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Photography - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range TR1 - TR1050 (Photography) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Photography and Other Media in the Nineteenth Century / edited by Nicoletta Leonardi and Simone Natale
    TR 15 P4795 2018eb

  • A Survey on 3D Cameras : Metrological Comparison of Time-of-Flight, Structured-Light and Active Stereoscopy Technologies / Silvio Giancola, Matteo Valenti, Remo Sala
    TR259

  • Carleton Watkins : making the West American / Tyler Green
    TR 140 W376 G74 2018
    Best Books of 2018-- The Guardian

    "[a] fascinating and indispensable book." --Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times

    Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias.

    Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were exhibited in New York for the first time in 1862, as news of the Union's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg was landing in newspapers and while the Matthew Brady Studio's horrific photographs of Antietam were on view. Watkins's work tied the West to Northern cultural traditions and played a key role in pledging the once-wavering West to Union.

    Motivated by Watkins's pictures, Congress would pass legislation, later signed by Abraham Lincoln, that preserved Yosemite as the prototypical "national park," the first such act of landscape preservation in the world. Carleton Watkins : Making the West American includes the first history of the birth of the national park concept since pioneering environmental historian Hans Huth's landmark 1948 "Yosemite: The Story of an Idea."

    Watkins's photographs helped shape America's idea of the West, and helped make the West a full participant in the nation. His pictures of California, Oregon, and Nevada, as well as modern-day Washington, Utah, and Arizona, not only introduced entire landscapes to America but were important to the development of American business, finance, agriculture, government policy, and science. Watkins's clients, customers, and friends were a veritable "who's who" of America's Gilded Age, and his connections with notable figures such as Collis P. Huntington, John and Jessie Benton Frémont, Eadweard Muybridge, Frederick Billings, John Muir, Albert Bierstadt, and Asa Gray reveal how the Gilded Age helped make today's America.

    Drawing on recent scholarship and fresh archival discoveries, Tyler Green reveals how an artist didn't just reflect his time, but acted as an agent of influence. This telling of Watkins's story will fascinate anyone interested in American history; the West; and how art and artists impacted the development of American ideas, industry, landscape, conservation, and politics.

  • The photography reader : history and theory / edited by Liz Wells
    TR 187 P56 2019

    Following on from its hugely successful first edition, The Photography Reader: History and Theory provides deeper insight into the critical discussions around photography ¿ its production, its uses and its effects. Presenting both the historical ideas and the continuing theoretical debates within photography and photographic study, this second edition contains essays by photographers including Edward Weston and L¿l¿ Moholy-Nagy, and key thinkers such as Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag.

    Along with its companion text ¿ The Photography Cultures Reader: Representation, Agency and Identity ¿ this is the most comprehensive introduction to photography and photographic criticism.

    This new edition features:

    ¿ Over 50 additional photographs

    ¿ New essays from photographers and academics

    ¿ Revised introductions, setting ideas and debates in their historical and theoretical context

    ¿ Sections on Art photography, Documentary and Photomedia.

    Includes essays by: Jan Baetens, Roland Barthes, Geoffrey Batchen, David Bate, Andr¿azin, Walter Benjamin, Lynn Berger, Matthew Biro, Osip Brik, Victor Burgin, Hubert Damisch, Edmundo Desnoes, Umberto Eco, Elizabeth Edwards, Steve Edwards, Andy Grundberg, Lisa Henderson, Estelle Jussim, Sarah Kember, Siegfried Kracauer, Rosalind Krauss, Martin Lister, Lev Manovich, Christian Metz, W. J. T. Mitchell, Tina Modotti, L¿l¿ Moholy-Nagy, Wright Morris, Darren Newbury, Daniel Palmer, Marjorie Perloff, Fred Ritchin, Martha Rosler, Steven Skopik, Abigail Solomon-Godeau, Susan Sontag, Lucy Soutter, John Szarkowski, John Tagg, Hilde Van Gelder, Ian Walker, Liz Wells, Edward Weston, Peter Wollen.


  • Old Paris and changing New York : photographs by Eugène Atget and Berenice Abbott / Kevin Moore
    TR 647 A827 2018
    An insightful new look at two renowned photographers, their interconnected legacies, and the vital documents of urban transformation that they created

    In this comprehensive study, Kevin Moore examines the relationship between Eugène Atget (1857-1927) and Berenice Abbott (1898-1991) and the nuances of their individual photographic projects. Abbott and Atget met in Man Ray's Paris studio in the early 1920s. Atget, then in his sixties, was obsessively recording the streets, gardens, and courtyards of the 19th-century city--old Paris--as modernization transformed it. Abbott acquired much of Atget's work after his death and was a tireless advocate for its value. She later relocated to New York and emulated Atget in her systematic documentation of that city, culminating in the publication of the project Changing New York .

    This engaging publication discusses how, during the 1930s and 1940s, Abbott paid further tribute to Atget by publishing and exhibiting his work and by printing hundreds of images from his negatives, using the gelatin silver process. Through Abbott's efforts, Atget became known to an audience of photographers and writers who found diverse inspiration in his photographs. Abbott herself is remembered as one of the most independent, determined, and respected photographers of the 20th century.
page last updated on: Saturday 23 February 2019
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