilia / Thomas L. Pangle
    PA 4494 M6 P36 2018
    The Socratic Way of Life is the first English-language book-length study of the philosopher Xenophon's masterwork. In it, Thomas L. Pangle shows that Xenophon depicts more authentically than does Plato the true teachings and way of life of the citizen philosopher Socrates, founder of political philosophy.
    In the first part of the book, Pangle analyzes Xenophon's defense of Socrates against the two charges of injustice upon which he was convicted by democratic Athens: impiety and corruption of the youth. In the second part, Pangle analyzes Xenophon's account of how Socrates's life as a whole was just, in the sense of helping through his teaching a wide range of people. Socrates taught by never ceasing to raise, and to progress in answering, the fundamental and enduring civic questions: what is pious and impious, noble and ignoble, just and unjust, genuine statesmanship and genuine citizenship. Inspired by Hegel's and Nietzsche's assessments of Xenophon as the true voice of Socrates, The Socratic Way of Life establishes the Memorabilia as the groundwork of all subsequent political philosophy.

  • Antigone undone : Juliette Binoche, Anne Carson, Ivo Van Hove, and the art of resistance / Will Aitken
    PA 4413 A7 A35 2018
    Antigone Undone offers an urgent and mesmerizing account of the creative and destructive power of great art. In 2015 Will Aitken journeyed to Luxembourg for the rehearsals and premiere of Anne Carson's translation of Sophokles' 5th-century BCE tragedy Antigone , starring Juliette Binoche and directed by theatrical sensation Ivo van Hove. In watching the play, he became awestruck with the plight of the young woman at the centre of the action. "Look at what these men are doing to me," An­tigone cries, expressing the predicament of the dispossessed throughout time. Transfixed by the strange and uncanny power of the play, he finds himself haunted by its protagonist, finally resulting in a suicidal breakdown. With a backstage view of the action, Aitken illuminates the creative process of Carson, Binoche, and Van Hove and offers a rare glimpse into collaborative genius in action. He also investi­gates the response to the play by Hegel, Virginia Woolf, Judith Butler, and others, who too, were moved by its timeless protest against injustice.

  • Orations / Aelius Aristides ; edited and translated by Michael Trapp
    PA 3612 A7 O7 2017

    Publius Aelius Aristides Theodorus was among the most celebrated authors of the Second Sophistic and an important figure in the transmission of Hellenism. Born to wealthy landowners in Mysia in 117, he studied in Athens and Pergamum before he fell chronically ill in the early 140s and retreated to Pergamum's healing shrine of Asclepius. By 147 Aristides was able to resume his public activities and pursue a successful oratorical career. Based at his family estate in Smyrna, he traveled between bouts of illness and produced speeches and lectures, declamations on historical themes, polemical works, prose hymns, and various essays, all of it displaying deep and creative familiarity with the classical literary heritage. He died between 180 and 185.

    This edition of Aristides, new to the Loeb Classical Library, offers fresh translations and texts based on the critical editions of Lenz-Behr ( Orations 1-16) and Keil ( Orations 17-53). Volume I contains the Panathenaic Oration , a historical appreciation of classical Athens and Aristides' most influential work, and A Reply to Plato , the first of three essays taking issue with the attack on orators and oratory delivered in Plato's Gorgias.

page last updated on: Monday 20 August 2018
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