« Back | Print 
Concordia.ca   /   Library   /   About the library   /   News   /   Acquisitions

New books by subject

sort items by: 
 RSS

Photography - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range TR1 - TR1050 (Photography) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Jeannette Klute : A Photographic Pioneer / [text by] Therese Mulligan
    TR 721 J43 2017eb

  • Photography and American Coloniality : Eliot Elisofon in Africa, 1942–1972 / Raoul J. Granqvist
    TR 140 E4 G73 2017eb
    This book is the first to question both why and how the colonialist mythologies represented by the work of photographer Eliot Elisofon persist. It documents and discusses a heterogeneous practice of American coloniality of power as it explores Elisofon's career as war photographer-correspondent and staff photographer for LIFE , filmmaker, author, artist, and collector of "primitive art" and sculpture. It focuses on three areas: Elisofon's narcissism, voyeurism, and sexism; his involvement in the homogenizing of Western social orders and colonial legacies; and his enthused mission of "sending home" a mass of still-life photographs, annexed African artifacts, and assumed vintage knowledge. The book does not challenge his artistic merit or his fascinating personality; what it does question is his production and imagining of "difference." As the text travels from World War II to colonialism, postcolonialism, and the Cold War, from Casablanca to Leopoldville (Kinshasa), it proves to be a necessarily strenuous and provocative trip.

  • The Kinetoscope : A British History / Richard Brown and Barry Anthony ; with an additional chapter by Michael Harvey ; foreword by Charles Musser
    TR 885 B765 2017eb

    The 100th anniversary of cinema was marked throughout the world in 1995/6. Amongst the widespread celebrations it was largely overlooked that genuine motion pictures had been commercially shown 101 years earlier, and that the origins of the film industry lay in a peepshow device rather than the more familiar movie projector. Introduced in New York in April 1894 and in Paris and London later in the same year, Thomas Edison's electrically-driven Kinetoscope was the first practical method of film exhibition. Around a thousand of these state-of-the art machines were manufactured, featuring the first brief fiction films and the earliest newsreels. Techniques such as the close-up and stop-editing were introduced and the 35mm film employed became a universal standard. Edison was able to influence the development of the device in the United States, but he soon lost control of the British and European markets. Spearheaded by two entrepreneurial Greek merchants, George Georgiades and George Tragides, a large and often colorful group of showmen began to exploit the new invention. With Edison neglecting to obtain European patents, his agents fought a losing battle to stem an influx of 'bogus' Kinetoscopes onto the market. Leading the construction of replica Kinetoscopes was a young and ambitious electrical engineer who was to become central to the development of world cinema. In his business arrangements with the Greeks Robert William Paul operated close to the limits of legality, a risk-taking attitude that also led him to enter into a partnership with the notorious fraudster and self-publicist 'Viscount' Hinton. The rush to exploit the Kinetoscope faltered when Edison refused to supply films for pirate machines, but regained momentum when Paul and the American Birt Acres constructed their own camera, shooting the first British movies in March/April 1895. The turbulent and often unlikely events of 1894-5 were a crucial prelude to the birth of British cinema.

    The posit


  • My Life in Focus : A Photographer's Journey with Elizabeth Taylor and the Hollywood Jet Set / Gianni Bozzacchi with Joey Tayler
    TR 140 B67 A3 2017eb

    When Gianni Bozzacchi accepted an assignment as a photographer on the set of The Comedians (1967), he didn't know that his life was about to change forever. His ability to capture the beauty of candid moments drew the attention of the film's star, Elizabeth Taylor, and prompted her to hire him as her personal photographer. Not only did he go on to enjoy a jet-set life as her friend and confidant -- preserving unguarded moments between the violet-eyed beauty and Richard Burton as they traveled the world -- but Bozzacchi also became an internationally renowned photographer and shot some of the biggest celebrities of the 1960s and 1970s.

    In My Life in Focus , Bozzacchi traces his journey from humble beginnings to the sphere of the rich and famous. As a child, he cultivated his skills by working with his father -- a photographer for the Italian government. Following in his parent's footsteps was not something Bozzacchi had foreseen for his future; but his passion for taking pictures and his ability to put his subjects at ease enabled him to capture stunning images of some of the greatest stars of the twentieth century, including Audrey Hepburn, Steve McQueen, Raquel Welch, Mia Farrow, Clint Eastwood, and the royal family of Monaco.

    Beautifully illustrated with many of the photographer's most iconic images, this lively memoir reveals private moments in the Taylor-Burton love story and provides an invaluable behind-the-scenes look at the business of filmmaking and the perils of celebrity.


  • Making Believe : Screen Performance and Special Effects in Popular Cinema / Lisa Bode
    TR 858 B63 2017eb
    In the past twenty years, we have seen the rise of digital effects cinema in which the human performer is entangled with animation, collaged with other performers, or inserted into perilous or fantastic situations and scenery. Making Believe sheds new light on these developments by historicizing screen performance within the context of visual and special effects cinema and technological change in Hollywood filmmaking, through the silent, early sound, and current digital eras.

    Making Believe incorporates North American film reviews and editorials, actor and crew interviews, trade and fan magazine commentary, actor training manuals, and film production publicity materials to discuss the shifts in screen acting practice and philosophy around transfiguring makeup, doubles, motion capture, and acting to absent places or characters. Along the way it considers how performers and visual and special effects crew work together, and struggle with the industry, critics, and each other to define the aesthetic value of their work, in an industrial system of technological reproduction. Bode opens our eyes to the performing illusions we love and the tensions we experience in wanting to believe in spite of our knowledge that it is all make believe in the end.

  • Folk Masters : A Portrait of America / photographs by Tom Pich ; text by Barry Bergey
    TR 681 A7P53 2017eb

    Discover one hundred of the greatest folk artists practicing in the United States in Folk Masters: A Portrait of America. Over the past 25 years, photographer Tom Pich has traveled the country to the homes and studios of recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts' National Heritage Fellowship, the highest honor given to folk and traditional artists in the US. His portraits give us a glimpse into their art, their process, and their culture. While each image tells a story on its own, Barry Bergey, former Director of Folk and Traditional Arts at the National Endowment for the Arts, provides further insight into the lives of each featured artist as well as the remarkable stories behind each photograph. Folk Masters honors again the extraordinary women and men who simultaneously take the traditional arts to new heights while ensuring their continuation from generation to generation.


  • Inadvertent images : a history of photographic apparitions / Peter Geimer ; translated by Gerrit Jackson
    TR 183 G4513 2018

  • Field studies : walking through landscapes and archives / Chrystel Lebas ; texts by Nanda van den Berg, Bergit Arends, Marc Spencer, Liz Wells and Chrystel Lebas ; translation (nl-en), Ralph de Rijke
    TR 660 L43 2017

  • East of the Mississippi : nineteenth-century American landscape photography / Diane Waggoner with Russell Lord and Jennifer Raab
    TR 660 E29 2017
    An important reconsideration of landscape photography in 19th-century America, exploring crucial but neglected geographies, practitioners, and themes

    Although pictures of the West have dominated our perception of 19th-century American landscape photography, many photographers were working in the eastern half of the United States during that period. Their pictures, with the exception of Civil War images, have received relatively scant attention. Redressing this imbalance is East of the Mississippi, the first book to focus exclusively on the arresting eastern photographs that helped shape America's national identity. Celebrating natural wonders such as Niagara Falls and the White Mountains as well as capturing a cultural landscape fundamentally altered by industrialization, these works also documented the impact of war, promoted tourism, and played a role in an emerging environmentalism.

    Showcasing more than 180 photographs from 1839 to 1900 in a rich variety of media and formats--from daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, tintypes, cyanotypes, and albumen prints to stereo cards and photograph albums--this volume traces the evolution of eastern landscape photography and introduces the artists who explored this subject. Also considered are the dynamic ties with other media--for instance, between painters and photographers such as the Bierstadt and Moran brothers--and the distinctive development of landscape photography in America.

  • The black trilogy / Ralph Gibson ; text by Gilles Mora
    TR 647 G4929 2017

    "Ralph Gibson's Lustrum Press trilogy of the mid-1970s was immensely popular and influential. . . . Many of the pictures are amongst the most recognizable from the time . . . a surreal dreamscape, gently erotic, with a frisson of danger."
    --from The Photobook: A History, Volume 1 by Martin Parr and Gerry Badger

    An iconic American fine art photographer renowned for his highly surrealist vision, Ralph Gibson is a master of the photography book, which he considers an art form in its own right. In 1970, he founded Lustrum Press, a publishing house dedicated to photography books, and inaugurated it with three volumes--The Somnambulist (1970), Deja-Vu (1973), and Days at Sea (1974)--that showcased his own work in an uncompromisingly radical and demanding way. These books came to be known as Gibson's "Black Trilogy" and are now considered classics of the twentieth-century photobook genre.

    Making a clean break with the prior conventions of the photography book, "The Black Trilogy" created a new visual syntax--page layouts, the pairing of photographs face-to-face, graphic and thematic echoes--that provided a unique language for photographic communication. It soon became the model for a generation of young photographers, including Larry Clark, Danny Seymour, Mary Ellen Mark, Yves Guillot, and Arnaud Claass. "The Black Trilogy" volumes went out of print long ago and have become highly collectible. This reissue, with a new essay by the distinguished photographer and curator Gilles Mora, includes all three books in a single volume.


  • Masumi Hayashi : panoramic photo collages 1976-2006 / essay by Barbara Tannenbaum
    TR 685 H39 2017
    Best known for her technique of creating photo collages by suturing together images into a grid format, American photographer Masumi Hayashi (1945-2006) trained her lens on Rust Belt landscapes, EPA Superfund sites, Japanese American internment camps from World War Two and decaying prisons.

  • Eyes as big as plates / Karoline Hjorth, Riitta Ikonen
    TR 681 A35 H56 2017

    Eyes as Big as Plates is an ongoing collaborative photography and sculpture project by Norwegian-Finnish artist duo Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen (both born 1980).

    Initially a play on characters from Nordic folklore, the series has evolved into a search for the human connection to nature. Hjorth & Ikonen work together throughout the process with their complementary skills (Karoline is the photographer in the duo, while Riitta works mainly with the creation of the wearable sculptures). Since 2011 the duo has collaborated with retired farmers, fishermen, zoologists, plumbers, opera singers, housewives, artists and academics. Each character inhabits the landscape in a wearable sculpture made from natural materials.

    The book features portraits, field notes, essays and behind-the-scenes stories from many of the project's 60 shoots. With international press coverage in the Huffington Post , the BBC, TIME LightBox , Life and elsewhere, plus a highly successful Kickstarter campaign attracting a large American audience, the series has developed into a project with universal appeal.


  • To be thirteen / Betsy Schneider
    TR 680 S3 2017

    In 2011, Arizona-based photographer Betsy Schneider, herself the mother of a 13-year-old daughter, embarked on a project to explore the experience of being 13.

    Traveling around the United States, the Guggenheim grant recipient spent 2012 chronicling 250 13 year olds, creating still portraits and video documentation of each. The resulting body of work creates a rich collective portrait of a group of Americans whose lives began at the turn of the millennium and who are coming of age now.

    To Be Thirteen depicts all 250 portraits with brief quotations from the extended video interviews and an interview by Center for Creative Photography Chief Curator Rebecca Senf with Schneider, unpacking details about the artist's process, insights about the project and how it changed her, as well as longer excerpts from the subjects. This publication captures and conveys the experience of meeting with the artist and looking through a stack of prints with her, and will complement an exhibition of the project debuting at the Phoenix Art Museum in the spring of 2018.


  • The ethics of seeing : photography and twentieth-century German history / edited by Jennifer Evans, Paul Betts, and Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
    TR 73 E84 2018

    Throughout Germany's tumultuous twentieth century, photography was an indispensable form of documentation. Whether acting as artists, witnesses, or reformers, both professional and amateur photographers chronicled social worlds through successive periods of radical upheaval. The Ethics of Seeing brings together an international group of scholars to explore the complex relationship between the visual and the historic in German history. Emphasizing the transformation of the visual arena and the ways in which ordinary people made sense of world events, these revealing case studies illustrate photography's multilayered role as a new form of representation, a means to subjective experience, and a fresh mode of narrating the past.


  • A social event archive : invites you to contribute a social occasion photograph, 1997-2007 / Paul Druecke
    TR 689 S63 2017

  • Lower East and Upper West : New York City photographs 1957-1968 / Jonathan Brand ; with an introduction by Julia Dolan
    TR 659.8 B73 2018
    A census taker and later an advertising copywriter, Brand chronicled life as he encountered it on his walks through the city. The book offers 104 striking images of New Yorkers engaged in everyday pursuits, from the Bowery to Riverside Park, juice stands and barbershops to Theatre in the Streets. Brand's photographs capture the energy, odd juxtapositions and intimate moments of life in mid-century New York City.

  • Visual ethics : a guide for photographers, journalists, and filmmakers / Paul Martin Lester, with Stephanie A. Martin and Martin Smith-Rodden
    TR 183 L47 2018

    Visual Ethicsaddresses the need for critical thinking and ethical behavior among professionals responsible for visual messages in photography and photojournalism, film, and digital media. From the author of Photojournalism: An Ethical Approach , published more than 20 years ago, this book goes beyond photojournalism ethics. It discusses crucial contemporary concerns, including persuasion, stereotyping, global perspectives, graphic design decisions, multimedia production, social media, and more. Written for an ever-growing discipline, author Paul Martin Lester gives serious ethical consideration to the complex field of visual communication.


  • Marlene Creates : places, paths, and pauses : a retrospective / Susan Gibson Garvey & Andrea Kunard
    TR 647 C74 2017

    "... I was able to make a simple gesture which left no permanent mark on the land."

    In 1979 Marlene Creates signaled her intent. In contrast to the monumental earthworks of that time, she revealed that her interest in the intersection of art and the natural world was with the ephemeral, the small scale, and the non-monumental, and with place , "not as a geographical location," she writes, "but as a process that involves memory, multiple narratives, ecology, language, and both scientific and vernacular knowledge." Supplementing the impermanence of her artistic gestures with the technology of photography, Creates found an audience and created a body of work without peer.

    Creates has sensitvely probed the relationship between human experience and the natural world for almost four decades. From her early works that record traces of the human body on the land to her later explorations of poetry in situ in the boreal forest and photography as an active medium -- where the rush of water over the lens transforms the artist's own image -- Creates leads us with an environmental and cultural consciousness to a greater understanding of the language of the natural world and our "places" in it.

    It is no easy task to sum up, in a single book, a career that privileges the act over the artifact, the moment over the monument. But under the direction of curator-critics Susan Gibson Garvey and Andrea Kunard, Marlene Creates: Places, Paths, and Pauses offers not only a broad view of her work in photography but also a critical appreciation of her multi-disciplinary approach (assemblages, memory-map drawings, and video-poems) through essays by Gibson Garvey and Kunard, art historian Joan M. Schwartz, nature writer Robert Macfarlane, and poet Don McKay.

    Marlene Creates: Places, Paths, and Pauses accompanies a major retrospective touring exhibition organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in partnership with the Dalhousie Art Gallery. It will open in Fredericton in September 2017 and thereafter will be shown at galleries in Halifax, Charlottetown, St. John's, and other venues in central and western Canada.


  • Dornith Doherty : archiving Eden
    TR 724 D64 2017
    Spurred Spurred by the impending completion of the Svarlbard Global Seed Vault, Archiving Eden explores the role of seed banks and their preservation efforts in the face of climate c hange, the extinction of natural species, and decreased agricultural diversity. Serving as a global botanical backup system, these privately and publicly funded institutions assure the opportunity for the reintroduction of species should a catastrophic event or civil strife affect a key ecosystem somewhere in the world. Since 2008, Dornith Doherty has worked in collaboration with renowned biologists at the most comprehensive international seed banks in the world: the United States D epartment of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service's National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Colorado, USA, the Millennium Seed Bank, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the UK.; and PlantBank, Threatened Flora Centre, and Kings Park Botanic G ardens in Australia. Utilising the archives' on - site X - ray equipment that is routinely used for viability assessments of accessioned seeds, Doherty documents and subsequently collages the seeds and tissue samples stored in these crucial collections. The am azing visual power of magnified X - ray images, which springs from the technology's ability to record what is invisible to the human eye, illuminates her considerations not only of the complex philosophical, anthropological, and ecological issues surrounding the role of science and human agency in relation to gene banking, but also of the poetic questions about life and time on a macro and micro scale. Doherty is struck by the power of these tiny plantlets and seeds (many are the size of a grain of sand) to g enerate life and to endure the time span central to the process of seed banking, which seeks to make these sparks last for two hundred years or more. Use of the colour delft/indigo blue evokes references not only to the process of cryogenic preservation, c entral to the methodology of saving seeds, but also to the intersection of East and West, trade, cultural exchange, and migration. This tension between stillness and change reflects her focus on the elusive goal of stopping time in relation to living mater ials, which at some moment, we may all want to do.

  • The Louisiana book / Rineke Dijkstra
    TR 647 D5753 2017
    Rineke Dijkstra (b. 1959) is one of the most prominent and internationally acclaimed artists working within the genre of photography and video portraiture. Her large-scale photographs show a rare sense of humanity, empathy and intimacy without any trace of sentimentality or indiscretion. Dijkstra typically captures her subjects at moments of transition or vulnerability, thus focusing on the thematics of identity. Though absolutely modern, even timeless, her portraiture brings to mind the great masters of the Golden Age of Dutch art. 'I try to capture something of the personality of these people,' Rineke Dijkstra explains, 'but at the same time extract something universal relating to humanity in general. There has to be enough space to make your own stories; to interpret a picture the way you want.'

  • Arnold Zageris : On the Labrador / curated by Linda Jansma and Carla Garnet
    TR 647 Z34 2012
    Arnold Zageris's large format photographic colour prints focus on arctic and sub-arctic regions of Canada. Zageris captures the images using a traditional large format 4x5 view camera, technology that is unsurpassed for landscape photography in this digital age. The method allows for fine details and subtle nuances of form and texture to emerge. Although the colours and contrasts may appear enhanced, these works have no special filters or treatments. Zageris states his commitment is "to search and find the quality of light that can inspire the imagination." His combination of traditional technique and methodical patience lends him the ability to show us a world we may not see otherwise; an extraordinary view of a geographic region not often travelled.

  • Learning Blender : a hands-on guide to creating 3D animated characters / Oliver Villar
    TR 897.72 B55 V55 2017
    Now fully updated for Blender 2.78b and beyond, Learning Blender, Second Edition, walks you through every step of creating an outstanding 3D animated character with Blender, and then compositing it in a real video using a professional workflow. This edition covers the powerful new selection and modeling tools, as well as high-efficiency improvements related to other parts of the project such as texture painting, shading, rigging, rendering, and compositing.

    Still the only Blender tutorial to take you from preproduction to final result, this guide is perfect for both novices and those moving from other software to Blender (open source and free software). Author Oliver Villar provides full-colour, hands-on chapters that cover every aspect of character creation: design, modeling, unwrapping, texturing, shading, rigging, animation, and rendering. He also walks you through integrating your animated character into a real-world video, using professional camera tracking, lighting, and compositing techniques.


  • The Kinetoscope : a British history / Richard Brown and Barry Anthony ; with an additional chapter by Michael Harvey ; foreword by Charles Musser
    TR 885 B74 2017

    The 100th anniversary of cinema was marked throughout the world in 1995/6. Amongst the widespread celebrations it was largely overlooked that genuine motion pictures had been commercially shown 101 years earlier, and that the origins of the film industry lay in a peepshow device rather than the more familiar movie projector. Introduced in New York in April 1894 and in Paris and London later in the same year, Thomas Edison's electrically-driven Kinetoscope was the first practical method of film exhibition. Around a thousand of these state-of-the art machines were manufactured, featuring the first brief fiction films and the earliest newsreels. Techniques such as the close-up and stop-editing were introduced and the 35mm film employed became a universal standard. Edison was able to influence the development of the device in the United States, but he soon lost control of the British and European markets. Spearheaded by two entrepreneurial Greek merchants, George Georgiades and George Tragides, a large and often colorful group of showmen began to exploit the new invention. With Edison neglecting to obtain European patents, his agents fought a losing battle to stem an influx of 'bogus' Kinetoscopes onto the market. Leading the construction of replica Kinetoscopes was a young and ambitious electrical engineer who was to become central to the development of world cinema. In his business arrangements with the Greeks Robert William Paul operated close to the limits of legality, a risk-taking attitude that also led him to enter into a partnership with the notorious fraudster and self-publicist 'Viscount' Hinton. The rush to exploit the Kinetoscope faltered when Edison refused to supply films for pirate machines, but regained momentum when Paul and the American Birt Acres constructed their own camera, shooting the first British movies in March/April 1895. The turbulent and often unlikely events of 1894-5 were a crucial prelude to the birth of British cinema.

    The posit


  • Platinum and palladium photographs : technical history, connoisseurship, and preservation / edited by Constance McCabe
    TR 420 P63 2017

  • The faraway nearby : photographs of Canada from the New York Times Photo Archive / edited by Denise Birkhofer and Gerald McMaster
    TR 6 C22 T67 2017
    On the occasion of Canada's 150th Anniversary, Black Dog Publishing and The Ryerson Image Centre present a century of Canadian history, told by way of 150 iconic photographs of Canada.

    Taking an expansive view of many of the diverse histories that have constituted Canadian life, The Faraway Nearby highlights images of major political events and conflicts, the Canadian role in wartime, iconic landscapes across the nation, hockey and other sporting heroes, and candid reportage on the lives of ordinary citizens.

    Also featured prominently are images of Indigenous peoples, migrant communities, portraits of such iconic figures as Margaret Atwood, Glenn Gould, Marshall McLuhan, Joni Mitchell, and Pierre Elliott Trudeau and various notable international figures on official visits to Canada.

  • Honesty, hope & hard work / Kim Waldron
    TR 140 W32A4 2014

  • Autobiography Sol LeWitt 1980
    TR 654 L46 1980
page last updated on: Saturday 26 May 2018
Back to top Back to top