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Cinema - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range PN 1993 - PN 1999 (Cinema) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 90 days.


  • Cinema, state socialism and society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989 : re-visions / edited by Sanja Bahun and John Haynes
    PN 1995.9 S6 C54 2014

    This book presents a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era. It argues that, since the end of communism in these countries, film scholars are able to view these cinemas in a different way, no longer bound by an outlook relying on binary Cold War terms. With the opening of archives in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, much more is known about these states and societies; at the same time, the field has been reinvigorated by its opening up to more contemporary concepts, themes and approaches in film studies and adjacent disciplines. Taking stock of these developments, this book presents a rich, varied tapestry, relating specific films to specific national and transnational circumstances, rather than viewing them as a single, monolithic "Cold War Communist" cinema.


  • Australian screen in the 2000s / Mark David Ryan; Ben Goldsmith, editors
    PN 1993.5 A8 A977 2017eb

  • Adaptation, awards culture, and the value of prestige / Colleen Kennedy-Karpat, Eric Sandberg, editors
    PN1997.85

  • Representing religion in world cinema : filmmaking, mythmaking, culture making / edited by S. Brent Plate
    PN 1995.5 R47 2003eb
    Religious traditions have provided a seemingly endless supply of subject matter for film, from the Ten Commandments to the Mahabharata . At the same time, film production has engendered new religious practices and has altered existing ones, from the cult following of The Rocky Horror Picture Show to the 2001 Australian census in which 70,000 people indicated their religion to be 'Jedi Knight'. Representing Religion in World Cinema begins with these mutual transformations as the contributors query the two-way interrelations between film and religion across cinemas of the world. Cross-cultural and interdisciplinary by nature, this collection by an international group of scholars draws on work from religious studies, film studies, and anthropology, as well as theoretical impulses in performance, gender, ethnicity, colonialism, and postcolonialism.

  • Deleuze and cinema : the film concepts / Felicity Colman
    PN 1995 C621 2011
    No Marketing Blurb

  • Cinema against spectacle : technique and ideology revisited / by Jean-Louis Comolli ; translated and edited by Daniel Fairfax
    PN 1995 C623713 2015
    Jean-Louis Comolli's six-part essay "Technique and Ideology" had a revolutionary effect on film theory and history when it first appeared in Cahiers du Cin#65533;ma in 1971. In 2009, Comolli revisited his earlier text, arguing that the present age, marked by the total dominance of media-filtered spectacle over image production, makes the need for an "emancipated, critical spectator" more pressing than ever. This volume brings together annotated translations of these two texts to provide an overview of Comolli's activity as both a theorist and a filmmaker.

  • Film, art, and the third culture : a naturalized aesthetics of film / Murray Smith
    PN 1995 S5364 2017
    In the mid-1950s C.P. Snow began his campaign against the "two cultures" - the debilitating divide, as he saw it, between traditional "literary intellectual" culture, and the culture of the sciences, urging in its place a "third culture" which would draw upon and integrate the resources ofdisciplines spanning the natural and social sciences, the arts and the humanities. Murray Smith argues that, with the ever-increasing influence of evolutionary theory and neuroscience, and the pervasive presence of digital technologies, Snow's challenge is more relevant than ever. Working out how the "scientific" and everyday images of the world "hang" together is no simple matter. In Film, Art, and the Third Culture, Smith explores this question in relation to the art, technology, and science of film in particular, and to the world of the arts and aesthetic activity moregenerally. In the first part of his book, Smith explores the general strategies and principles necessary to build a "third cultural" or naturalized approach to film and art - one that roots itself in an appreciation of scientific knowledge and method. Smith then goes on to focus on the role ofemotion in film and the other arts, as an extended experiment in the "third cultural" integration of ideas on emotion spanning the arts, humanities and sciences. While acknowledging that not all of the questions we ask are scientific in nature, Smith contends that we cannot disregard the insightswrought by taking a naturalized approach to the aesthetics of film and the other arts.

  • The films of Roberto Rossellini / Peter Bondanella
    PN 1998.3 R67 B66 1993
    The Films of Roberto Rossellini traces the career of one of the most influential Italian filmmakers through close analysis of the seven films that mark important turning points in his evolution: The Man with a Cross (1943), Open City (1945), Paisan (1946), The Machine to Kill Bad People (1948-52), Voyage in Italy (1953), General della Rovere (1959) and The Rise to Power of Louis XIV (1966). Beginning with Rossellini's work within the fascist cinema, it discusses his invention of neorealism, a new cinematic style that resulted in several classics during the immediate postwar period. Almost immediately, however, Rossellini's continually evolving style moved beyond mere social realism to reveal other aspects of the camera's gaze, as is apparent in the films he made with Ingrid Bergman during the 1950s; though unpopular, these works had a tremendous impact on the French New Wave critics and directors. Rossellini's late career marks a return to his nonrealist period, now critically reexamined, in such works as the commercially successful General della Rovere, and his eventual turn to the creation of didactic films for television.

  • Semiotics and the analysis of film / Jean Mitry ; translated by Christopher King
    PN 1995 M54813 2000
    First published in France as La Semiologie en Question, this study has become a classic analysis of the value of semiotics in film analysis. a film-maker and theoretician, Mitry poses the question that if cinema is a language can it be understood thought the techniques of linguistic analysis? In effect, he interrogates semiology by representing its basic propositions and approaches, comparing them with scientific humanist aesthetics. Mitry's study ranges across film language, its syntax, grammar and code, signs an signification, montage, images, narrative structures, symbols and metaphors, and the rhythm of film.

  • Acting for film / Cathy Haase
    PN 1995.9 A26 H33 2003
    Aspiring film and television actors will discover exercises for relaxing the face to achieve maximum expressiveness; maintaining proper eye focus in front of the camera and conveying the "beats" of a scene, even in the shortest takes. They'll also learn tested techniques for adapting to the styles of different directors; modulating voice and breath for maximum effect; preparing for the first day on the set; enduring multiple takes and on-the-set waiting; and much, much more. For any performer who intends to make a living in front of the camera, Acting for Film is the most authoritative resource!

  • Napoleon : Abel Gance's classic film / Kevin Brownlow ; research collaborators, Bambi Ballard [and others]
    PN 1997 N3283 B77 2004
    No Marketing Blurb

  • Boats on the Marne : Jean Renoir's Critique of Modernity / Prakash Younger
    PN 1998.3 R46 Y68 2017eb

    Boats on the Marne offers an original interpretation of Jean Renoir's celebrated films of the 1930s, treating them as a coherent narrative of philosophical response to the social and political crises of the times. Grounded in a reinterpretation of the foundational film-philosopher André Bazin, and drawing on work from a range of disciplines (film studies, art history, comparative literature, political and cultural history), the book's coordinated consideration of Renoir's films, writings, and interviews demonstrates his obsession with the concept of romanticism. Renoir saw romanticism to be a defining feature of modernity, a hydra-headed malady which intimately shapes our personal lives, culture, and politics, blinding us and locking us into agonistic relationships and conflict. While mapping the popular manifestations of romanticism that Renoir engaged with at the time, this study restores the philosophic weight of his critique by tracing the phenomenon back to its roots in the work and influence of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who first articulated conceptions of human desire, identity, community, and history that remain pervasive today. Prakash Younger argues that Renoir's films of the 1930s articulate a multi-stranded narrative through which the director thinks about various aspects of romanticism and explores the liberating possibilities of an alternative paradigm illuminated by the thought of Plato, Montaigne, and the early Enlightenment. When placed in the context of the long and complex dialogue Renoir had with his audience over the course of the decade, masterpieces such as La Grande Illusion and La Règle du Jeu reveal his profound engagement with issues of political philosophy that are still very much with us today.


  • Addicted to Rehab : Race, Gender, and Drugs in the Era of Mass Incarceration / Valerie K. Orlando
    PN 1993.5 A35 O75 2017eb
    New African Cinema examines the pressing social, cultural, economic, and historical issues explored by African filmmakers from the early post-colonial years into the new millennium. Offering an overview of the development of postcolonial African cinema since the 1960s, Val#65533;rie K. Orlando highlights the variations in content and themes that reflect the socio-cultural and political environments of filmmakers and the cultures they depict in their films.

    Orlando illuminates the diverse themes evident in the works of filmmakers such as Ousmane Semb#65533;ne's Ceddo (Senegal, 1977), Sarah Maldoror's Sambizanga (Angola, 1972), Assia Djebar's La Nouba des femmes de Mont Chenoua (The Circle of women of Mount Chenoua, Algeria, 1978), Z#65533;z#65533; Gamboa's The Hero (Angola, 2004) and Abderrahmane Sissako's Timbuktu (Mauritania, 2014), among others. Orlando also considers the influence of major African film schools and their traditions, as well as European and American influences on the marketing and distribution of African film. For those familiar with the polemics of African film, or new to them, Orlando offers a cogent analytical approach that is engaging.

  • Six Turkish Filmmakers / Laurence Raw
    PN 1993.5 T8 R39 2017eb

  • Michael Curtiz : A Life in Film / Alan K. Rode
    PN 1998.3 C87 R65 2017eb

    Academy Award--winning director Michael Curtiz (1886--1962) -- whose best-known films include Casablanca (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Mildred Pierce (1945) and White Christmas (1954) -- was in many ways the anti-auteur. During his unprecedented twenty-seven year tenure at Warner Bros., he directed swashbuckling adventures, westerns, musicals, war epics, romances, historical dramas, horror films, tearjerkers, melodramas, comedies, and film noir masterpieces. The director's staggering output of 180 films surpasses that of the legendary John Ford and exceeds the combined total of films directed by George Cukor, Victor Fleming, and Howard Hawks.

    In the first biography of this colorful, instinctual artist, Alan K. Rode illuminates the life and work of one of the film industry's most complex figures. He begins by exploring the director's early life and career in his native Hungary, revealing how Curtiz shaped the earliest days of silent cinema in Europe as he acted in, produced, and directed scores of films before immigrating to the United States in 1926. In Hollywood, Curtiz earned a reputation for his explosive tantrums, his difficulty communicating in English, and his disregard for the well-being of others. However, few directors elicited more memorable portrayals from their casts, and ten different actors delivered Oscar-nominated performances under his direction.

    In addition to his study of the director's remarkable legacy, Rode investigates Curtiz's dramatic personal life, discussing his enduring creative partnership with his wife, screenwriter Bess Meredyth, as well as his numerous affairs and children born of his extramarital relationships. This meticulously researched biography provides a nuanced understanding of one of the most talented filmmakers of Hollywood's golden age.


  • Producer of Controversy : Stanley Kramer, Hollywood Liberalism, and the Cold War / Jennifer Frost
    PN 1998.3 K73 F76 2017eb
    With films ranging from High Noon to Guess Who's Coming to Dinner , Stanley Kramer (1913-2001) was one of the most successful and prolific director-producers of his day. But even as critics praised his courage in taking on such issues as nuclear war, racism, fascism, and the battle between science and religion, others condemned his work as "emptily pretentious" and "hollow, falsely sentimental, overproduced." Whether Kramer was "one of the great filmmakers of all time" (Kevin Spacey at the Golden Globe Awards) or "one of Hollywood's worst directors" (preeminent film critic Andrew Sarris in The Village Voice ), he had a strong and undeniable influence on American culture during the Cold War. Producer of Controversy is the first book to take a close-up look at Kramer's career, films, and liberal politics in an effort to explain his contributions and historical significance.

    Kramer learned filmmaking within the old studio system, but over a career spanning forty years he did much to shape the independent moviemaking that emerged after World War II. Jennifer Frost pays particular attention to four of his key "message movies"-- The Defiant Ones , On the Beach , Inherit the Wind , and Judgment at Nuremberg --to show how Kramer's controversial films opened up public debate about the most important issues of his time--among average filmgoers as well as professional critics, political commentators, and public figures. In this context, she for the first time fully documents the Hollywood Right's attacks on Kramer in the 1950s; details his resistance to the anticommunist Red Scare and the Hollywood blacklist; exposes his role as a cultural diplomat with the Soviet Union; and reveals his important contribution to the liberal and radical politics of the 1960s. Her book is at once an absorbing work of cultural history and a thoroughgoing reassessment of Stanley Kramer's place in the pantheon of American filmmakers.

  • Silver Screen, Hasidic Jews : The Story of an Image / Shaina Hammerman
    PN 1995.9 J46 H36 2018eb

    Motivated by Woody Allen's brief comedic transformation into a Hasidic Jew in Annie Hall, cultural historian Shaina Hammerman examines the effects of real and imagined representations of Hasidic Jews in film, television, theater, and photography. Although these depictions could easily be dismissed as slapstick comedies and sexy dramas about forbidden relationships, Hammerman uses this ethnic imagery to ask meaningful questions about how Jewish identity, multiculturalism, belonging, and relevance are constructed on the stage and silver screen.


  • For the Love of Cinema : Teaching Our Passion In and Outside the Classroom / edited by Rashna Wadia Richards and David T. Johnson
    PN 1993.7 F675 2017eb

    What role does love--of cinema, of cinema studies, of teaching and learning--play in teaching film? For the Love of Cinema brings together a wide range of film scholars to explore the relationship between cinephilia and pedagogy. All of them ask whether cine-love can inform the serious study of cinema. Chapter by chapter, writers approach this question from various perspectives: some draw on aspects of students' love of cinema as a starting point for rethinking familiar films or generating new kinds of analyses about the medium itself; others reflect on how their own cinephilia informs the way they teach cinema; and still others offer new ways of writing (both verbally and audiovisually) with a love of cinema in the age of new media. Together, they form a collection that is as much a guide for teaching cinephilia as it is an energetic dialogue about the ways that cinephilia and pedagogy enliven and rejuvenate one another.


  • Ishiro Honda : A Life in Film, from Godzilla to Kurosawa / Steve Ryfle and Ed Godziszewski ; with Yuuko Honda-Yun ; preface by Martin Scorsese
    PN 1998.3 H68 R94 2017eb
    Ishiro Honda was arguably the most internationally successful Japanese director of his generation, with an unmatched succession of science fiction films that were commercial hits worldwide. From the atomic allegory of Godzilla and the beguiling charms of Mothra to the tragic mystery of Matango and the disaster and spectacle of Rodan, The Mysterians, King Kong vs. Godzilla, and many others, Honda's films reflected postwar Japan's real-life anxieties and incorporated fantastical special effects, a formula that appealed to audiences around the globe and created a popular culture phenomenon that spans generations. Now, in the first full account of this long overlooked director's life and career, authors Steve Ryfle and Ed Godziszewski shed new light on Honda's work and the experiences that shaped it--including his days as a reluctant Japanese soldier, witnessing the aftermath of Hiroshima, and his lifelong friendship with Akira Kurosawa. Ishiro Honda: A Life in Film, from Godzilla to Kurosawa features close analysis of Honda's films (including, for the first time, his rarely seen dramas, comedies, and war films) and draws on previously untapped documents and interviews to explore how creative, economic, and industrial factors impacted his career. Fans of Honda, Godzilla, and tokusatsu (special effects) film, and of Japanese film in general, will welcome this in-depth study of a highly influential director who occupies a uniquely important position in science fiction and fantasy cinema, as well as in world cinema.

    Together, the authors have provided audio commentary tracks and produced supplemental material for numerous home video releases, including Ishiro Honda's Godzilla for the British Film Institute. They co-produced the documentary feature Bringing Godzilla Down to Size (2008).

  • Agnes Varda between Film, Photography, and Art / Rebecca J. DeRoo
    PN 1998.3 V368 D47 2018eb
    Agnès Varda is a prolific film director, photographer, and artist whose cinematic career spans more than six decades. Today she is best known as the innovative "mother" of the French New Wave film movement of the 1950s and '60s and for her multimedia art exhibitions. Varying her use of different media, she is a figure who defies easy categorization. In this extensively researched book, Rebecca J. DeRoo demonstrates how Varda draws upon the histories of art, photography, and film to complicate the overt narratives in her works and to advance contemporary cultural politics. Based on interviews with Varda and unparalleled access to Varda's archives, this interdisciplinary study constructs new frameworks for understanding one of the most versatile talents in twentieth and twenty-first century culture.

  • Charles Burnett : A Cinema of Symbolic Knowledge / James Naremore
    PN 1998.3 B865 N37 2017eb
    In the first book devoted to Charles Burnett, a crucial figure in the history of American cinema often regarded as the most influential member of the L.A. Rebellion group of African American filmmakers, James Naremore provides a close critical study of all Burnett's major pictures for movies and television, including Killer of Sheep , To Sleep with Anger , The Glass Shield , Nightjohn , The Wedding , Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property , and Warming by the Devil's Fire . Having accessed new information and rarely seen material, Naremore shows that Burnett's career has developed against the odds and that his artistry, social criticism, humor, and commitment to what he calls "symbolic knowledge" have given his work enduring value for American culture.

  • Screening the Stage : Case Studies of Film Adaptations of Stage Plays and Musicals in the Classical Hollywood Era, 1914-1956 / Steve Neale
    PN 1997.85 M437 2017eb

    Introduced by a comprehensive account of the factors governing the adaptation of stage plays and musicals in Hollywood from the early 1910s to the mid-to-late 1950s, Screening the Stage consists of a series of chapter-length studies of feature-length films, the plays and musicals on which they were based, and their remakes where pertinent. Founded on an awareness of evolving technologies and industrial practices rather than the tenets of adaptation theory, particular attention is paid to the evolving practices of Hollywood as well as to the purport and structure of the plays and stage musicals on which the film versions were based. Each play or musical is contextualized and summarized in detail, and each film is analyzed so as to pinpoint the ways in which they articulate, modify, or rework the former. Examples range from dramas, comedies, melodramas, musicals, operettas, thrillers, westerns and war film, and include The Squaw Man, The Poor Little Rich Girl, The Merry Widow, 7th Heaven, The Cocoanuts, Waterloo Bridge, Stage Door, I Remember Mama, The Pirate, Dial M for Murder and Attack.


  • Lewd Looks : American Sexploitation Cinema in the 1960s / Elena Gorfinkel
    PN 1995.9 S45 G67 2017eb

    One of the most fascinating phenomena of 1960s film culture is the emergence of American sexploitation films--salacious indies made on the margins of Hollywood. Hundreds of such films were produced and shown on both urban and small-town screens over the course of the decade. Yet despite their vital importance to the film scene, and though they are now understood as a gateway to the emergence of publicly exhibited hardcore pornography in the early 1970s, these films have been largely overlooked by scholars.

    Defined by low budgets, quick production times, unknown actors, strategic uses of nudity, and a sensationalist obsession with unbridled female sexuality, sexploitation films provide a unique window into a tumultuous period in American culture and sexual politics. In Lewd Looks , Elena Gorfinkel examines the social and legal developments that made sexploitation films possible: their aesthetics, their regulation, and their audiences. Gorfinkel explores the ways sexploitation films changed how spectators encountered and made sense of the sexualized body and set the stage for the adult film industry of today.

    Lewd Looks recovers a lost chapter in the history of independent cinema and American culture--a subject that will engross readers interested in media, sexuality, gender, and the 1960s. Gorfinkel investigates the films and their contexts with scholarly depth and vivid storytelling, producing a new account of the obscene image, screen sex, and adult film and media.


  • Not According to Plan : Filmmaking under Stalin / Maria Belodubrovskaya
    PN 1993.5 R9 B385 2017eb

    In Not According to Plan , Maria Belodubrovskaya reveals the limits on the power of even the most repressive totalitarian regimes to create and control propaganda. Belodubrovskaya's revisionist account of Soviet filmmaking between 1930 and 1953 highlights the extent to which the Soviet film industry remained stubbornly artisanal in its methods, especially in contrast to the more industrial approach of the Hollywood studio system. Not According to Plan shows that even though Josef Stalin recognized cinema as a "mighty instrument of mass agitation and propaganda" and strove to harness the Soviet film industry to serve the state, directors such as Eisenstein, Alexandrov, and Pudovkin had far more creative control than did party-appointed executives and censors.

    The Stalinist party-state, despite explicit intent and grandiose plans to build a "Soviet Hollywood" that would release a thousand features per year, failed to construct even a modest mass propaganda cinema. Belodubrovskaya's wealth of evidence shows that the regime's desire to disseminate propaganda on a vast scale was consistently at odds with its compulsion to control quality and with Stalin's intolerance of imperfection. Not According to Plan is a landmark in Soviet cultural history and the global history of cinema.


  • New African Cinema / Valerie K. Orlando
    PN 1993.5 A35 O75 2017eb
    After decades of the American "war on drugs" and relentless prison expansion, political officials are finally challenging mass incarceration. Many point to an apparently promising solution to reduce the prison population: addiction treatment.

    In Addicted to Rehab , Bard College sociologist Allison McKim gives an in-depth and innovative ethnographic account of two such rehab programs for women, one located in the criminal justice system and one located in the private healthcare system--two very different ways of defining and treating addiction. McKim's book shows how addiction rehab reflects the race, class, and gender politics of the punitive turn. As a result, addiction has become a racialized category that has reorganized the link between punishment and welfare provision. While reformers hope that treatment will offer an alternative to punishment and help women, McKim argues that the framework of addiction further stigmatizes criminalized women and undermines our capacity to challenge gendered subordination. Her study ultimately reveals a two-tiered system, bifurcated by race and class.

  • Film, Fashion, and the 1960s / edited by Eugenia Paulicelli, Drake Stutesman, and Louise Wallenberg
    PN 1995.9 C56 F545 2017eb

    A fascinating look at one of the most experimental, volatile, and influential decades, Film, Fashion, and the 1960s, examines the numerous ways in which film and fashion intersected and affected identity expression during the era. From A Hard Day's Night to Breakfast at Tiffany's, from the works of Ingmar Bergman to Blake Edwards, the groundbreaking cinema of the 1960s often used fashion as the ultimate expression for urbanity, youth, and political (un)awareness. Crumbling hierarchies brought together previously separate cultural domains, and these blurred boundaries could be seen in unisex fashions and roles played out on the silver screen. As this volume amply demonstrates, fashion in films from Italy, France, England, Sweden, India, and the United States helped portray the rapidly changing faces of this cultural avant-gardism. This blending of fashion and film ultimately created a new aesthetic that continues to influence the fashion and media of today.


  • You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet : Interviews with Stars from Hollywood's Golden Era / James Bawden and Ron Miller
    PN 1998.2 Y67 2017eb

    Journalists James Bawden and Ron Miller spent their careers interviewing the greatest stars of Hollywood's golden age. They visited Lee Marvin at home and politely admired his fishing trophies, chatted with Janet Leigh while a young Jamie Lee Curtis played, and even made Elizabeth Taylor laugh out loud.

    In You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet, Bawden and Miller return with a new collection of rare interviews with iconic film stars including Henry Fonda, Esther Williams, Buster Keaton, Maureen O'Sullivan, Walter Pidgeon, and many more. The book is filled with humorous anecdotes and incredible behind-the-scenes stories. For instance, Bette Davis reflects that she and Katharine Hepburn were both considered for the role of Scarlett O'Hara but neither was "gorgeous enough" for the part; Janet Leigh analyzes the famous shower scene in Psycho (1960), which was shot in seven days and gave the actress nightmares for years; and Jimmy Stewart describes Alfred Hitchcock as a "strange, roly-poly man, interested only in blondes and murder." Popular horror film stars from Lon Chaney Jr. to Boris Karloff and Vincent Price are also featured in a special "movie monsters" section.

    With first-person accounts of Hollywood life from some of the most distinguished luminaries in the history of American cinema, this entertaining book will delight classic movie fans.


  • Wes Anderson / by Donna Kornhaber
    PN 1998.3 A526 K67 2017eb

  • Cosmopolitan Film Cultures in Latin America, 1896-1960 / edited by Rielle Navitski and Nicolas Poppe
    PN 1993.5 L3 C68 2017eb

    Cosmopolitan Film Cultures in Latin America examines how cinema forged cultural connections between Latin American publics and film-exporting nations in the first half of the twentieth century. Predating today's transnational media industries by several decades, these connections were defined by active economic and cultural exchanges, as well as longstanding inequalities in political power and cultural capital. The essays explore the arrival and expansion of cinema throughout the region, from the first screenings of the Lumière Cinématographe in 1896 to the emergence of new forms of cinephilia and cult spectatorship in the 1940s and beyond. Examining these transnational exchanges through the lens of the cosmopolitan, which emphasizes the ethical and political dimensions of cultural consumption, illuminates the role played by moving images in negotiating between the local, national, and global, and between the popular and the elite in twentieth-century Latin America. In addition, primary historical documents provide vivid accounts of Latin American film critics, movie audiences, and film industry workers' experiences with moving images produced elsewhere, encounters that were deeply rooted in the local context, yet also opened out onto global horizons.


  • Martial Arts Cinema and Hong Kong Modernity : Aesthetics, Representation, Circulation / Man-Fung Yip
    PN 1995.9 H3 Y576 2017eb

  • The Cinema of the Soviet Thaw : Space, Materiality, Movement / Lida Oukaderova
    PN 1993.5 S65 O85 2017eb

    Following Joseph Stalin's death in 1953, the Soviet Union experienced a dramatic resurgence in cinematic production. The period of the Soviet Thaw became known for its relative political and cultural liberalization; its films, formally innovative and socially engaged, were swept to the center of international cinematic discourse. In The Cinema of the Soviet Thaw, Lida Oukaderova provides an in-depth analysis of several Soviet films made between 1958 and 1967 to argue for the centrality of space--as both filmic trope and social concern--to Thaw-era cinema. Opening with a discussion of the USSR's little-examined late-fifties embrace of panoramic cinema, the book pursues close readings of films by Mikhail Kalatozov, Georgii Danelia, Larisa Shepitko and Kira Muratova, among others. It demonstrates that these directors' works were motivated by an urge to interrogate and reanimate spatial experience, and through this project to probe critical issues of ideology, social progress, and subjectivity within post-Stalinist culture.


  • Imperial Affects : Sensational Melodrama and the Attractions of American Cinema / Jonna Eagle
    PN 1995.9 A3 E24 2017eb
    Imperial Affects is the first sustained account of American action-based cinema as melodrama. From the earliest war films through the Hollywood Western and the late-century action cinema, imperialist violence and mobility have been produced as sites of both visceral pleasure and moral virtue. Suffering and omnipotence operate as twinned affects in this context, inviting identification with an American national subject constituted as both victimized and invincible--a powerful and persistent conjunction traced here across a century of cinema.

  • Visions of Avant-Garde Film : Polish Cinematic Experiments from Expressionism to Constructivism / Kamila Kuc
    PN 1995.9 E96 K83 2016eb

    Warsaw- and London-based filmmakers Franciszka and Stefan Themerson are often recognized internationally as pioneers of the 1930s Polish avant-garde. Yet, from the turn of the century to the end of the 1920s, Poland's literary and art scenes were also producing a rich array of criticism and early experiments with the moving image that set the stage for later developments in the avant-garde. In this comprehensive and accessible study, Kamila Kuc draws on myriad undiscovered archival sources to tell the history of early Polish avant-garde movements--Symbolism, Expressionism, Futurism, and Constructivism--and to reveal their impact on later practices in art cinema.


  • Movie Comics : Page to Screen/Screen to Page / Blair Davis
    PN 1995.9 C36 D38 2017eb
    As Christopher Nolan's Batman films and releases from the Marvel Cinematic Universe have regularly topped the box office charts, fans and critics alike might assume that the "comic book movie" is a distinctly twenty-first-century form. Yet adaptations of comics have been an integral part of American cinema from its very inception, with comics characters regularly leaping from the page to the screen and cinematic icons spawning comics of their own. Movie Comics is the first book to study the long history of both comics-to-film and film-to-comics adaptations, covering everything from silent films starring Happy Hooligan to sound films and serials featuring Dick Tracy and Superman to comic books starring John Wayne, Gene Autry, Bob Hope, Abbott & Costello, Alan Ladd, and Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. With a special focus on the Classical Hollywood era, Blair Davis investigates the factors that spurred this media convergence, as the film and comics industries joined forces to expand the reach of their various brands. While analyzing this production history, he also tracks the artistic coevolution of films and comics, considering the many formal elements that each medium adopted and adapted from the other. As it explores our abiding desire to experience the same characters and stories in multiple forms, Movie Comics gives readers a new appreciation for the unique qualities of the illustrated page and the cinematic moving image.

  • Showman of the Screen : Joseph E. Levine and His Revolutions in Film Promotion / A.T. McKenna
    PN 1998.3 L4655 M35 2016eb

    Short, immaculately dressed, and shockingly foul-mouthed, Joseph E. Levine (1905--1987) was larger than life. He rose from poverty in Boston's West End to become one of postwar Hollywood's most prolific independent promoters, distributors, and producers. Alternately respected and reviled, this master of movie promotion was responsible for bringing films as varied as Godzilla: King of the Monsters! (1956), Hercules (1958), The Graduate (1967), The Lion in Winter (1968), and A Bridge Too Far (1977) to American audiences .

    In the first biography of this controversial pioneer, A. T. McKenna traces Levine's rise as an influential packager of popular culture. He explores the mogul's pivotal role in many significant industry innovations from the 1950s to the 1970s, examining his use of saturation release tactics and bombastic advertising campaigns. Levine was also a trailblazer in promoting European art house cinema in the 1960s. He made Federico Fellini's 8½ (1963) a hit in America, feuded with Jean-Luc Godard over their production of Contempt (1963), and campaigned aggressively for Sophia Loren to become the first actress to win an Oscar for a foreign language performance for her role in Two Women (1960).

    Despite his significant accomplishments and prominent role in shaping film distribution and promotion in the post-studio era, Levine is largely overlooked today. McKenna's in-depth biography corrects misunderstandings and misinformation about this colorful figure, and offers a sober assessment of his contributions to world cinema. It also illuminates Levine's peculiar talent for movie- and self-promotion, as well as his extraordinary career in the motion picture business.


  • Michael Haneke : The Intermedial Void / Christopher Rowe
    PN 1998.3 H36 R56 2017eb

  • Escape Velocity : American Science Fiction Film, 1950-1982 / Bradley Schauer
    PN 1995.9 S26 S25 2016eb
    Today, movie theaters are packed with audiences of all ages marveling to exciting science fiction blockbusters, many of which are also critically acclaimed. However, when the science fiction film genre first emerged in the 1950s, it was represented largely by exploitation horror films--lurid, culturally disreputable, and appealing to a niche audience of children and sci-fi buffs. How did the genre evolve from B-movie to blockbuster? Escape Velocity charts the historical trajectory of American science fiction cinema, explaining how the genre transitioned from eerie low-budget horror like It Came from Outer Space to art films like Slaughterhouse-Five, and finally to the extraordinary popularity of hits like E.T. Bradley Schauer draws on primary sources such as internal studio documents, promotional materials, and film reviews to explain the process of cultural, aesthetic, and economic legitimation that occurred between the 1950s and 1980s, as pulp science fiction tropes were adapted to suit the tastes of mainstream audiences. Considering the inescapable dominance of today's effects-driven blockbusters, Escape Velocity not only charts the history of science fiction film, but also gives an account of the origins of contemporary Hollywood.

  • Hollywood's Hawaii : Race, Nation, and War / Delia Malia Caparoso Konzett
    PN 1995.9 H38 K66 2017eb
    Whether presented as exotic fantasy, a strategic location during World War II, or a site combining postwar leisure with military culture, Hawaii and the South Pacific figure prominently in the U.S. national imagination. Hollywood's Hawaii is the first full-length study of the film industry's intense engagement with the Pacific region from 1898 to the present.

    Delia Malia Caparoso Konzett highlights films that mirror the cultural and political climate of the country over more than a century--from the era of U.S. imperialism on through Jim Crow racial segregation, the attack on Pearl Harbor and WWII, the civil rights movement, the contemporary articulation of consumer and leisure culture, as well as the buildup of the modern military industrial complex. Focusing on important cultural questions pertaining to race, nationhood, and war, Konzett offers a unique view of Hollywood film history produced about the national periphery for mainland U.S. audiences. Hollywood's Hawaii presents a history of cinema that examines Hawaii and the Pacific and its representations in film in the context of colonialism, war, Orientalism, occupation, military buildup, and entertainment.

  • Reel Inequality : Hollywood Actors and Racism / Nancy Wang Yuen
    PN 1995.9 M56 Y83 2016eb
    When the 2016 Oscar acting nominations all went to whites for the second consecutive year, #OscarsSoWhite became a trending topic. Yet these enduring racial biases afflict not only the Academy Awards, but also Hollywood as a whole. Why do actors of color, despite exhibiting talent and bankability, continue to lag behind white actors in presence and prominence? Reel Inequality examines the structural barriers minority actors face in Hollywood, while shedding light on how they survive in a racist industry. The book charts how white male gatekeepers dominate Hollywood, breeding a culture of ethnocentric storytelling and casting. Nancy Wang Yuen interviewed nearly a hundred working actors and drew on published interviews with celebrities, such as Viola Davis, Chris Rock, Gina Rodriguez, Oscar Isaac, Lucy Liu, and Ken Jeong, to explore how racial stereotypes categorize and constrain actors. Their stories reveal the day-to-day racism actors of color experience in talent agents' offices, at auditions, and on sets. Yuen also exposes sexist hiring and programming practices, highlighting the structural inequalities that actors of color, particularly women, continue to face in Hollywood.
    This book not only conveys the harsh realities of racial inequality in Hollywood, but also provides vital insights from actors who have succeeded on their own terms, whether by sidestepping the system or subverting it from within. Considering how their struggles impact real-world attitudes about race and diversity, Reel Inequality follows actors of color as they suffer, strive, and thrive in Hollywood.

  • My Life as a Filmmaker / Yamamoto Satsuo ; translated, annotated and with an introduction by Chia-ning Chang
    PN 1998.3 Y36 A3 2017eb

  • Sonic Space in Djibril Diop Mambety's Films / Vlad Dima
    PN 1998.3 D56 D56 2017eb

    The art of Senegalese director Djibril Diop Mambety's cinema lies in the tension created between the visual narrative and the aural narrative. His work has been considered hugely influential, and his films bridge Western practices of filmmaking and oral traditions from West Africa. Mambety's film Touki Bouki is considered one of the foundational works of African cinema. Vlad Dima proposes a new reading of Mambety's entire filmography from the perspective of sound. Following recent analytical patterns in film studies that challenge the primacy of the visual, Dima claims that Mambety uses voices, noise, and silence as narrative tools that generate their own stories and sonic spaces. By turning an ear to cinema, Dima pushes African aesthetics to the foreground of artistic creativity and focuses on the critical importance of sound in world cinema.


  • The Extraordinary Image : Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and the Reimagining of Cinema / Robert P. Kolker
    PN 1993.5 U6 K58 2016eb
    Welles. Hitchcock. Kubrick. These names appear on nearly every list of the all-time greatest filmmakers. But what makes these directors so great? Despite their very different themes and sensibilities, is there a common genius that unites them and elevates their work into the realm of the sublime? The Extraordinary Image takes readers on a fascinating journey through the lives and films of these three directors, identifying the qualities that made them cinematic visionaries. Reflecting on a lifetime of teaching and writing on these filmmakers, acclaimed film scholar Robert P. Kolker offers a deeply personal set of insights on three artists who have changed the way he understands movies. Spotlighting the many astonishing images and stories in films by Welles, Hitchcock, Kubrick, he also considers how they induce a state of amazement that transports and transforms the viewer. Kolker's accessible prose invites readers to share in his own continued fascination and delight at these directors' visual inventiveness, even as he lends his expertise to help us appreciate the key distinctions between the unique cinematic universes they each created. More than just a celebration of three cinematic geniuses, The Extraordinary Image is an exploration of how movies work, what they mean, and why they bring us so much pleasure.

  • Beyond Blaxploitation / edited by Novotny Lawrence and Gerald R. Butters, Jr
    PN 1995.9 N4 B435 2016eb
    Beyond Blaxploitation, the first book-length anthology of scholarly work on blaxploitation film, sustains the momentum that blaxploitation scholarship has recently gained, giving the films an even more prominent place in cinema history. This volume is made up of eleven essays employing historical and theoretical methodologies in the examination of spectatorship, marketing, melodrama, the transition of novel to screenplay, and racial politics and identity, among other significant topics. In doing so, the book fills a substantial gap that exists in the black cinematic narrative and, more broadly, in film history. Beyond Blaxploitation is divided into three sections that feature original essays on a variety of canonical blaxploitation films and others that either influenced the movement or in some form represent a significant extension of it. The first section titled, "From Pioneer to Precursor to Blaxploitation," centers on three films-- Cotton Comes to Harlem , Watermelon Man , and Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song --that ignited the African American film cycle. The second section, "The Canon and the Not so Canon," is dedicated to forging alternative considerations of some of the most highly regarded blaxploitation films, while also bringing attention to lesser-known films in the movement. The final section, "Was, Is, or Isn't Blaxploitation," includes four essays that offer significant insights on films that are generally associated with blaxploitation but contest traditional definitions of the movement. Moreover, this section features chapters that address industrial factors that led to the creation of blaxploitation cinema and highlight the limitations of the term itself. Beyond Blaxploitation is a much-needed pedagogical tool, informing film scholars, critics, and fans alike, about blaxploitation's richness and complexity.

  • Zombie Cinema / Ian Olney
    PN 1995.9 Z63 O46 2017eb
    It's official: the zombie apocalypse is here. The living dead have been lurking in popular culture since the 1930s, but they have never been as ubiquitous or as widely-embraced as they are today.

    Zombie Cinema is a lively and accessible introduction to this massively popular genre. Presenting a historical overview of zombie appearances in cinema and on television, Ian Olney also considers why, more than any other horror movie monster, zombies have captured the imagination of twenty-first-century audiences.

    Surveying the landmarks of zombie film and TV, from White Zombie to The Walking Dead , the book also offers unique insight into why zombies have gone global, spreading well beyond the borders of American and European cinema to turn up in films from countries as far-flung as Cuba, India, Japan, New Zealand, and Nigeria. Both fun and thought-provoking, Zombie Cinema will give readers a new perspective on our ravenous hunger for the living dead.


  • Cristi Puiu / by Monica Filimon
    PN 1998.3 P8535 F55 2017eb

  • Introduction to Documentary, Third Edition / Bill Nichols
    PN 1995.9 D6 N539 2017eb

    The third edition of Bill Nichols's best-selling text provides an up-to-date introduction to the most important issues in documentary history and criticism. A new chapter, "I Want to Make a Documentary: Where Do I Start?" guides readers through the steps of planning and preproduction and includes an example of a project proposal for a film that went on to win awards at major festivals. Designed for students in any field that makes use of visual evidence and persuasive strategies, Introduction to Documentary identifies the genre's distinguishing qualities and teaches the viewer how to read documentary film. Each chapter takes up a discrete question, from "How did documentary filmmaking get started?" to "Why are ethical issues central to documentary filmmaking?" Here Nichols has fully rewritten each chapter for greater clarity and ease of use, including revised discussions of earlier films and new commentary on dozens of recent films from The Cove to The Act of Killing and from Gasland to Restrepo.


  • Film as Cultural Artifact : Religious Criticism of World Cinema / Mathew P. John
    PN 1995.5 J654 2017eb

  • The Red and the Black : American Film Noir in the 1950s / Robert Miklitsch
    PN 1995.9 F54 M545 2016eb

  • Sociology on Film : Postwar Hollywood's Prestige Commodity / Chris Cagle
    PN 1995.9 S62 C35 2016eb
    After World War II, Hollywood's "social problem films"--tackling topical issues that included racism, crime, mental illness, and drug abuse--were hits with critics and general moviegoers alike. In an era of film famed for its reliance on pop psychology, these movies were a form of popular sociology, bringing the academic discipline's concerns to a much broader audience. Sociology on Film examines how the postwar "problem film" translated contemporary policy debates and intellectual discussions into cinematic form in order to become one of the preeminent genres of prestige drama. Chris Cagle chronicles how these movies were often politically fractious, the work of progressive directors and screenwriters who drew scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet he also proposes that the genre helped to construct an abstract discourse of "society" that served to unify a middlebrow American audience. As he considers the many forms of print media that served to inspire social problem films, including journalism, realist novels, and sociological texts, Cagle also explores their distinctive cinematic aesthetics. Through a close analysis of films like Gentleman's Agreement , The Lost Weekend , and Intruder in the Dust , he presents a compelling case that the visual style of these films was intimately connected to their more expressly political and sociological aspirations. Sociology on Film demonstrates how the social problem picture both shaped and reflected the middle-class viewer's national self-image, making a lasting impact on Hollywood's aesthetic direction.

  • Truffaut on Cinema / compiled by Anne Gillain ; translated by Alistair Fox
    PN 1998.3 T78 A5 2017eb

    Between 1959 and 1984, French film director François Truffaut was interviewed over three hundred times. Each interview offers critical insight into the genesis of Truffaut's films as he shares the sources of his inspiration, the choice of his themes, and the development of his screenplays. In addition, Truffaut discusses his relationships with collaborators, actors, and the circumstances surrounding the shooting of each film. These texts, originally assembled by Anne Gillain and published in French in 1988, are presented here in a montage arranged chronologically by film. This compilation includes an impressive array of reflections on cinema as an art form. Truffaut defines the aims and practices of the French New Wave, comparing their efforts to the films made by their predecessors and including comments that encompass the entire history of cinema. Truffaut on Cinema provides commentary on contemporary events, a wealth of biographical information, and Truffaut's own artistic itinerary.


  • Violence in the Films of Alfred Hitchcock : A Study in Mimesis / David Humbert
    PN 1998.3 H58 H86 2017eb
    Parting ways with the Freudian and Lacanian readings that have dominated recent scholarly understanding of Hitchcock, David Humbert examines the roots of violence in the director's narratives and finds them not in human sexuality but in mimesis. Through an analysis of seven key films, he argues that Girard's model of mimetic desire--desire oriented by imitation of and competition with others--best explains a variety of well-recognized themes, including the MacGuffin, the double, the innocent victim, the wrong man, the transfer of guilt, and the scapegoat. This study will appeal not only to Hitchcock fans and film scholars but also to those interested in Freud and Girard and their competing theories of desire.

  • The Invention of Robert Bresson : The Auteur and His Market / Colin Burnett
    PN 1998.3 B755 B87 2017eb

    Challenging the prevailing notion among cinephiles that the auteur is an isolated genius interested primarily in individualism, Colin Burnett positions Robert Bresson as one whose life's work confronts the cultural forces that helped shape it. Regarded as one of film history's most elusive figures, Bresson (1901-1999) carried himself as an auteur long before cultural magazines, like the famed Cahiers du cinéma, advanced the term to describe such directors as Jacques Tati, Alfred Hitchcock, and Jean-Luc Godard. In this groundbreaking study, Burnett combines biography with cultural history to uncover the roots of the auteur in the alternative cultural marketplace of midcentury France.


  • Ida Lupino, Director : Her Art and Resilience in Times of Transition / Therese Grisham and Julie Grossman
    PN 1998.3 L89 G75 2017eb
    Dominated by men and bound by the restrictive Hays Code, postwar Hollywood offered little support for a female director who sought to make unique films on controversial subjects. But Ida Lupino bucked the system, writing and directing a string of movies that exposed the dark underside of American society, on topics such as rape, polio, unwed motherhood, bigamy, exploitative sports, and serial murder.

    The first in-depth study devoted to Lupino's directorial work, this book makes a strong case for her as a trailblazing feminist auteur, a filmmaker with a clear signature style and an abiding interest in depicting the plights of postwar American women. Ida Lupino, Director not only examines her work as a cinematic auteur, but also offers a serious consideration of her diverse and long-ranging career, getting her start in Hollywood as an actress in her teens and twenties, directing her first films in her early thirties, and later working as an acclaimed director of television westerns, sitcoms, and suspense dramas. It also demonstrates how Lupino fused generic elements of film noir and the social problem film to create a distinctive directorial style that was both highly expressionistic and grittily realistic. Ida Lupino, Director thus shines a long-awaited spotlight on one of our greatest filmmakers.


  • Sexography : Sex Work in Documentary / Nicholas de Villiers
    PN 1995.9 S47 D48 2017eb

  • Hollywood Divided : The 1950 Screen Directors Guild Meeting and the Impact of the Blacklist / Kevin Brianton
    PN 1993.5 U6 B6748 2016eb

    On October 22, 1950, the Screen Directors Guild (SDG) gathered for a meeting at the opulent Beverly Hills Hotel. Among the group's leaders were some of the most powerful men in Hollywood -- John Ford, Cecil B. DeMille, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, John Huston, Frank Capra, William Wyler, and Rouben Mamoulian -- and the issue on the table was nothing less than a vote to dismiss Mankiewicz as the guild's president after he opposed an anticommunist loyalty oath that could have expanded the blacklist. The dramatic events of that evening have become mythic, and the legend has overshadowed the more complex realities of this crucial moment in Hollywood history.

    In Hollywood Divided, Kevin Brianton explores the myths associated with the famous meeting and the real events that they often obscure. He analyzes the lead-up to that fateful summit, examining the pressure exerted by the House Un-American Activities Committee. Brianton reveals the internal politics of the SDG, its initial hostile response to the HUAC investigations, the conservative reprisal, and the influence of the oath on the guild and the film industry as a whole. Hollywood Divided also assesses the impact of the historical coverage of the meeting on the reputation of the three key players in the drama.

    Brianton's study is a provocative and revealing revisionist history of the SDG's 1950 meeting and its lasting repercussions on the film industry as well as the careers of those who participated. Hollywood Divided illuminates how both the press's and the public's penchant for the "exciting story" have perpetuated fabrications and inaccurate representations of a turning point for the film industry.


  • Bodies in Suspense : Time and Affect in Cinema / Alanna Thain
    PN 1995.9 S668 T47 2017eb

    Bodies in Suspense presents a powerful new way to think through postdigital cinema and the affective turn in critical theory. According to Alanna Thain, suspense films allow us to experience the relation between two bodies: that of the film and that of the viewer. Through the "time machine" of suspense, film form, gender, genre, and spectatorship are revealed in innovative and different ways. These films not only engage us directly in ethical concerns, but also provide a key for understanding corporeal power in the digital era. 

    Offering a new framework for understanding cinematic suspense, Bodies in Suspense argues that the "body in time" enables us to experience the temporal dimension of the body directly. This is the first book to link two contemporary frames of analysis: questions of cinematic temporality and contemporary affect theory. Thain conducts close readings of influential suspense films by Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, Christian Marclay, Rian Johnson, and Lou Ye, and sets forth a compelling new theory of cinema, reading for the productivity of the "crime of time" that stages the duplicity of cinematic bodies. Through these films that foreground doubled characters and looping, Thain explores Gilles Deleuze's claim that "the direct time-image is the phantom which has always haunted cinema."

    A vital new addition to film theory, corporeality and affect theory, feminist theory, and the philosophy of time--and one of the first books to explore David Lynch's Hollywood trilogy-- Bodies in Suspense asks us to pay attention, above all, to the ways in which the condition of spectatorship creates a doubling sensation with important philosophical repercussions.


  • Making Icons : Repetition and the Female Image in Japanese Cinema, 1945–1964 / Jennifer Coates
    PN 1993.5 J3 C636 2016eb

  • African Filmmaking : Five Formations / edited by Kenneth W. Harrow
    PN 1993.5 A35 A366 2017eb
    This volume attempts to join the disparate worlds of Egyptian, Maghrebian, South African, Francophone, and Anglophone African cinema--that is, five "formations" of African cinema. These five areas are of particular significance--each in its own way. The history of South Africa, heavily marked by apartheid and its struggles, differs considerably from that of Egypt, which early on developed its own "Hollywood on the Nile." The history of French colonialism impacted the three countries of the Maghreb--Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco--differently than those in sub-Saharan Africa, where Senegal and Sembène had their own great effect on the Sahelian region. Anglophone Africa, particularly the films of Ghana and Nigeria, has dramatically altered the ways people have perceived African cinema for decades. History, geography, production, distribution, and exhibition are considered alongside film studies concerns about ideology and genre. This volume provides essential information for all those interested in the vital worlds of cinema in Africa since the time of the Lumière brothers.

  • Film as Philosophy / Bernd Herzogenrath, editor
    PN 1995 F457545 2016eb

    Film and philosophy have much in common, and books have been written on film and philosophy. But can films be, or do, philosophy? Can they "think"? Film as Philosophy is the first book to explore this fascinating question historically, thematically, and methodically.

    Bringing together leading scholars from universities across the globe, Film as Philosophy presents major new research that leads film studies and philosophy into a productive dialogue. It provides a uniquely sweeping, historical overview of the confluence of film and philosophy for more than a century, considering films from Jean Renoir, Lars von Trier, J#65533;rgen Leth, David Lynch, Michael Haneke, and others; the written works of filmmakers who also theorized on the medium, including Sergei Eisenstein and Jean Epstein; and others who have written on cinema, including Hugo M#65533;nsterberg, B#65533;la Bal#65533;zs, Andr#65533; Bazin, Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze, Stanley Cavell, Alain Badiou, Jacques Ranci#65533;re, and many more. 

    Representing a major step toward establishing a media philosophy that puts the status, role, and function of film into a new perspective, Film as Philosophy removes representational techniques from the center of inquiry, replacing these with the medium's ability to "think." Hence it accords film with "agency," and the dialogue between it and philosophy (and even neuroscience) is negotiated anew.

    Contributors: Nicole Brenez, U of Paris 3-Sorbon≠ Elisabeth Bronfen, U of Zurich; No#65533;l Carroll, CUNY; Tom Conley, Harvard U; Angela Dalle Vacche, Georgia Institute of Technology; Gregory Flaxman, U of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Alex Ling, Western Sydney U; Adrian Martin, Monash U; John #65533; Maoilearca, Kingston U, London; Robert Sinnerbrink, Macquarie U, Sydney; Murray Smith, U of Kent, Canterbury; Julia Vassilieva, Monash U, Melbour≠ Christophe Wall-Romana, U of Minnesota; and Thomas E. Wartenberg, Mount Holyoke College.


  • From Shtetl to Stardom : Jews and Hollywood / Steven J. Ross, editor ; Michael Renov and Vincent Brook, guest editors ; Lisa Ansell, associate editor
    PN 1993.5 U65 F767 2017eb
    The outsized influence of Jews in American entertainment from the early days of Hollywood to the present has proved an endlessly fascinating and controversial topic, for Jews and non-Jews alike. From Shtetl to Stardom: Jews and Hollywood takes an exciting and innovative approach to this rich and complex material. Exploring the subject from a scholarly perspective as well as up close and personal, the book combines historical and theoretical analysis by leading academics in the field with inside information from prominent entertainment professionals. Essays range from Vincent Brook's survey of the stubbornly persistent canard of Jewish industry "control" to Lawrence Baron and Joel Rosenberg's panel presentations on the recent brouhaha over Ben Urwand's book alleging collaboration between Hollywood and Hitler. Case studies by Howard Rodman and Joshua Louis Moss examine a key Coen brothers film, A Serious Man (Rodman), and Jill Soloway's groundbreaking television series, Transparent (Moss). Jeffrey Shandler and Shaina Hamermann train their respective lenses on popular satirical comedians of yesteryear (Allan Sherman) and those currently all the rage (Amy Schumer, Lena Dunham, and Sarah Silverman). David Isaacs relates his years of agony and hilarity in the television comedy writers' room, and interviews include in-depth discussions by Ross Melnick with Laemmle Theatres owner Greg Laemmle (relative of Universal Studios founder Carl Laemmle) and by Michael Renov with Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner. In all, From Shtetl to Stardom offers a uniquely multifaceted, multimediated, and up-to-the-minute account of the remarkable role Jews have played over the centuries and ongoing in American popular culture.

  • Contemporary cinema and 'old age' : gender and the silvering of stardom / Josephine Dolan
    PN 1995.9 A433 D653 2017eb

  • The director's cut : picturing Hollywood in the 21st century : conversations with 21 contemporary filmmakers / edited by Stephan Littger ; foreword by Dan Kleinman
    PN 1998.2 D545 2006

    In The Director's Cut, 21 Hollywood filmmakers share the thrilling accounts of their creative journeys into the film industry's most coveted positions. Together, their films have won dozens of Oscars.


    Each conversation provides a revealing and in-depth exploration of each director's artistic roots - giving readers an unparalleled understanding of the very different environments and attitudes that these outstanding filmmakers have experienced and embraced in their careers and personal lives.




    The directors in this book have been chosen on grounds of their reputation, sustained popularity at the box office, and diversity of background - both professional (genre, style, etc) and personal (family, origin, etc). The book truly reflects the variety of talent that has arrived from all over the world to make movies in Hollywood today.




    Thanks to the candid honesty and openness of these directors, this collection offers illuminating insights into their creative decision-making processes and the key biographical moments in their lives.




    Stephan Littger's own background as a young filmmaker and an Oxford graduated psychologist enables him to approach these star directors in an empathetic and focused manner, helping them to talk openly about the years of emotional struggle, personal doubt and tentative success that are part of every filmmaker's life.






    The Director's Cut should become a standard volume for aspiring filmmakers. And it's also a compelling and entertaining read for committed moviegoers and anyone interested in the marriage between artistic creation and commercial success.


  • Filmosophy / Daniel Frampton
    PN 1995 F675 2006
    Filmosophy is a provocative new manifesto for a radically philosophical way of understanding cinema. It coalesces twentieth-century ideas of film as thought (from Hugo Münsterberg to Gilles Deleuze) into a practical theory of "film-thinking," arguing that film style conveys poetic ideas through a constant dramatic "intent" about the characters, spaces, and events of film. Discussing contemporary filmmakers such as Béla Tarr and the Dardenne brothers, this timely contribution to the study of film and philosophy will provoke debate among audiences and filmmakers alike.

    FILMOSOPHY ® is a registered U.S. trademark owned by Valentin Stoilov (www.filmosophy.com) for educational services in the field of motion picture history theory and production. Mr. Stoilov is not the source or origin of this book and has not sponsored or endorsed it or its author.

  • Mock classicism : Latin American film comedy, 1930-1960 / Nilo Couret
    PN 1995.9 C55 C687 2018
    In Mock Classicism Nilo Couret presents an alternate history of Latin American cinema that traces the popularity and cultural significance of film comedies as responses to modernization and the forerunners to a more explicitly political New Latin American Cinema of the 1960s. By examining the linguistic play of comedians such as Cantinflas, Oscarito and Grande Otelo, Niní Marshall, and Luis Sandrini, the author demonstrates aspects of Latin American comedy that operate via embodiment on one hand and spatiotemporal emplacement on the other. Taken together, these parallel examples of comedic practice demonstrate how Latin American film comedies produce a "critically proximate" spectator who is capable of perceiving and organizing space and time differently. Combining close readings of films, archival research, film theory, and Latin American history, Mock Classicism rethinks classicism as a discourse that mediates and renders the world and argues that Latin American cinema became classical in distinct ways from Hollywood.

  • Wes Anderson / Donna Kornhaber
    PN 1998.3 A526 K67 2017
    The Grand Budapest Hotel and Moonrise Kingdom have made Wes Anderson a filmmaking force. Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums have become quotable cult classics. Yet every new Anderson release brings out droves of critics eager to charge him with stylistic excess and self-indulgent eclecticism. Donna Kornhaber approaches Anderson's style as the necessary product of the narrative and thematic concerns that define his body of work. Using Anderson's focus on collecting, Kornhaber situates the director as the curator of his filmic worlds, a prime mover who artfully and conscientiously arranges diverse components into cohesive collections and taxonomies. Anderson peoples each mise-en-scéne in his ongoing "Wesworld" with characters orphaned, lost, and out of place amidst a riot of handmade clutter and relics. Within, they seek a wholeness and collective identity they manifestly lack, with their pain expressed via an ordered emotional palette that, despite being muted, cries out for attention. As Kornhaber shows, Anderson's films offer nothing less than a fascinating study in the sensation of belonging--told by characters who possess it the least. Covering Anderson's entire oeuvre and including an interview with the director, Wes Anderson is an entertaining look at one of our most beloved and polarizing filmmakers.

  • From film practice to data process : production aesthetics and representational practices of a film industry in transition / Sarah Atkinson
    PN 1995.9 T43 A85 2018
    To what extent have digital innovations transformed the UK film industry? What new practices and processes are emerging within the contemporary UK filmmaking landscape? What impact is this having upon filmmaking professionals?

    The business of conventional feature filmmaking is like no other, in that it assembles a huge company of people from a range of disciplines on a temporary basis, all to engage in the collaborative endeavour of producing a unique, one-off piece of work. By focusing on the pivotal year of 2012, and by considering the input of every single contributor to the process, this book illuminates how this period of analogue to digital transition is impacting upon working practices, cultures, opportunities and structures in the industry, and examines the various causative forces behind their adoptions and resistances. With an in-depth case study of Sally Potter's 2012 film Ginger & Rosa, and drawing upon interviews with international film industry practitioners, From Film Practice to Data Process is a groundbreaking examination of film production in its totality, in a moment of profound change.

  • Virtual reality filmmaking : techniques & best practices for VR filmmakers / Celine Tricart
    PN 1995.9 V57 T75 2018

    Virtual Reality Filmmakingpresents a comprehensive guide to the use of virtual reality in filmmaking, including narrative, documentary, live event production, and more.Written by Celine Tricart, a filmmaker and an expert in new technologies, the book provides a hands-on guide to creative filmmaking in this exciting new medium, and includes coverage on how to make a film in VR from start to finish. Topics covered include:

    The history of VR; VR cameras; Game engines and interactive VR; The foundations of VR storytelling; Techniques for shooting in live action VR; VR postproduction and visual effects; VR distribution; Interviews with experts in the field including the Emmy-winning studios Felix & Paul and Oculus Story Studio, Wevr, Viacom, Fox Sports, Sundance's New Frontier, and more.

  • Cinema's military industrial complex / edited by Haidee Wasson and Lee Grieveson
    PN 1993.5 U6 C5285 2018
    The vast and influential American military has been aided and abetted by cinema since the earliest days of the medium. The army, navy, and air force put films to work in myriad ways, enlisting them to entertain, train, and heal soldiers as well as to propagandize, strategize, spy, map, and develop weapons, from rifles to atomic bombs. Presenting new essays based on archival research, Cinema's Military Industrial Complex addresses the relationship of military cinema to Hollywood, technological innovation, new modes of filmmaking, unique film styles and genres, and the rise of American soft power across the long twentieth century. This rich and timely volume is essential for scholars interested in the military's use of media and the exercise of influence within and beyond American borders.

  • Los Angeles documentary and the production of public history, 1958-1977 / Joshua Glick
    PN 1995.9 D6 G54 2018
    Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 explores how documentarians working between the election of John F. Kennedy and the Bicentennial created conflicting visions of the recent and more distant American past. Drawing on a wide range of primary documents, Joshua Glick analyzes the films of Hollywood documentarians such as David Wolper and Mel Stuart, along with lesser-known independents and activists such as Kent Mackenzie, Lynne Littman, and Jesús Salvador Treviño. While the former group reinvigorated a Cold War cultural liberalism, the latter group advocated for social justice in a city plagued by severe class stratification and racial segregation. Glick examines how mainstream and alternative filmmakers turned to the archives, civic institutions, and production facilities of Los Angeles in order to both change popular understandings of the city and shape the social consciousness of the nation.

  • Mexican transnational cinema and literature / edited by Maricruz Castro Ricalde, Mauricio Díaz Calderón and James Ramey
    PN 1993.5 M4 M463 2017

    «It was a great night for Mexico, as usual.» Donald Trump's words about Alejandro González Iñárritu on Oscars' night 2014 were a preview of his now-notorious attitude toward Mexicans: «He's walking away with all the gold? Was it that good? I don't hear that. It was certainly a big night for them.» Although the future president's comments were offensive, for scholars interested in transnational film and literature his words were pure gold, for they raise questions about «nation» as a category of representation. When we invoke «Mexican cinema», we imply that some kind of «national cinema» exists - but what is a national cinema? Is the cinema made in the US a national cinema in the same way as that of Mexico's? And is a film made by a foreigner in Mexico part of Mexican cinema? What does it mean for a film or a literary work to cross a border? And are borders to be defined in geographical terms only, or can they also be cast in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race, or language itself? This book, in short, reflects on the implications of the term transnational in relation to film and literature conceived - in any way, shape, or form - as «Mexican».


  • Women in European Holocaust films : perpetrators, victims and resisters / Ingrid Lewis
    PN 1995.9 H53 L49 2017
    This book considers how women's experiences have been treated in films dealing with Nazi persecution. Focusing on fiction films made in Europe between 1945 and the present, this study explores dominant discourses on and cinematic representation of women as perpetrators, victims and resisters. Ingrid Lewis contends that European Holocaust Cinema underwent a rich and complex trajectory of change with regard to the representation of women. This change both reflects and responds to key socio-cultural developments in the intervening decades as well as to new directions in cinema, historical research and politics of remembrance. The book will appeal to international scholars, students and educators within the fields of Holocaust Studies, Film Studies, European Cinema and Women's Studies.

  • Tracking color in cinema and art : philosophy and aesthetics / Edward Branigan
    PN 1995 B7185 2018

    Color is one of cinema's most alluring formal systems, building on a range of artistic traditions that orchestrate visual cues to tell stories, stage ideas, and elicit feelings. But what if color is not--or not only--a formal system, but instead a linguistic effect, emerging from the slipstream of our talk and embodiment in a world? This book develops a compelling framework from which to understand the mobility of color in art and mind, where color impressions are seen through, and even governed by, patterns of ordinary language use, schemata, memories, and narrative.

    Edward Branigan draws on the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein and other philosophers who struggle valiantly with problems of color aesthetics, contemporary theories of film and narrative, and art-historical models of analysis. Examples of a variety of media, from American pop art to contemporary European cinema, illustrate a theory based on a spectator's present-time tracking of temporal patterns that are firmly entwined with language use and social intelligence.


  • For the love of cinema : teaching our passion in and outside the classroom / edited by Rashna Wadia Richards and David T. Johnson
    PN 1993.7 F67 2017

    What role does love--of cinema, of cinema studies, of teaching and learning--play in teaching film? For the Love of Cinema brings together a wide range of film scholars to explore the relationship between cinephilia and pedagogy. All of them ask whether cine-love can inform the serious study of cinema. Chapter by chapter, writers approach this question from various perspectives: some draw on aspects of students' love of cinema as a starting point for rethinking familiar films or generating new kinds of analyses about the medium itself; others reflect on how their own cinephilia informs the way they teach cinema; and still others offer new ways of writing (both verbally and audiovisually) with a love of cinema in the age of new media. Together, they form a collection that is as much a guide for teaching cinephilia as it is an energetic dialogue about the ways that cinephilia and pedagogy enliven and rejuvenate one another.


  • The film experience : an introduction / Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White
    PN 1995 C655 2018

    The experience of watching films can begin with journeying to imaginary worlds, witnessing re-creations of history, observing stars in familiar and unfamiliar roles, and exploring the laughter, thrills, or emotions of different genres. Understanding the full depth and variety of these experiences starts with that enjoyment. But it also requires knowledge of the technology, business, history, and visual language of cinema. The Film Experience brings all of this together in one comprehensive book.



    The Film Experience: An Introduction aims to help students learn these film languages and synthesize them into a cohesive understanding of the medium that will, in turn, enhance their own film experiences. The new edition places special emphasis on representation throughout the history of film, highlighting voices and groups from the past that interact with the medium's future. More than ever, the book places important historical developments in the modern, accessible context of ever-changing film technology, economics, and narrative. Throughout the book (and online through its LaunchPad Solo), perfect examples and digital tools bring this material to life.


  • Shock value / by John Waters
    PN 1998 A3 W3488 1981

  • De dos / [ce numéro a été coordonné par Michelle Humbert et Cyril Neyrat]
    PN 1995.9 B62 D67 2001

  • Theory of film practice. Translated by Helen R. Lane. Introd. by Annette Michelson
    PN 1995 B8513
page last updated on: Sunday 22 July 2018
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