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Classical Languages and Linguistics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Items in Classical Languages and Linguistics (PA) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 120 days.


  • Hesiod and classical Greek poetry : reception and transformation in the Fifth Century BCE / Zoe Stamatopoulou, Washington University, St Louis
    PA 4011 S73 2017
    Hesiod was regarded by the Greeks as a foundational figure of their culture, alongside Homer. This book examines the rich and varied engagement of fifth-century lyric and drama with the poetic corpus attributed to Hesiod as well as with the poetic figure of Hesiod. The first half of the book is dedicated to Hesiodic reception in Pindaric and Bacchylidean poetry, with a particular focus on poetics, genealogies and mythological narratives, and didactic voices. The second half examines how Hesiodic narratives are approached and appropriated in tragedy and satyr drama, especially in the Prometheus plays and in Euripides' Ion. It also explores the multifaceted engagement of Old Comedy with the poetry and authority associated with Hesiod. Through close readings of numerous case studies, the book surveys the complex landscape of Hesiodic reception in the fifth century BCE, focusing primarily on lyric and dramatic responses to the Hesiodic tradition.

  • The rise of Rome : books one to five / Livy
    PA 6452 A5 2008
    `the fates ordained the founding of this great city and the beginning of the world's mightiest empire, second only to the power of the gods' Romulus and Remus, the rape of Lucretia, Horatius at the bridge, the saga of Coriolanus, Cincinnatus called from his farm to save the state - these and many more are stories which, immortalised by Livy in his history of early Rome, have become part of our cultural heritage. The historian's huge work, written between 20 BC and AD 17, ran to 12 books, beginning with Rome's founding in 753 BC and coming down to Livy's own lifetime (9 BC). Books 1-5 cover the period from Rome's beginnings to her first great foreign conquest, the capture of the Etruscan city of Veii and,a few years later, to her first major defeat, the sack of the city by the Gauls in 390 BC.

  • The Aeneid / Virgil ; translated and with an introduction by David West
    PA 6807 A5 W47 2003
    After half a century of civil strife in Rome and Italy, Virgil wrote The Aeneid to honour the emperor Augustus by praising Aeneas - Augustus' legendary ancestor. As a patriotic epic imitating Homer, The Aeneid also provided Rome with a literature equal to that of Greece. It tells of Aeneas, survivor of the sack of Troy, and of his seven-year journey- to Carthage, falling tragically in love with Queen Dido; then to the underworld, in the company of the Sibyl of Cumae; and finally to Italy, where he founded Rome. It is a story of defeat and exile, of love and war, hailed by Tennyson as 'the stateliest measure ever moulded by the lips of man'. David West's acclaimed prose translation is accompanied by his revised introduction and individual prefaces to the twelve books of The Aeneid .

  • The golden ass, or, Metamorphoses / Apuleius ; translated with an introduction and notes by E.J. Kenney
    PA 6209 M3 K46 1998
    Written towards the end of the second century AD, The Golden Ass tells the story of the many adventures of a young man whose fascination with witchcraft leads him to be transformed into a donkey. The bewitched Lucius passes from owner to owner encountering a desperate gang of robbers and being forced to perform lewd human tricks on stage until the Goddess Isis finally breaks the spell and Lucius is initiated into her cult. Apuleius enchanting story has inspired generations of writers such as Boccaccio, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Keats with its dazzling combination of allegory, satire, bawdiness and sheer exuberance, and remains the most continuously and accessibly amusing book to have survived from Classical antiquity.

  • Birds, peace, wealth : Aristophanes' critique of the gods / three plays translated by Wayne Ambler and Thomas L. Pangle
    PA 3877 A3 A47 2013
    These three comedies provoke searching reflections on the religious nature of humanity: What are the psychological sources of piety? What is longed for in and through piety? What would a god need to be, to truly provide what our humanity seeks from divinity? Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author.

  • The Odyssey / Homer ; translated by Emily Wilson
    PA 4025 A5 W56 2018

    A lean, fleet-footed translation that recaptures Homer's "nimble gallop" and brings an ancient epic to new life.

    The first great adventure story in the Western canon, the Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty, and power; about marriage, family, and identity; and about travelers, hospitality, and the changing meanings of home in a strange world.

    This vivid new poetic translation--the first ever by a woman--matches the number of lines in the Greek original, thus striding at Homer's sprightly pace. Eschewing showy poeticisms and high-flown rhetoric, Emily Wilson employs elemental, resonant language and a five-beat line to produce a translation with an enchanting "rhythm and rumble" that avoids proclaiming its own grandeur or importance.

    An engrossing tale told in a compelling new voice that allows contemporary readers to luxuriate in Homer's magical descriptions and similes and to thrill at the tension and excitement of its hero's fantastical adventures, Wilson's Odyssey recaptures what is "epic" about this wellspring of world literature.
    3 maps


  • Greek literature / edited by P.E. Easterling and B.M.W. Knox
    PA 3052 G73 1985eb

  • Latin literature / edited by E.J. Kenney ; advisory editor, W.V. Clausen
    PA 6003 L3 1982eb

  • Aeschylus I : the Persians, the Seven Against Thebes, the Suppliant Maidens, Prometheus Bound / by Aeschylus ; translated by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore
    PA 3827 A466 2013
    Aeschylus I contains "The Persians," translated by Seth Benardete; "The Seven Against Thebes," translated by David Gre≠ "The Suppliant Maidens," translated by Seth Benardete; and "Prometheus Bound," translated by David Grene.   Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century.   In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides' Medea , The Children of Heracles , Andromache , and Iphigenia among the Taurians , fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles's satyr-drama The Trackers . New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays.   In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

  • Elegies. Propertius ; edited by W.A. Camps
    PA 6644 B4 1965

  • Le prose latine attribuite a Jacopone da Todi / Enrico Menestò
    PA 8360 J2Z78
page last updated on: Monday 19 February 2018
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