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Photography - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range TR1 - TR1050 (Photography) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Jeff Wall : north & west
    TR 647 W34 2015
    Jeff Wall has lived in his hometown of Vancouver for all but four years of his life. Most of the images he has created are shot in and around that city, yet his art transcends these local subjects and addresses universal themes of history and memory. That explains why his work is celebrated around the world and has been the subject of countless international exhibitions from the Tate Modern, to MoMa, to the Art Institute of Chicago. His importance to photoconceptualism is recognized throughout the art world and his cinematographic pictures are immensely popular with the public and the academy alike. The images he has chosen for North and West explore the meaning of history and how we remember the cities we inhabit. The towns imprinted in our minds no longer exist. Urban landscapes constantly change but the remnants of the past remain and history's influence never ends. North and West is a succinct and indispensible look into the profoundly moving and influential oeuvre of Jeff Wall.

  • Technologies of vision : the war between data and images / Steve Anderson
    TR 184 A53 2017eb

    An investigation of the computational turn in visual culture, centered on the entangled politics and pleasures of data and images.

    If the twentieth century was tyrannized by images, then the twenty-first is ruled by data. In Technologies of Vision , Steve Anderson argues that visual culture and the methods developed to study it have much to teach us about today's digital culture; but first we must examine the historically entangled relationship between data and images. Anderson starts from the supposition that there is no great divide separating pre- and post-digital culture. Rather than creating an insular field of new and inaccessible discourse, he argues, it is more productive to imagine that studying "the digital" is coextensive with critical models--especially the politics of seeing and knowing--developed for understanding "the visual."

    Anderson's investigation takes on an eclectic array of examples ranging from virtual reality, culture analytics, and software art to technologies for computer vision, face recognition, and photogrammetry. Mixing media archaeology with software studies, Anderson mines the history of technology for insight into both the politics of data and the pleasures of algorithms. He proposes a taxonomy of modes that describe the functional relationship between data and images in the domains of space, surveillance and data visualization. At stake in all three are tensions between the totalizing logic of data and the unruly chaos of images.


  • Jeannette Klute : A Photographic Pioneer / [text by] Therese Mulligan
    TR 721 J43 2017eb

  • Photography and American Coloniality : Eliot Elisofon in Africa, 1942–1972 / Raoul J. Granqvist
    TR 140 E4 G73 2017eb
    This book is the first to question both why and how the colonialist mythologies represented by the work of photographer Eliot Elisofon persist. It documents and discusses a heterogeneous practice of American coloniality of power as it explores Elisofon's career as war photographer-correspondent and staff photographer for LIFE , filmmaker, author, artist, and collector of "primitive art" and sculpture. It focuses on three areas: Elisofon's narcissism, voyeurism, and sexism; his involvement in the homogenizing of Western social orders and colonial legacies; and his enthused mission of "sending home" a mass of still-life photographs, annexed African artifacts, and assumed vintage knowledge. The book does not challenge his artistic merit or his fascinating personality; what it does question is his production and imagining of "difference." As the text travels from World War II to colonialism, postcolonialism, and the Cold War, from Casablanca to Leopoldville (Kinshasa), it proves to be a necessarily strenuous and provocative trip.

  • The Kinetoscope : A British History / Richard Brown and Barry Anthony ; with an additional chapter by Michael Harvey ; foreword by Charles Musser
    TR 885 B765 2017eb

    The 100th anniversary of cinema was marked throughout the world in 1995/6. Amongst the widespread celebrations it was largely overlooked that genuine motion pictures had been commercially shown 101 years earlier, and that the origins of the film industry lay in a peepshow device rather than the more familiar movie projector. Introduced in New York in April 1894 and in Paris and London later in the same year, Thomas Edison's electrically-driven Kinetoscope was the first practical method of film exhibition. Around a thousand of these state-of-the art machines were manufactured, featuring the first brief fiction films and the earliest newsreels. Techniques such as the close-up and stop-editing were introduced and the 35mm film employed became a universal standard. Edison was able to influence the development of the device in the United States, but he soon lost control of the British and European markets. Spearheaded by two entrepreneurial Greek merchants, George Georgiades and George Tragides, a large and often colorful group of showmen began to exploit the new invention. With Edison neglecting to obtain European patents, his agents fought a losing battle to stem an influx of 'bogus' Kinetoscopes onto the market. Leading the construction of replica Kinetoscopes was a young and ambitious electrical engineer who was to become central to the development of world cinema. In his business arrangements with the Greeks Robert William Paul operated close to the limits of legality, a risk-taking attitude that also led him to enter into a partnership with the notorious fraudster and self-publicist 'Viscount' Hinton. The rush to exploit the Kinetoscope faltered when Edison refused to supply films for pirate machines, but regained momentum when Paul and the American Birt Acres constructed their own camera, shooting the first British movies in March/April 1895. The turbulent and often unlikely events of 1894-5 were a crucial prelude to the birth of British cinema.

    The posit


  • My Life in Focus : A Photographer's Journey with Elizabeth Taylor and the Hollywood Jet Set / Gianni Bozzacchi with Joey Tayler
    TR 140 B67 A3 2017eb

    When Gianni Bozzacchi accepted an assignment as a photographer on the set of The Comedians (1967), he didn't know that his life was about to change forever. His ability to capture the beauty of candid moments drew the attention of the film's star, Elizabeth Taylor, and prompted her to hire him as her personal photographer. Not only did he go on to enjoy a jet-set life as her friend and confidant -- preserving unguarded moments between the violet-eyed beauty and Richard Burton as they traveled the world -- but Bozzacchi also became an internationally renowned photographer and shot some of the biggest celebrities of the 1960s and 1970s.

    In My Life in Focus , Bozzacchi traces his journey from humble beginnings to the sphere of the rich and famous. As a child, he cultivated his skills by working with his father -- a photographer for the Italian government. Following in his parent's footsteps was not something Bozzacchi had foreseen for his future; but his passion for taking pictures and his ability to put his subjects at ease enabled him to capture stunning images of some of the greatest stars of the twentieth century, including Audrey Hepburn, Steve McQueen, Raquel Welch, Mia Farrow, Clint Eastwood, and the royal family of Monaco.

    Beautifully illustrated with many of the photographer's most iconic images, this lively memoir reveals private moments in the Taylor-Burton love story and provides an invaluable behind-the-scenes look at the business of filmmaking and the perils of celebrity.


  • Making Believe : Screen Performance and Special Effects in Popular Cinema / Lisa Bode
    TR 858 B63 2017eb
    In the past twenty years, we have seen the rise of digital effects cinema in which the human performer is entangled with animation, collaged with other performers, or inserted into perilous or fantastic situations and scenery. Making Believe sheds new light on these developments by historicizing screen performance within the context of visual and special effects cinema and technological change in Hollywood filmmaking, through the silent, early sound, and current digital eras.

    Making Believe incorporates North American film reviews and editorials, actor and crew interviews, trade and fan magazine commentary, actor training manuals, and film production publicity materials to discuss the shifts in screen acting practice and philosophy around transfiguring makeup, doubles, motion capture, and acting to absent places or characters. Along the way it considers how performers and visual and special effects crew work together, and struggle with the industry, critics, and each other to define the aesthetic value of their work, in an industrial system of technological reproduction. Bode opens our eyes to the performing illusions we love and the tensions we experience in wanting to believe in spite of our knowledge that it is all make believe in the end.

  • Folk Masters : A Portrait of America / photographs by Tom Pich ; text by Barry Bergey
    TR 681 A7P53 2017eb

    Discover one hundred of the greatest folk artists practicing in the United States in Folk Masters: A Portrait of America. Over the past 25 years, photographer Tom Pich has traveled the country to the homes and studios of recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts' National Heritage Fellowship, the highest honor given to folk and traditional artists in the US. His portraits give us a glimpse into their art, their process, and their culture. While each image tells a story on its own, Barry Bergey, former Director of Folk and Traditional Arts at the National Endowment for the Arts, provides further insight into the lives of each featured artist as well as the remarkable stories behind each photograph. Folk Masters honors again the extraordinary women and men who simultaneously take the traditional arts to new heights while ensuring their continuation from generation to generation.


  • Inadvertent images : a history of photographic apparitions / Peter Geimer ; translated by Gerrit Jackson
    TR 183 G4513 2018

  • Stephen Shore / Quentin Bajac ; with additional texts by David Campany, Kristen Gaylord, and Martino Stierli
    TR 647 S47 2017

    Organized into 60 thematic sections, this magisterial volume provides a complete overview of Shore's career--from the early portraits of Warhol's Factory to his latest Instagram images

    One of the most influential photographers of our time, Stephen Shore has often been categorized as one of a group of artists of the 1970s who captured American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous color images. While this is true, it is only part of the story: Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large format in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color film before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and, in the 2000s, taking up the opportunities offered by digital photography, digital printing and social media.

    Published to accompany the first comprehensive survey of Stephen Shore's work in the US, this catalog reflects the full range of his contribution, including the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager (and sold to The Museum of Modern Art); his photographs of the scene at Andy Warhol's Factory, in New York; the color images he made during cross-country road trips in the 1970s; his recent explorations of Israel, the West Bank and Ukraine; and his current work on digital platforms, including Instagram.

    This book offers a fresh, kaleidoscopic vision of the artist's extensive career, presenting more than 400 reproductions arranged in a thematic framework, each grouping accompanied by a short but wide-ranging essay. This unique encyclopedia-style format makes visible the artist's versatility of technique and the diversity of his output, reflecting his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography's possibilities.

    Stephen Shore (born 1947) was the first living photographer to have a solo show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York since Alfred Stieglitz (40 years earlier). He has also had solo shows at The Museum of Modern Art, New York; George Eastman House, Rochester; Kunsthalle, Dusseldorf; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Jeu de Paume, Paris; and the Art Institute of Chicago. Since 1982 he has been the director of the Photography Program at Bard College, New York, where he is the Susan Weber Professor in the Arts.


  • Field studies : walking through landscapes and archives / Chrystel Lebas ; texts by Nanda van den Berg, Bergit Arends, Marc Spencer, Liz Wells and Chrystel Lebas ; translation (nl-en), Ralph de Rijke
    TR 660 L43 2017

  • Haunt / photographs by Misty Keasler ; essays by Andrea Karnes & Margee Kerr
    TR 655 K43 2017
    Haunt is the second monograph by Dallas based photographer Misty Keasler and is a portrait of our culture and the study of fear as entertainment in commerical haunted houses. This work took Keasler to 13 haunts throughout the United States over the course of 2 years, where she was given unprecedented access to each location, shooting lengthy time exposures of uninhabited interiors and their facades on film, while additionally shooting formal portraits of their actors in costume. The resulting efforts yielded 146 vividly colorful, yet chilling photographs, that provide the viewer the space to experience the immense detail the proprietors of these haunts pour into them.In her essay, curator Andrea Karnes contextualizes this body of work within the conversation of contemporary photography as well as exploring its ties to the history of painting. An essay by sociologist and author Margee Kerr, provides an insider's glimpse of everything that makes up a great haunt, from the props to the psychological foundation of a good scare.

  • Eyes as big as plates / Karoline Hjorth, Riitta Ikonen
    TR 681 A35 H56 2017

    Eyes as Big as Plates is an ongoing collaborative photography and sculpture project by Norwegian-Finnish artist duo Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen (both born 1980).

    Initially a play on characters from Nordic folklore, the series has evolved into a search for the human connection to nature. Hjorth & Ikonen work together throughout the process with their complementary skills (Karoline is the photographer in the duo, while Riitta works mainly with the creation of the wearable sculptures). Since 2011 the duo has collaborated with retired farmers, fishermen, zoologists, plumbers, opera singers, housewives, artists and academics. Each character inhabits the landscape in a wearable sculpture made from natural materials.

    The book features portraits, field notes, essays and behind-the-scenes stories from many of the project's 60 shoots. With international press coverage in the Huffington Post , the BBC, TIME LightBox , Life and elsewhere, plus a highly successful Kickstarter campaign attracting a large American audience, the series has developed into a project with universal appeal.


  • To be thirteen / Betsy Schneider
    TR 680 S3 2017

    In 2011, Arizona-based photographer Betsy Schneider, herself the mother of a 13-year-old daughter, embarked on a project to explore the experience of being 13.

    Traveling around the United States, the Guggenheim grant recipient spent 2012 chronicling 250 13 year olds, creating still portraits and video documentation of each. The resulting body of work creates a rich collective portrait of a group of Americans whose lives began at the turn of the millennium and who are coming of age now.

    To Be Thirteen depicts all 250 portraits with brief quotations from the extended video interviews and an interview by Center for Creative Photography Chief Curator Rebecca Senf with Schneider, unpacking details about the artist's process, insights about the project and how it changed her, as well as longer excerpts from the subjects. This publication captures and conveys the experience of meeting with the artist and looking through a stack of prints with her, and will complement an exhibition of the project debuting at the Phoenix Art Museum in the spring of 2018.


  • Lotte Fløe Christensen : constructs
    TR 655 C5534 2017
    In 2009, Lotte Christensen travelled to the Canadian wilderness. As so often before, venturing into nature, she had her camera with her and was out to make pictures. Among mountains and trees, she found a good spot for an image. She put up the camera, ran into the frame and placed herself with a map between her hands. A "click" sounded, but not the usual "clack" of the mirror falling back into place - the camera was out of order. Being far away from civilization with a non - operational camera, the situation all of a sudden felt meaningless. It was the making of images, the exploration and documentation, that was her tool for being in, and dealing with, this foreign landscape. To create felt more important than to be. The act of making images is in itself a way of living life for Danish artist Lotte Christensen. The camera and the act of constructing and making an image is an essential approach to the world in search of an understanding of her place in it. She works as a visua l philosopher with photography and nature to construct images that explore existential issues. She enters the landscape using herself as a measuring tool, gently pulls plants though paper to isolate them from their natural environment, or brings back parts of nature to her outdoor studio to build fragile constructions. In line with the tradition of representing landscape in art history, in Lotte Christensen's work, nature acts as a projection screen for inner human dilemmas. Lotte Christensen's work speaks to the imminent human desire for a sense of meaning in existence: Why am I here in this world? As we measure, categorise and examine the world around us in order to understand and define our lives, we end up building an almost tragi - comical connection to the natural world, such as that of the scientist - at once observing and being part of the natural world. In the images and sculptural work of Christensen, this balance between heartfelt, honest attempts of making meaning and the sometimes humorous results co - exist in a strange and poetical universe

  • The ethics of seeing : photography and twentieth-century German history / edited by Jennifer Evans, Paul Betts, and Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
    TR 73 E84 2018

    Throughout Germany's tumultuous twentieth century, photography was an indispensable form of documentation. Whether acting as artists, witnesses, or reformers, both professional and amateur photographers chronicled social worlds through successive periods of radical upheaval. The Ethics of Seeing brings together an international group of scholars to explore the complex relationship between the visual and the historic in German history. Emphasizing the transformation of the visual arena and the ways in which ordinary people made sense of world events, these revealing case studies illustrate photography's multilayered role as a new form of representation, a means to subjective experience, and a fresh mode of narrating the past.


  • Lower East and Upper West : New York City photographs 1957-1968 / Jonathan Brand ; with an introduction by Julia Dolan
    TR 659.8 B73 2018
    A census taker and later an advertising copywriter, Brand chronicled life as he encountered it on his walks through the city. The book offers 104 striking images of New Yorkers engaged in everyday pursuits, from the Bowery to Riverside Park, juice stands and barbershops to Theatre in the Streets. With an introduction by Julia Dolan, The Minor White Curator of Photography at the Portland Art Museum, Oregon, this is the first book from a photographer who developed his art alongside many of the best-known in his discipline. Brand's photographs capture the energy, odd juxtapositions and intimate moments of life in mid-century New York City.

  • Dornith Doherty : archiving Eden
    TR 724 D64 2017
    Spurred Spurred by the impending completion of the Svarlbard Global Seed Vault, Archiving Eden explores the role of seed banks and their preservation efforts in the face of climate c hange, the extinction of natural species, and decreased agricultural diversity. Serving as a global botanical backup system, these privately and publicly funded institutions assure the opportunity for the reintroduction of species should a catastrophic event or civil strife affect a key ecosystem somewhere in the world. Since 2008, Dornith Doherty has worked in collaboration with renowned biologists at the most comprehensive international seed banks in the world: the United States D epartment of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service's National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Colorado, USA, the Millennium Seed Bank, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the UK.; and PlantBank, Threatened Flora Centre, and Kings Park Botanic G ardens in Australia. Utilising the archives' on - site X - ray equipment that is routinely used for viability assessments of accessioned seeds, Doherty documents and subsequently collages the seeds and tissue samples stored in these crucial collections. The am azing visual power of magnified X - ray images, which springs from the technology's ability to record what is invisible to the human eye, illuminates her considerations not only of the complex philosophical, anthropological, and ecological issues surrounding the role of science and human agency in relation to gene banking, but also of the poetic questions about life and time on a macro and micro scale. Doherty is struck by the power of these tiny plantlets and seeds (many are the size of a grain of sand) to g enerate life and to endure the time span central to the process of seed banking, which seeks to make these sparks last for two hundred years or more. Use of the colour delft/indigo blue evokes references not only to the process of cryogenic preservation, c entral to the methodology of saving seeds, but also to the intersection of East and West, trade, cultural exchange, and migration. This tension between stillness and change reflects her focus on the elusive goal of stopping time in relation to living mater ials, which at some moment, we may all want to do.

  • The Louisiana book / Rineke Dijkstra
    TR 647 D5753 2017
    Rineke Dijkstra (b. 1959) is one of the most prominent and internationally acclaimed artists working within the genre of photography and video portraiture. Her large-scale photographs show a rare sense of humanity, empathy and intimacy without any trace of sentimentality or indiscretion. Dijkstra typically captures her subjects at moments of transition or vulnerability, thus focusing on the thematics of identity. Though absolutely modern, even timeless, her portraiture brings to mind the great masters of the Golden Age of Dutch art. 'I try to capture something of the personality of these people,' Rineke Dijkstra explains, 'but at the same time extract something universal relating to humanity in general. There has to be enough space to make your own stories; to interpret a picture the way you want.'

  • Learning Blender : a hands-on guide to creating 3D animated characters / Oliver Villar
    TR 897.72 B55 V55 2017
    Now fully updated for Blender 2.78b and beyond, Learning Blender, Second Edition, walks you through every step of creating an outstanding 3D animated character with Blender, and then compositing it in a real video using a professional workflow. This edition covers the powerful new selection and modeling tools, as well as high-efficiency improvements related to other parts of the project such as texture painting, shading, rigging, rendering, and compositing.

    Still the only Blender tutorial to take you from preproduction to final result, this guide is perfect for both novices and those moving from other software to Blender (open source and free software). Author Oliver Villar provides full-colour, hands-on chapters that cover every aspect of character creation: design, modeling, unwrapping, texturing, shading, rigging, animation, and rendering. He also walks you through integrating your animated character into a real-world video, using professional camera tracking, lighting, and compositing techniques.


  • The Kinetoscope : a British history / Richard Brown and Barry Anthony ; with an additional chapter by Michael Harvey ; foreword by Charles Musser
    TR 885 B74 2017

    The 100th anniversary of cinema was marked throughout the world in 1995/6. Amongst the widespread celebrations it was largely overlooked that genuine motion pictures had been commercially shown 101 years earlier, and that the origins of the film industry lay in a peepshow device rather than the more familiar movie projector. Introduced in New York in April 1894 and in Paris and London later in the same year, Thomas Edison's electrically-driven Kinetoscope was the first practical method of film exhibition. Around a thousand of these state-of-the art machines were manufactured, featuring the first brief fiction films and the earliest newsreels. Techniques such as the close-up and stop-editing were introduced and the 35mm film employed became a universal standard. Edison was able to influence the development of the device in the United States, but he soon lost control of the British and European markets. Spearheaded by two entrepreneurial Greek merchants, George Georgiades and George Tragides, a large and often colorful group of showmen began to exploit the new invention. With Edison neglecting to obtain European patents, his agents fought a losing battle to stem an influx of 'bogus' Kinetoscopes onto the market. Leading the construction of replica Kinetoscopes was a young and ambitious electrical engineer who was to become central to the development of world cinema. In his business arrangements with the Greeks Robert William Paul operated close to the limits of legality, a risk-taking attitude that also led him to enter into a partnership with the notorious fraudster and self-publicist 'Viscount' Hinton. The rush to exploit the Kinetoscope faltered when Edison refused to supply films for pirate machines, but regained momentum when Paul and the American Birt Acres constructed their own camera, shooting the first British movies in March/April 1895. The turbulent and often unlikely events of 1894-5 were a crucial prelude to the birth of British cinema.

    The posit


  • Platinum and palladium photographs : technical history, connoisseurship, and preservation / edited by Constance McCabe
    TR 420 P63 2017
    The volume presents the results of a four-year inter-institutional, interdisciplinary research initiative led and organized by the National Gallery of Art. Contributions by 47 leading photograph conservators, scientists, and historians provide detailed examinations of the chemical, material, and aesthetic qualities of this important class of rare, beautiful, and technically complex photographs. The volume will help those who care for photograph collections gain a thorough appreciation of the technical and aesthetic characteristics of platinum and palladium prints and scientific basis for their preservation.

  • Autobiography Sol LeWitt 1980
    TR 654 L46 1980
page last updated on: Monday 18 June 2018
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