« Back | Print 
Concordia.ca   /   Library   /   About the library   /   News   /   Acquisitions

New books by subject

sort items by: 
 RSS

C - Auxiliary Sciences of History (Archaeology, Genealogy, ...) - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Auxiliary Sciences of History (Archaeology, Genealogy, ...) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 90 days.


  • Archive everything : mapping the everyday / Gabriella Giannachi
    CD 947 G53 2016

    How the archive evolved to include new technologies, practices, and media, and how it became the apparatus through which we map the everyday.

    In Archive Everything , Gabriella Giannachi traces the evolution of the archive into the apparatus through which we map the everyday. The archive, traditionally a body of documents or a site for the preservation of documents, changed over the centuries to encompass, often concurrently, a broad but interrelated number of practices not traditionally considered as archival. Archives now consist of not only documents and sites but also artworks, installations, museums, social media platforms, and mediated and mixed reality environments. Giannachi tracks the evolution of these diverse archival practices across the centuries.

    Archives today offer a multiplicity of viewing platforms to replay the past, capture the present, and map our presence. Giannachi uses archaeological practices to explore all the layers of the archive, analyzing Lynn Hershman Leeson's !Women Art Revolution project, a digital archive of feminist artists. She considers the archive as a memory laboratory, with case studies that include visitors' encounters with archival materials in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. She discusses the importance of participatory archiving, examining the "multimedia roadshow" Digital Diaspora Family Reunion as an example. She explores the use of the archive in works that express the relationship between ourselves and our environment, citing Andy Warhol and Ant Farm, among others. And she looks at the transmission of the archive through the body in performance, bioart, and database artworks, closing with a detailed analysis of Lynn Hershman Leeson's Infinity Engine .


  • Our oldest task : making sense of our place in nature / Eric T. Freyfogle
    CB 460 F74 2017
    "This is a book about nature and culture," Eric T. Freyfogle writes, "about our place and plight on earth, and the nagging challenges we face in living on it in ways that might endure." Challenges, he says, we are clearly failing to meet. Harking back to a key phrase from the essays of eminent American conservationist Aldo Leopold, Our Oldest Task spins together lessons from history and philosophy, the life sciences and politics, economics and cultural studies in a personal, erudite quest to understand how we might live on--and in accord with--the land.

    Passionate and pragmatic, extraordinarily well read and eloquent, Freyfogle details a host of forces that have produced our self-defeating ethos of human exceptionalism. It is this outlook, he argues, not a lack of scientific knowledge or inadequate technology, that is the primary cause of our ecological predicament. Seeking to comprehend both the multifaceted complexity of contemporary environmental problems and the zeitgeist as it unfolds, Freyfogle explores such diverse topics as morality, the nature of reality (and the reality of nature), animal welfare, social justice movements, and market politics. The result is a learned and inspiring rallying cry to achieve balance, a call to use our knowledge to more accurately identify the dividing line between living in and on the world and destruction. "To use nature," Freyfogle writes, "but not to abuse it."

  • Zooarchaeology in the Neotropics : environmental diversity and human-animal interactions / Mariana Mondini, A. Sebastián Muñoz, Pablo M. Fernández, editors
    CC79.5.A5

  • Urban archaeology, municipal government and local planning : preserving heritage within the Commonwealth of Nations and the United States / Sherene Baugher, Douglas R. Appler, William Moss, editors
    CC 77 U72 U73 2017eb

  • Sapiens : a brief history of humankind / Yuval Noah Harari
    CB 113 H4 H3713 2016
    Destined to become a modern classic in the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel , Sapiens is a lively, groundbreaking history of humankind told from a unique perspective.
    nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;100,000 years ago, at least six species of human inhabited the earth. Today there is just one.
    nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Us.
    Homo Sapiens .
    nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come?
    nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; In Sapiens , Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical -- and sometimes devastating -- breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come?
    nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power...and our future.
page last updated on: Sunday 19 November 2017
Back to top Back to top