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P - Language and Literature - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Language and Literature that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • Elmet / Fiona Mozley
    PR 6113 O97 E46 2017

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017

    'A quiet explosion of a book, exquisite and unforgettable' The Economist

    'A cleverly constructed rural Gothic fable . . . Elmet is a marvellous achievement' TLS

    'Pastoral idyll, political expos#65533;, cosy family saga and horror tale, it reads like a traditional children's story that turns into a gangster film: Hansel and Gretel meets The Godfather' Sunday Times

    Daniel is heading north. He is looking for someone. The simplicity of his early life with Daddy and Cathy has turned menacing and fearful. They lived apart in the house that Daddy built for them in the woods with his bare hands. They foraged and hunted.

    Cathy was more like their father: fierce and full of simmering anger. Daniel was more like their mother: gentle and kind. Sometimes, their father disappeared, and would return with a rage in his eyes. But when he was at home, he was at peace. He told them that the little copse in Elmet was theirs alone. But that wasn't true. Local men, greedy and watchful, began to circle like vultures. All the while, the terrible violence in Daddy grew.

    Brutal and beautiful in equal measure, Elmet is a compelling portrayal of a family living on the fringes of contemporary society, as well as a gripping exploration of the disturbing actions people are capable of when pushed to their limits.


  • Tact : aesthetic liberalism and the essay form in nineteenth-century Britain / David Russell
    PR 766 A38 R87 2018

    The social practice of tact was an invention of the nineteenth century, a period when Britain was witnessing unprecedented urbanization, industrialization, and population growth. In an era when more and more people lived more closely than ever before with people they knew less and less about, tact was a new mode of feeling one's way with others in complex modern conditions. In this book, David Russell traces how the essay genre came to exemplify this sensuous new ethic and aesthetic.

    Russell argues that the essay form provided the resources for the performance of tact in this period and analyzes its techniques in the writings of Charles Lamb, John Stuart Mill, Matthew Arnold, George Eliot, and Walter Pater. He shows how their essays offer grounds for a claim about the relationship among art, education, and human freedom--an "aesthetic liberalism"--not encompassed by traditional political philosophy or in literary criticism. For these writers, tact is not about codes of politeness but about making an art of ordinary encounters with people and objects and evoking the fullest potential in each new encounter. Russell demonstrates how their essays serve as a model for a critical handling of the world that is open to surprises, and from which egalitarian demands for new relationships are made.

    Offering fresh approaches to thinking about criticism, sociability, politics, and art, Tact concludes by following a legacy of essayistic tact to the practice of British psychoanalysts like D. W. Winnicott and Marion Milner.


  • Empirical approaches to cognitive linguistics : analyzing real-life data / edited by Milla Luodonpää-Manni, Esa Penttilä and Johanna Viimaranta
    P 165 E55 2017eb

  • Malinche / Laura Esquivel ; translated by Ernesto Mestre-Reed ; illustrations by Jordi Castells
    PQ 7298.15 S638 M3513 2006
    From the international bestselling author of Like Water for Chocolate comes an extraordinary new historical novel about a passionate and tragic love affair during the conquest of the Aztecs.

  • La foi du braconnier : roman / Marc Séguin
    PS 8637 E476 F64 2012

  • The Routledge companion to cinema and gender / edited by Kristin Lené Hole, Dijana Jelaca, E. Ann Kaplan, and Patrice Petro
    PN 1995.9 S47 R68 2017

  • The rise of transtexts : challenges and opportunities / edited by Benjamin W.L. Derhy Kurtz and Mélanie Bourdaa
    P 96 M36 R57 2017eb

  • Machine translation : 13th China Workshop, CWMT 2017, Dalian, China, September 27-29, 2017, Revised selected papers / Derek F. Wong, Deyi Xiong (eds.)
    P308

  • Corpus linguistics and statistics with R : introduction to quantitative methods in linguistics / Guillaume Desagulier
    P128.C68

  • The dark arrow of time a scientific novel / Massimo Villata
    PQ4922

  • Computational and corpus-based phraseology : second International Conference, Europhras 2017, London, UK, November 13-14, 2017, Proceedings / Ruslan Mitkov (ed.)
    P326.5.P45

  • Hermeneutics of the film world : a Ricœurian method for film interpretation / Alberto Baracco
    PN1995

  • Nineteenth-Century Poetry and Liberal Thought Forms of Freedom / Anna Barton
    PN1111

  • The British cinema boom 1906-1914 : a commercial history / Jon Burrows
    PN1993.5.G7

  • British Romanticism, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene Writing Tambora
    PR149.D57

  • Shakespeare and Conceptual Blending Cognition, Creativity, Criticism
    PR2976

  • Gender, authorship, and early modern women's collaboration / Patricia Pender
    PR113

  • Public medievalists, racism, and suffrage in the American women's college / Mary Dockray-Miller
    PE120.U6

  • Homosexuality and Italian Cinema From the Fall of Fascism to the Years of Lead
    PN1995.9.H55

  • Satire and politics : the interplay of heritage and practice / Jessica Milner Davis, editor
    PN6149.P64

  • Media in the Middle East Activism, Politics, and Culture
    P92.M628

  • Adaptation and nation theatrical contexts for contemporary English and Irish drama / Catherine Rees
    PR635.A3

  • The legacy of courtly literature from Medieval to contemporary culture / Deborah Nelson-Campbell, Rouben Cholakian, editors
    PN682.C6

  • International performance research pedagogies towards an unconditional discipline? / edited by Sruti Bala, Milija Gluhovic, Hanna Korsberg and Kati Röttger ; with a foreword by Baz Kershaw
    PN2075

  • Shakespeare/not Shakespeare Christy Desmet, Natalie Loper, Jim Casey, editors
    PR2880.A1

  • Animals on Television The Cultural Making of the Non-Human
    PN1992.8.A58

  • Oscar Wilde and the cultures of childhood Joseph Bristow, editor
    PR5823

  • Theatre Aurality
    PN2091.S6

  • Landscape and the environment in Hollywood film the green machine / Ellen E. Moore
    PN1995.9.E78

  • Narratives of inequality postcolonial literary economics / Melissa Kennedy
    PN51

  • Alan Moore, out from the underground cartooning, performance, and dissent / Maggie Gray
    PN6737.M66

  • Literature and the global contemporary Sarah Brouillette, Mathias Nilges, Emilio Sauri, editors
    PS374.C596

  • Poetry and mindfulness interruption to a journey / Bryan Walpert
    PN1075

  • The absent mother in the cultural imagination : missing, presumed dead / Berit Åström
    PN441

  • Hercule chrestien / Pierre de Ronsard ; translated by F.W. Bornhauser ; afterword by Oliver Steele
    PQ 1676 H78 E5 1972

  • The sonnets : the state of play / edited by Hannah Crawforth, Elizabeth Scott-Baumann and Clare Whitehead
    PR 2848 S646 2017
    Shakespeare's Sonnets both generate and demonstrate many of today's most pressing debates about Shakespeare and poetry. They explore history and aesthetics, gender and society, time and memory, and continue to invite divergent responses from critics and poets. This freeze-frame volume showcases the range of current debate and ideas surrounding these still startling poems. Each chapter has been carefully selected for its originality and relevance to the needs of students, teachers, and researchers. Key themes and topics covered include:Textual issues and editing the sonnetsReception, interpretation and critical history of the sonnetsThe place of the sonnets in teachingCritical approaches and close readingMemorialisation and monument-makingContemporary poetry and the SonnetsAll the essays offer new perspectives and combine to give readers an up-to-date understanding of what is exciting and challenging about Shakespeare's Sonnets. The approach, based on an individual poetic form, reflects how the sonnets are most commonly studied and taught.

  • Birds, peace, wealth : Aristophanes' critique of the gods / three plays translated by Wayne Ambler and Thomas L. Pangle
    PA 3877 A3 A47 2013

    In these three raucous comedies, mortals outwit and even replace Zeus and other Olympian deities of the Greek Pantheon. As Aristophanes provokes laughter at the foibles of gods and men, he arouses wonder at our human need for the divine.

    "The three comic heroes in the plays included here raise the questions of whether there are gods, who they might be, how powerful they are, and how they might be changed or eliminated. Although the precise form of such questions changes from age to age, these are questions that are inseparable from political life; and they certainly are powerfully present in our own day...great theorists and architects of the modern liberal state designed its contours partly with an eye on the goalof diminishing the role of religion in the public square. Not unlike our three comic heroes, they wanted to reduce dependence on "Zeus" and his priests. In his place, and like our three heroes, they sought peace, wealth, and human rulers liberated from exaggerated piety. And nowadays the so-called New Atheists are pressing the case that it is high time for a final defeat and elimination of the powers of darkness that, in their view, have cost us so much blood and treasure...Aristophanes was not a modern liberal; still less would he agree with the New Atheists' advocacy of universal public atheism. He does, however, put dissatisfaction with the gods at the center of the three plays included here, does bestow victories on the human critics of those gods, and does invite us to think with him about the justice of their causes, the tactics behind their victories, and the limits of their successes."--From the Introduction

    Aristophanes was a prolific and much acclaimed comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his forty plays survive virtually complete. Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author.

    Thomas Lee Pangle holds the Joe R. Long Chair in Democratic Studies at the University of Texas.

    Wayne Ambler is associate professor in the Herbst Program of Humanities for Engineers at the University of Colorado.




  • The Cambridge history of Italian literature / edited by Peter Brand and Lino Pertile
    PQ 4038 C35 1999eb

  • The Cambridge history of postcolonial literature. edited by Ato Quayson
    PR 9080 C35 2011eb

  • The Cambridge history of postcolonial literature. edited by Ato Quayson
    PR 9080 C36 2012eb

  • The Cambridge history of American theatre. edited by Don B. Wilmeth, Christopher Bigsby
    PN 2221 C36 1998eb

  • The Cambridge history of American theatre. edited by Don B. Wilmeth, Christopher Bigsby
    PN 2221 C36 1999eb

  • The Cambridge history of American theatre. edited by Don B. Wilmeth, Christopher Bigsby
    PN 2221 C36 2000eb

  • The Cambridge history of African and Caribbean literature. edited by F. Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi
    PN 841 C36 2004eb

  • The Cambridge history of African and Caribbean literature. edited by F. Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi
    PN 841 C36 2004eb

  • British working-class fiction : narratives of refusal and the struggle against work / Roberto del Valle Alcalá
    PR 888 L3 D45 2016
    British Fiction and the Struggle Against Work offers an account of British literary responses to work from the 1950s to the onset of the financial crisis of 2008/9. Roberto del Valle Alcal#65533; argues that throughout this period, working-class writing developed new strategies of resistance against the social discipline imposed by capitalist work. As the latter becomes an increasingly pervasive and inescapable form of control and as its nature grows abstract, diffuse, and precarious, writing about it acquires a new antagonistic quality, producing new forms of subjective autonomy and new imaginaries of a possible life beyond its purview. By tracing a genealogy of working-class authors and texts that in various ways defined themselves against the social discipline imposed by post-war capitalism, this book analyses the strategies adopted by workers in their attempts to identify and combat the source of their oppression. Drawing on the work of a wide range of theorists including Deleuze and Guattari, Giorgio Agamben and Antonio Negri, Alcal#65533; offers a systematic and innovative account of British literary treatments of work. The book includes close readings of fiction by Alan Sillitoe, David Storey, Nell Dunn, Pat Barker, James Kelman, Irvine Welsh, Monica Ali, and Joanna Kavenna.

  • British working-class fiction : narratives of refusal and the struggle against work / Roberto del Valle Alcalá
    PR 888 L3 D45 2016
    British Fiction and the Struggle Against Work offers an account of British literary responses to work from the 1950s to the onset of the financial crisis of 2008/9. Roberto del Valle Alcal#65533; argues that throughout this period, working-class writing developed new strategies of resistance against the social discipline imposed by capitalist work. As the latter becomes an increasingly pervasive and inescapable form of control and as its nature grows abstract, diffuse, and precarious, writing about it acquires a new antagonistic quality, producing new forms of subjective autonomy and new imaginaries of a possible life beyond its purview. By tracing a genealogy of working-class authors and texts that in various ways defined themselves against the social discipline imposed by post-war capitalism, this book analyses the strategies adopted by workers in their attempts to identify and combat the source of their oppression. Drawing on the work of a wide range of theorists including Deleuze and Guattari, Giorgio Agamben and Antonio Negri, Alcal#65533; offers a systematic and innovative account of British literary treatments of work. The book includes close readings of fiction by Alan Sillitoe, David Storey, Nell Dunn, Pat Barker, James Kelman, Irvine Welsh, Monica Ali, and Joanna Kavenna.

  • Undocumented : the architecture of migrant detention / by Tings Chak
    PN 6733 C46 U53 2014

  • Open space new media documentary : a toolkit for theory and practice / Patricia R. Zimmermann and Helen De Michiel
    PN 1995.9 D6 Z56 2018eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language. origins and development / edited by Robert Burchfield
    PE 1713 C36 1994eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language. edited by Suzanne Romaine
    PE 1083 C36 1998eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language. edited by John Algeo
    PE 2809 C36 2001eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language : Vol. I, the beginnings to 1066 / edited by Richard M. Hogg
    PE 1072 C36 2008eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language. edited by Roger Lass
    PE 1079 C36 1999eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language. edited by Roger Lass
    PE 1079 C36 1999eb

  • The Cambridge history of the English language : Vol. 2, edited by Norman Blake
    PE 1072 C36 2008eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by Glyn Norton
    PN 86 C27 1999eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by Alistair Minnis and Ian Johnson
    PN 86 C27 2005eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by George A. Kennedy
    PN 86 C27 1990eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. From formalism to poststructuralism / edited by Raman Selden
    PN 86 C27 1995eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by Marshall Brown
    PN 86 C27 2000eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by H.B. Nisbet, Claude Rawson
    PN 86 C27 1997eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by Christa Knellwolf and Christopher Norris ; assistant editor, Jessica Osborn
    PN 86 C27 2001eb

  • The Cambridge history of literary criticism. edited by A. Walton Litz, Louis Menand and Lawrence Rainey
    PN 86 C27 2000eb

  • The Cambridge History of Latin American Literature edited by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarría, Enrique Pupo-Walker
    PQ 7081 A1 C35 1996eb

  • The Cambridge History of Latin American Literature edited by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarría, Enrique Pupo-Walker
    PQ 7081 A1 C35 1996eb

  • The Cambridge History of Latin American Literature edited by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarría, Enrique Pupo-Walker
    PQ 7081 A1 C35 1996eb

  • The Cambridge history of Irish literature. edited by Margaret Kelleher and Philip O'Leary
    PB 1306 C36 2006eb

  • The Cambridge history of Irish literature. edited by Margaret Kelleher and Philip O'Leary
    PB 1306 C36 2006eb

  • It's a good life, if you don't weaken : [a picture novella] / by Seth
    PN 6733 S48 I86 2015

    An Acknowledged Classic returns gorgeously re-designed.

    In his first graphic novel, It's a Good Life, if You Don't Weaken --a best-selling D & Q titles ever--Seth pays homage to the wit and sophistication of the old-fashioned magazine cartoon. While trying to understand his dissatisfaction with the present, Seth discovers the life and work of Kalo, a forgotten New Yorker cartoonist from the 1940s. But his obsession blinds him to the needs of his lover and the quiet desperation of his family. Wry self-reflection and moody colours characterize Seth's style in this tale about learning lessons from nostalgia. His playful and sophisticated experiment with memoir provoked a furious debate among cartoon historians and archivists about the existence of Kalo, and prompted a Details feature about Seth's "hoax".


  • Audionarratology : interfaces of sound and narrative / edited by Jarmila Mildorf and Till Kinzel
    P 96 N35 A84 2016eb

    Audionarratology is a new 'postclassical' narratology that explores interfaces of sound, voice, music and narrative in different media and across disciplinary boundaries. Drawing on sound studies and transmedial narratology, audionarratology combines concepts from both while also offering fresh insights. Sound studies investigate sound in its various manifestations from disciplinary angles as varied as anthropology, history, sociology, acoustics, articulatory phonetics, musicology or sound psychology. Still, a specifically narrative focus is often missing. Narratology has broadened its scope to look at narratives from transdisciplinary and transmedial perspectives. However, there is a bias towards visual or audio-visual media such as comics and graphic novels, film, TV, hyperfiction and pictorial art. The aim of this book is to foreground the oral and aural sides of storytelling, asking how sound, voice and music support narrative structure or even assume narrative functions in their own right. It brings together cutting-edge research on forms of sound narration hitherto neglected in narratology: radio plays, audiobooks, audio guides, mobile phone theatre, performance poetry, concept albums, digital stories, computer games, songs.


  • The Cambridge introduction to contemporary American fiction / Stacey Olster, Stony Brook University
    PS 379 O57 2017
    The Cambridge Introduction to Contemporary American Fiction explores fiction written over the last thirty years in the context of the profound political, historical, and cultural changes that have distinguished the contemporary period. Focusing on both established and emerging writers - and with chapters devoted to the American historical novel, regional realism, the American political novel, the end of the Cold War and globalization, 9/11, borderlands and border identities, race, and the legacy of postmodern aesthetics - this Introduction locates contemporary American fiction at the intersection of a specific time and long-standing traditions. In the process, it investigates the entire concept of what constitutes an "American" author while exploring the vexed, yet resilient, nature of what the concept of home has come to signify in so much writing today. This wide-ranging study will be invaluable to students, instructors, and general readers alike.

  • The global novel : writing the world in the 21st century / Adam Kirsch
    PN 710 K516 2016
    "Illuminating." - The New York Times Book Review
    Named one of "Ten Books to Read this April" by the BBC
    What is the future of fiction in an age of globalization?

    In The Global Novel , acclaimed literary critic Adam Kirsch explores some of the 21st century's best-known writers--including Orhan Pamuk, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohsin Hamid, Margaret Atwood, Haruki Murakami, Roberto Bolano, Elena Ferrante, and Michel Houellebecq. They are employing a way of imagining the world that sees different places and peoples as intimately connected. From climate change and sex trafficking to religious fundamentalism and genetic engineering, today's novelists use 21st-century subjects to address the perennial concerns of fiction, like morality, society, and love. The global novel is not the bland, deracinated, commercial product that many critics of world literature have accused it of being, but rather finds a way to renew the writer's ancient privilege of examining what it means to be human.

  • Shakespeare's legal ecologies : law and distributed selfhood / Kevin Curran
    PR 3028 C87 2017
    Shakespeare's Legal Ecologies offers the first sustained examination of the relationship between law and selfhood in Shakespeare's work. Taking five plays and the sonnets as case studies, Kevin Curran argues that law provided Shakespeare with the conceptual resources to imagine selfhood in social and distributed terms, as a product of interpersonal exchange or as a gathering of various material forces. In the course of these discussions, Curran reveals Shakespeare's distinctly communitarian vision of personal and political experience, the way he regarded living, thinking, and acting in the world as materially and socially embedded practices.

    At the center of the book is Shakespeare's fascination with questions that are fundamental to both law and philosophy: What are the sources of agency? What counts as a person? For whom am I responsible, and how far does that responsibility extend? What is truly mine? Curran guides readers through Shakespeare's responses to these questions, paying careful attention to both historical and intellectual contexts.

    The result is a book that advances a new theory of Shakespeare's imaginative relationship to law and an original account of law's role in the ethical work of his plays and sonnets. Readers interested in Shakespeare, theater and philosophy, law, and the history of ideas will find Shakespeare's Legal Ecologies to be an essential resource.

  • Willa Cather at the modernist crux / edited by Ann Moseley, John J. Murphy, and Robert Thacker
    PS 3505 A87 Z947 2017
    Willa Cather at the Modernist Crux examines Willa Cather's position in time, in aesthetics, and in the world. Born a Victorian in 1873, Cather made herself a modernist through the poems, stories, and novels she wrote and published into the twentieth century. Beginning with a prologue locating Cather's position, this volume of Cather Studies offers three sets of related essays.

    The first section takes up Cather's beginnings with her late nineteenth-century cultural influences. The second section explores a range of discernable direct connections with contemporary artists (Howard Pyle, Frederic Remington, and Ernest Blumenschein) and others who figured in the making of her texts. The third section focuses on The Song of the Lark , a novel that confirms Cather's shift westward and elaborates her emergent modernism. An epilogue by the editors of The Selected Letters of Willa Cather addresses how the recent availability of these letters has transformed Cather studies. Altogether, these essays detail Cather's shaping of the world of the early twentieth century and later into a singular modernism born of both inherited and newer cultural traditions.

  • Ms. Marvel. writer G. Willow Wilson ; artist, Adrian Alphona ; color artist, Ian Herring ; letterer, Joe Caramagna
    PN 6727 W56 M86 2014
    Marvel Comics presents the all-new Ms. Marvel, the ground breaking heroine that has become an international sensation! Kamala Khan is an ordinary girl from Jersey City until she is suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. But who truly is the all-new Ms. Marvel? Find out as she takes the Marvel Universe by storm! As Kamala discovers the dangers of her newfound powers, she unlocks a secret behind them as well. Is Kamala ready to wield these immense new gifts? It's history in the making from acclaimed writer G. Willow Wilson and beloved artist Adrian Alphona!

  • Les plaisirs et les jours : suivi de, L'indifférent et autres textes / Marcel Proust ; édition présentée, établie et annotée par Thierry Laget
    PQ 2631 R63 A6 1993

  • Ghost in the shell = Kōkaku kidōtai / story and art by Shirow Masamune ; translation by Frederik L. Schodt and Toren Smith ; lettering by Tom Orzechowski, Suzie Lee
    PN 6790 J33 S5713 2009
    Deep into the 21st century, the line between man and machine has been inexorably blurred as humans rely on the enhancement of mechanical implants and robots are upgraded with human tissue. In this rapidly converging technoscape, the covert-ops agents of Section 9 are charged to track and crack the most dangerous terrorists, cybercriminals and ghost hackers the digital future has to offer.

  • The lotus caves / John Christopher
    PZ 7 C457Lo 2014
    Two boys discover a series of caverns underneath their moon colony home in this futuristic story from the author of the Tripods series.

    Marty and Steve may live on the moon, but that doesn't mean they don't want to get away every once in a while. So when Steve makes the suggestion to skip school and take a lunar car out to explore the moon's surface like real astronauts, Marty thinks it's a great idea.

    But the fun quickly ends when the lunar car crashes, stranding Marty and Steve beneath the moon's surface.

    There, in a bizarre, cave, Marty and Steve find the unexpected: a world filled with various plants, food, and life...including a man who supposedly went missing more than one hundred years before. The boys think that they've found the most wonderful place in the galaxy...but they soon learn that the joy comes with a price. The strange creature that is keeping them alive also wants to control them, and when Marty and Steve decide that they want to leave, the creature might have something else in mind.

  • We / Yevgeny Zamyatin ; a new translation, with an introduction, by Natasha Randall
    PG 3476 Z34 M913 2006
    Translated by Natasha Randall
    Foreword by Bruce Sterling

    Written in 1921, We is set in the One State, where all live for the collective good and individual freedom does not exist. The novel takes the form of the diary of mathematician D-503, who, to his shock, experiences the most disruptive emotion imaginable: love. At once satirical and sobering--and now available in a powerful new translation-- We is both a rediscovered classic and a work of tremendous relevance to our own times.
page last updated on: Monday 22 January 2018
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