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Philosophy, Aesthetics, Ethics - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range B - BD (Philosophy) and BH - BJ (Aesthetics, Ethics) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • A history of pre-Buddhistic Indian philosophy
    B 131 B33 1970

  • Phenomenology and natural existence; essays in honor of Marvin Farber. Edited by Dale Riepe
    B 829.5 P445 1973

  • The Wisdom of Frugality : Why Less Is More - More or Less / Emrys Westacott
    BJ 1496 W47 2016eb

    From Socrates to Thoreau, most philosophers, moralists, and religious leaders have seen frugality as a virtue and have associated simple living with wisdom, integrity, and happiness. But why? And are they right? Is a taste for luxury fundamentally misguided? If one has the means to be a spendthrift, is it foolish or reprehensible to be extravagant?

    In this book , Emrys Westacott examines why, for more than two millennia, so many philosophers and people with a reputation for wisdom have been advocating frugality and simple living as the key to the good life. He also looks at why most people have ignored them, but argues that, in a world facing environmental crisis, it may finally be time to listen to the advocates of a simpler way of life.

    The Wisdom of Frugality explores what simplicity means, why it's supposed to make us better and happier, and why, despite its benefits, it has always been such a hard sell. The book looks not only at the arguments in favor of living frugally and simply, but also at the case that can be made for luxury and extravagance, including the idea that modern economies require lots of getting and spending.

    A philosophically informed reflection rather than a polemic, The Wisdom of Frugality ultimately argues that we will be better off--as individuals and as a society--if we move away from the materialistic individualism that currently rules.


  • Transcendentalism and the Cultivation of the Soul / Barry M. Andrews
    B 905 A77 2017eb

  • Rethinking Sincerity and Authenticity : The Ethics of Theatricality in Kant, Kierkegaard, and Levinas / Howard Pickett
    B 105 A8 P53 2017eb

    "This above all: To thine own self be true," is an ideal--or pretense--belonging as much to Hamlet as to the carefully choreographed realms of today's politics and social media. But what if our "true" selves aren't our "best" selves? Instagram's curated portraits of authenticity often betray the paradox of our performative selves: sincerity obliges us to be who we actually are, yet ethics would have us be better.

    Drawing on the writings of Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, and Emmanuel Levinas, Howard Pickett presents a vivid defense of "virtuous hypocrisy." Our fetish for transparency tends to allow us to forget that the self may not be worthy of expression, and may become unethically narcissistic in the act of expression. Alert to this ambivalence, these great thinkers advocate incongruent ways of being. Rethinking Sincerity and Authenticity offers an engaging new appraisal not only of the ethics of theatricality but of the theatricality of ethics, contending that pursuit of one's ideal self entails a relational and ironic performance of identity that lies beyond the pure notion of expressive individualism.


  • Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks, Volume 9 Journals NB26-NB30 / edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, Bruce H. Kirmmse, David D. Possen, Joel D.S. Rasmussen, and Vanessa Rumble.
    B 4372 E5 2007eb

    For over a century, the Danish thinker Søren Kierkegaard (1813-55) has been at the center of a number of important discussions, concerning not only philosophy and theology, but also, more recently, fields such as social thought, psychology, and contemporary aesthetics, especially literary theory.

    Despite his relatively short life, Kierkegaard was an extraordinarily prolific writer, as attested to by the 26-volume Princeton University Press edition of all of his published writings. But Kierkegaard left behind nearly as much unpublished writing, most of which consists of what are called his "journals and notebooks." Kierkegaard has long been recognized as one of history's great journal keepers, but only rather small portions of his journals and notebooks are what we usually understand by the term "diaries." By far the greater part of Kierkegaard's journals and notebooks consists of reflections on a myriad of subjects--philosophical, religious, political, personal. Studying his journals and notebooks takes us into his workshop, where we can see his entire universe of thought. We can witness the genesis of his published works, to be sure--but we can also see whole galaxies of concepts, new insights, and fragments, large and small, of partially (or almost entirely) completed but unpublished works. Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks enables us to see the thinker in dialogue with his times and with himself.

    Kierkegaard wrote his journals in a two-column format, one for his initial entries and the second for the extensive marginal comments that he added later. This edition of the journals reproduces this format, includes several photographs of original manuscript pages, and contains extensive scholarly commentary on the various entries and on the history of the manuscripts being reproduced.

    Volume 9 of this 11-volume series includes five of Kierkegaard's important "NB" journals (Journals NB26 through NB30), which span from June 1852 to August 1854. This period was marked by Kierkegaard's increasing preoccupation with what he saw as an unbridgeable gulf in Christianity--between the absolute ideal of the religion of the New Testament and the official, state-sanctioned culture of "Christendom," which, embodied by the Danish People's Church, Kierkegaard rejected with increasing vehemence. Crucially, Kierkegaard's nemesis, Bishop Jakob Peter Mynster, died during this period and, in the months following, Kierkegaard can be seen moving inexorably toward the famous "attack on Christendom" with which he ended his life.


  • True Enough / Catherine Z. Elgin
    BD 161 E445 2017eb

    The development of an epistemology that explains how science and art embody and convey understanding.

    Philosophy valorizes truth, holding that there can never be epistemically good reasons to accept a known falsehood, or to accept modes of justification that are not truth conducive. How can this stance account for the epistemic standing of science, which unabashedly relies on models, idealizations, and thought experiments that are known not to be true? In True Enough , Catherine Elgin argues that we should not assume that the inaccuracy of models and idealizations constitutes an inadequacy. To the contrary, their divergence from truth or representational accuracy fosters their epistemic functioning. When effective, models and idealizations are, Elgin contends, felicitous falsehoods that exemplify features of the phenomena they bear on. Because works of art deploy the same sorts of felicitous falsehoods, she argues, they also advance understanding.

    Elgin develops a holistic epistemology that focuses on the understanding of broad ranges of phenomena rather than knowledge of individual facts. Epistemic acceptability, she maintains, is a matter not of truth-conduciveness, but of what would be reflectively endorsed by the members of an idealized epistemic community--a quasi-Kantian realm of epistemic ends.


  • The Fate of Transcendentalism : Secularity, Materiality, and Human Flourishing / Bruce A. Ronda
    B 905 R66 2017eb

    The Fate of Transcendentalism examines the mid-nineteenth-century flowering of American transcendentalism and shows the movement's influence on several subsequent writers, thinkers, and artists who have drawn inspiration and energy from the creative outpouring it produced. In this wide-ranging study, Bruce A. Ronda offers an account of the movement as an early example of the secular turn in American culture and brings to bear insights from philosopher Charles Taylor and others who have studied the broad cultural phenomenon of secularization.

    Ronda's account turns on the interplay and tension between two strands in the transcendentalist movement. Many of the social experiments associated with transcendentalism, such as the Brook Farm and Fruitlands reform communities, Temple School, and the West Street Bookshop, as well as the transcendentalists' contributions to abolition and women's rights, spring from a commitment to human flourishing without reference to a larger religious worldview. Other aspects of the movement, particularly Henry Thoreau's late nature writing and the rich tradition it has inspired, seek to minimize the difference between the material and the ideal, the human and the not-human. The Fate of Transcendentalism allows readers to engage with this fascinating dialogue between transcendentalist thinkers who believe that the ultimate end of human life is the fulfillment of human possibility and others who challenge human-centeredness in favor a relocation of humanity in a vital cosmos.

    Ronda traces the persistence of transcendentalism in the work of several representative twentieth- and twenty-first-century figures, including Charles Ives, Joseph Cornell, Truman Nelson, Annie Dillard, and Mary Oliver, and shows how this dialogue continues to inform important imaginative work to this date.


  • Feminist Phenomenology Futures / edited by Helen A. Fielding and Dorothea E. Olkowski
    B 829.5 F433 2017eb

    Distinguished feminist philosophers consider the future of their field and chart its political and ethical course in this forward-looking volume. Engaging with themes such as the historical trajectory of feminist phenomenology, ways of perceiving and making sense of the contemporary world, and the feminist body in health and ethics, these essays affirm the base of the discipline as well as open new theoretical spaces for work that bridges bioethics, social identity, physical ability, and the very nature and boundaries of the female body. Entanglements with thinkers such as Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Beauvoir, and Arendt are evident and reveal new directions for productive philosophical work. Grounded in the richness of the feminist philosophical tradition, this work represents a significant opening to the possible futures of feminist phenomenological research.


  • Inconsistencies / Marcus Steinweg ; translated by Amanda DeMarco
    BC 199 I45 S7413 2017eb

    Meditations, aphorisms, maxims, notes, and comments construct a philosophy of thought congruent with the inconsistency of our reality.

    Those who continue to think never return to their point of departure.

    -- Inconsistencies

    These 130 short texts--aphoristic, interlacing, and sometimes perplexing--target a perennial philosophical problem: Our consciousness and our experience of reality are inconsistent, fragmentary, and unstable; God is dead, and our identity as subjects discordant. How can we establish a new mode of thought that does not cling to new gods or the false security of rationality? Marcus Steinweg, as he did in his earlier book The Terror of Evidence, constructs a philosophical position from fragments, maxims, meditations, and notes, formulating a philosophy of thought that expresses and enacts the inconsistency of our reality.



    Steinweg considers, among other topics, life as a game ("To think is to play because no thought is firmly grounded"); sexuality ("wasteful, contradictory, and contingent"); desire ("Desire has a thousand names; It's earned none of them"); reality ("overdetermined and excessively complex"); and world ("a nonconcept"). He disposes of philosophy in one sentence ("Philosophy is a continual process of its own redefinition.") but spends multiple pages on "A Tear in Immanence," invoking Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and others. He describes "Wandering with Foucault" ("Thought entails wandering as well as straying into madness") and brings together Derrida and Debord. He poses a question: "Why should a cat be more mysterious than a dog?" and later answers one: "Beauty is truth because truth is beauty." By the end, we have accompanied Steinweg on converging trains of thought. "Thinking means continuing to think," he writes, adding "But thinking can only pose questions by answering others." The question of inconsistency? Asked and answered, and asked.


  • Positive Nihilism : My Confrontation with Heidegger / Hartmut Lange ; translated by Adrian Nathan West
    B 3279 H48 S466348 2018eb

    A German writer's aphoristic, poetic, and difficult reflections on Heidegger's Being and Time .

    There is a beyond of reason and unreason. It is the human psyche.

    -- Positive Nihilism

    Like many German intellectuals, Hartmut Lange has long grappled with Heidegger. Positive Nihilism is the result of a lifetime of reading Being and Time and offers a series of reflections that are aphoristic, poetic, and (appropriately, considering his object of study) difficult. Lange begins with an abyss ("There is an abyss of the finite. It is temporality") and proceeds almost immediately to extremity: "The twentieth century was governed by psychopaths. They collapsed the boundaries of moral reason and refuted Kant's analysis of consciousness." He reflects further: "But who shall punish whom? One man's virtue is another man's crime. Thus Hitler could feel unwaveringly, as he wiped out entire populations, the starry sky above him and the moral law within him , as stipulated by Kant." He considers the concept of civilization ("misleading"; "how should one oppose the remedies of civilization to the egomania, the murderous appetites of such outright psychopaths as Stalin or Pol Pot?"), the act of thinking (a fata morgana), the psyche, and Heidegger's Dasein.

    Positive Nihilism can be considered a pocket companion to Being and Time . "Heidegger's understanding of Being is nihilistic," Lange writes, and then explains his assertion. He draws on Kant, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and Shakespeare's Othello for supporting arguments and illustrations. "Everyone is possessed of the courage to have angst about death. The question is whether this courage necessarily secures those vital advantages Heidegger alleges"-that "self-understanding [is] the mental anticipation of death." Lange wrestles with Heidegger's position, calling on Tolstoy, Georg Trakl, Herman Bang, and Heinrich von Kleist to argue against it.


  • All and Nothing : A Digital Apocalypse / Martin Burckhardt and Dirk Höfer ; translated by Erik Butler
    B 54 B8713 2017eb

    Why 1 = presence and 0 = absence and the digital world formula is x = x n : an exploration of meaning in a universe of infinite replication.

    In the beginning was the Zero, and the Zero was with God, and God was the One.

    -- All and Nothing

    In 1854, the British mathematician George Boole presented the idea of a universe the elements of which could be understood in terms of the logic of absence and presence: 0 and 1, all and nothing--the foundation of binary code. The Boolean digits 0 and 1 do not designate a quantity. In the Boolean world, x times x always equals x; all and nothing meet in the formula x = x n . As everything becomes digitized, God the clockmaker is replaced by God the programmer. This book-described by its authors as "a theology for the digital world"--explores meaning in a digital age of infinite replication, in a world that has dissolved into information and achieved immortality by turning into a pure sign.

    All and Nothing compares information that spreads without restraint to a hydra--the mythological monster that grew two heads for every one that was cut off. Information is thousand-headed and thousand-eyed because Hydra's tracks cannot be deleted. It shows that when we sit in front of a screen, we are actually on the other side, looking at the world as an uncanny reminder of the nondigitized. It compares our personal data to our shadows and our souls, envisioning the subconscious laid out on a digital bier like a corpse.

    The digital world, the authors explain, summons forth fantasies of a chiliastic or apocalyptic nature. The goal of removing the representative from mathematics has now been achieved on a greater scale than Boole could have imagined.


  • The Modern Turn / edited by Michael Rohlf
    B 790 M63 2017eb

  • Incontinence of the Void : Economico-Philosophical Spandrels / Slavoj Žižek
    B 4870 Z593 I53 2017eb

    The "formidably brilliant" Žižek considers sexuality, ontology, subjectivity, and Marxian critiques of political economy by way of Lacanian psychoanalysis.

    If the most interesting theoretical interventions emerge today from the interspaces between fields, then the foremost interspaceman is Slavoj Žižek. In Incontinence of the Void (the title is inspired by a sentence in Samuel Beckett's late masterpiece Ill Seen Ill Said), Žižek explores the empty spaces between philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the critique of political economy. He proceeds from the universal dimension of philosophy to the particular dimension of sexuality to the singular dimension of the critique of political economy. The passage from one dimension to another is immanent: the ontological void is accessible only through the impasses of sexuation and the ongoing prospect of the abolition of sexuality, which is itself opened up by the technoscientific progress of global capitalism, in turn leading to the critique of political economy.

    Responding to his colleague and fellow Short Circuits author Alenka Zupancic's What Is Sex? , Žižek examines the notion of an excessive element in ontology that gives body to radical negativity, which becomes the antagonism of sexual difference. From the economico-philosophical perspective, Žižek extrapolates from ontological excess to Marxian surplus value to Lacan's surplus enjoyment. In true Žižekian fashion, Incontinence of the Void focuses on eternal topics while detouring freely into contemporary issuesfrom the Internet of Things to Danish TV series.


  • Self-Understanding and Lifeworld : Basic Traits of a Phenomenological Hermeneutics / Hans-Helmuth Gander ; translated by Ryan Drake and Joshua Rayman
    B 3279 H94 G3613 2017eb

    What are the foundations of human self-understanding and the value of responsible philosophical questioning? Focusing on Heidegger's early work on facticity, historicity, and the phenomenological hermeneutics of factical-historical life, Hans-Helmuth Gander develops an idea of understanding that reflects our connection with the world and other, and thus invites deep consideration of phenomenology, hermeneutics, and deconstruction. He draws usefully on Husserl's phenomenology and provides grounds for exchange with Descartes, Dilthey, Nietzsche, Gadamer, Ricoeur, and Foucault. On the way to developing a contemporary hermeneutical philosophy, Gander clarifies the human relation to self in and through conversation with Heidegger's early hermeneutics. Questions about reading and writing then follow as these are the very actions that structure human self-understanding and world understanding.


  • The Ink of the Scholars : Reflections on Philosophy in Africa / Souleymane Bachir Diagne ; translated from French by Jonathan Adjemian
    B 5305 D5313 2016eb

  • Sites of Exposure : Art, Politics, and the Nature of Experience / John Russon
    BD 431 R877 2017eb

    John Russon draws from a broad range of art and literature to show how philosophy speaks to the most basic and important questions in our everyday lives. In Sites of Exposure, Russon grapples with how personal experiences such as growing up and confronting death combine with broader issues such as political oppression, economic exploitation, and the destruction of the natural environment to make life meaningful. His is cutting-edge philosophical work, illuminated by original and rigorous thinking that relies on cross-cultural communication and engagement with the richness of human cultural history. These probing interpretations of the nature of phenomenology, the philosophy of art, history, and politics, are appropriate for students and scholars of philosophy at all levels.


  • Kierkegaard's God and the Good Life / edited by Stephen Minster, J. Aaron Simmons, and Michael Strawser
    B 4377 K5123 2017eb

    Kierkegaard's God and the Good Life focuses on faith and love, two central topics in Kierkegaard's writings, to grapple with complex questions at the intersection of religion and ethics. Here, leading scholars reflect on Kierkegaard's understanding of God, the religious life, and what it means to exist ethically. The contributors then shift to psychology, hope, knowledge, and the emotions as they offer critical and constructive readings for contemporary philosophical debates in the philosophy of religion, moral philosophy, and epistemology. Together, they show how Kierkegaard continues to be an important resource for understandings of religious existence, public discourse, social life, and how to live virtuously.


  • A Dark History of Modern Philosophy / Bernard Freydberg
    B 791 F74 2017eb

    Delving beneath the principal discourses of philosophy from Descartes through Kant, Bernard Freydberg plumbs the previously concealed dark forces that ignite the inner power of modern thought. He contends that reason itself issues from an implicit and unconscious suppression of the nonrational. Even the modern philosophical concerns of nature and limits are undergirded by a dark side that dwells in them and makes them possible. Freydberg traces these dark sources to the poetry of Hesiod, the fragments of Heraclitus and Parmenides, and the Platonic dialogues and claims that they rear their heads again in the work of Spinoza, Schelling, and Nietzsche. Freydberg does not set forth a critique of modern philosophy but explores its intrinsic continuity with its ancient roots.


  • Transhumanism : Evolutionary Futurism and the Human Technologies of Utopia / Andrew Pilsch
    B 821 P46 2017eb

    Transhumanism posits that humanity is on the verge of rapid evolutionary change as a result of emerging technologies and increased global consciousness. However, this insight is dismissed as a naive and controversial reframing of posthumanist thought, having also been vilified as "the most dangerous idea in the world" by Francis Fukuyama. In this book, Andrew Pilsch counters these critiques, arguing instead that transhumanism's utopian rhetoric actively imagines radical new futures for the species and its habitat.

    Pilsch situates contemporary transhumanism within the longer history of a rhetorical mode he calls "evolutionary futurism" that unifies diverse texts, philosophies, and theories of science and technology that anticipate a radical explosion in humanity's cognitive, physical, and cultural potentialities. By conceptualizing transhumanism as a rhetoric, as opposed to an obscure group of fringe figures, he explores the intersection of three major paradigms shaping contemporary Western intellectual life: cybernetics, evolutionary biology, and spiritualism. In analyzing this collision, his work traces the belief in a digital, evolutionary, and collective future through a broad range of texts written by theologians and mystics, biologists and computer scientists, political philosophers and economic thinkers, conceptual artists and Golden Age science fiction writers. Unearthing the long history of evolutionary futurism, Pilsch concludes, allows us to more clearly see the novel contributions that transhumanism offers for escaping our current geopolitical bind by inspiring radical utopian thought.


  • The Cleansing of the Heart : The Sacraments as Instrumental Causes in the Thomistic Tradition / Reginald M. Lynch, OP
    B 765 T54 L96 2017eb

  • Atopias : Manifesto for a Radical Existentialism / Fr⥤⥲ic Neyrat ; translated by Walt Hunter and Lindsay Turner
    B 819 N493 2018eb

  • Philosophical Provocations : 55 Short Essays / Colin McGinn
    BD 41 M34 2017eb

    Pithy, direct, and bold: essays that propose new ways to think about old problems, spanning a range of philosophical topics.

    In Philosophical Provocations , Colin McGinn offers a series of short, sharp essays that take on philosophical problems ranging from the concept of mind to paradox, altruism, and the relation between God and the Devil. Avoiding the usual scholarly apparatus and embracing a blunt pithiness, McGinn aims to achieve as much as possible in as short a space as possible while covering as many topics as possible. Much academic philosophical writing today is long, leaden, citation heavy, dense with qualifications, and painful to read. The essays in Philosophical Provocations are short, direct, and engaging, often challenging philosophical orthodoxy as they consider issues in mind, language, knowledge, metaphysics, biology, ethics, and religion.

    McGinn is looking for new ways to think about old problems. Thus he writes, about consciousness, "I think we have been all wrong," and goes on to suggest that both consciousness and the unconscious are mysteries. Summing up his proposal on altruism, he remarks, "My suggestion can now be stated, somewhat brutally, as follows: human altruism is the result of parasitic manipulation." He takes a moment to reflect: "I really don't know why it is good to be alive, though I am convinced that the standard suggestions don't work." McGinn gets straight to the point and states his position with maximum clarity. These essays offer provocative invitations to think again.


  • Aquinas on Virtue : A Causal Reading / Nicholas Austin
    B 765 T54 A98 2017eb

  • The Possibility of a World : Conversations with Pierre-Philippe Jandin / Jean-Luc Nancy, Pierre-Philippe Jandin
    B 2430 N364 A5 2017eb

  • Wilderness in America : Philosophical Writings / Henry Bugbee ; edited by David W. Rodick
    B 945 B761 2017eb

  • Entangled Worlds : Religion, Science, and New Materialisms / Catherine Keller and Mary-Jane Rubenstein, editors
    B 825 E58 2017eb

  • The Rigor of Things : Conversations with Dan Arbib / Jean-Luc Marion ; translated by Christina M. Gschwandtner
    B 2430 M284 A5 2017eb

  • Questions of Phenomenology : Language, Alterity, Temporality, Finitude / Françoise Dastur ; translated by Robert Vallier
    B 829.5 D3913 2017eb

  • Ponderings XII-XV Black Notebooks 1939-1941 / Martin Heidegger ; translated by Richard Rojcewicz
    B 3279 H48 S36213 2017eb

    Ponderings XII-XV is third in a series of four "Black Notebooks" which Martin Heidegger composed in the early years of World War II. As always with Heidegger, the thoughts expressed here are not superficial reflections on current events, but instead penetrate deeply into them in order to contemplate their historical importance. Throughout his ponderings, Heidegger meditates on the call for an antidote to the rampant technological attitude which views all things with a dismissive consumer mentality. Although this volume caused quite a scandal when originally published in German due to references to World-Judaism, English readers with access to the full text can now judge for themselves what Heidegger means in his use of that term. In style, this notebook is less aphoristic and more sustained than the previous ones, but remains probing, challenging, and fascinating.


  • Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger : History of a Love / Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger ; edited by Ursula Ludz ; translated from the German by Andrew Shields
    B 3279 H485 A7413 2004eb

    How could Hannah Arendt, a German Jew who fled Germany in 1931, have reconciled with Martin Heidegger, whom she knew had joined and actively participated in the Nazi Party? In this remarkable biography, Antonia Grunenberg tells how the relationship between Arendt and Heidegger embraced both love and thought and made their passions inseparable, both philosophically and romantically. Grunenberg recounts how the history between Arendt and Heidegger is entwined with the history of the twentieth century with its breaks, catastrophes, and crises. Against the violent backdrop of the last century, she details their complicated and often fissured relationship as well as their intense commitments to thinking.


  • Only a Joke Can Save Us : A Theory of Comedy / Todd McGowan
    BH 301 C7 M383 2017eb

  • Thomas and the Thomists : The Achievement of Thomas Aquinas and his Interpreters / Romanus Cessario and Cajetan Cuddy
    B 765 T54 C478 2017eb
    Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274) is one of the most important thinkers in the history of western civilization. A philosopher and theologian, a priest and preacher, Aquinas bequeathed to the world an enduring synthesis of philosophy, theology, and Christian spirituality. Aquinas championed the integration of faith and action, sound doctrine and right living, orthodoxy and orthopraxy. From the thirteenth century through the present day, his legacy has served as a blessing for the church and beyond. In the nearly eight hundred years since Aquinas's death, his thought has been studied, interpreted, criticized, reinvigorated, and anointed as the exemplar of Catholic theology. Thomas and the Thomists, a new volume in the Mapping the Tradition series, serves as an introduction to the life of Aquinas, the major contours of his teaching, and the lasting contribution he made to Christian thought. Romanus Cessario and Cajetan Cuddy also outline the history of the Thomist tradition--the great school of Aquinas's interpreters--from the medieval era through the revival of the Thomist heritage in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This volume affords its readers a working guide to understanding the history of Aquinas and his expositors as well as to grasping their significance for us today.

  • Visual Phenomenology / Michael Madary
    B 828.45 M335 2016eb

    Phenomenological and empirical methods of investigating visual experience converge to support the thesis that visual perception is an ongoing process of anticipation and fulfillment.

    In this book, Michael Madary examines visual experience, drawing on both phenomenological and empirical methods of investigation. He finds that these two approaches--careful, philosophical description of experience and the science of vision--independently converge on the same result: Visual perception is an ongoing process of anticipation and fulfillment.

    Madary first makes the case for the descriptive premise, arguing that the phenomenology of vision is best described as on ongoing process of anticipation and fulfillment. He discusses visual experience as being perspectival, temporal, and indeterminate; considers the possibility of surprise when appearances do not change as we expect; and considers the content of visual anticipation. Madary then makes the case for the empirical premise, showing that there are strong empirical reasons to model vision using the general form of anticipation and fulfillment. He presents a range of evidence from perceptual psychology and neuroscience, and reinterprets evidence for the two-visual-systems hypothesis. Finally, he considers the relationship between visual perception and social cognition. An appendix discusses Husserlian phenomenology as it relates to the argument of the book.

    Madary argues that the fact that there is a convergence of historically distinct methodologies itself is an argument that supports his findings. With Visual Phenomenology , he creates an exchange between the humanities and the sciences that takes both methods of investigation seriously.


  • Vico's New Science of the Intersubjective World / Vittorio Hösle ; translated and edited by Francis R. Hittinger
    B 3581 P73 H6713 2016eb

  • Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script : Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism / Elias Sacks
    B 2693 S23 2016eb

    Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) is often described as the founder of modern Jewish thought and as a leading philosopher of the late Enlightenment. One of Mendelssohn's main concerns was how to conceive of the relationship between Judaism, philosophy, and the civic life of a modern state. Elias Sacks explores Mendelssohn's landmark account of Jewish practice--Judaism's "living script," to use his famous phrase--to present a broader reading of Mendelssohn's writings and extend inquiry into conversations about modernity and religion. By studying Mendelssohn's thought in these dimensions, Sacks suggests that he shows a deep concern with history. Sacks affords a view of a foundational moment in Jewish modernity and forwards new ways of thinking about ritual practice, the development of traditions, and the role of religion in society.


  • Ethics and the Problem of Evil / edited by James P. Sterba
    BJ 1401 E757 2017eb

    The problem of evil has been an extremely active area of study in the philosophy of religion for many years. Until now, most sources have focused on logical, metaphysical, and epistemological issues, leaving moral questions as open territory. With the resources of ethical theory firmly in hand, this volume provides lively insight into this ageless philosophical issue.


  • Hegel and Spinoza : Substance and Negativity / Gregor Moder
    B 2949 N4 M6313 2017eb

  • A Short History of German Philosophy / Vittorio Hosle ; Translated by Steven Rendall
    B 2521 H67 2016eb

    This concise but comprehensive book provides an original history of German-language philosophy from the Middle Ages to today. In an accessible narrative that explains complex ideas in clear language, Vittorio Hösle traces the evolution of German philosophy and describes its central influence on other aspects of German culture, including literature, politics, and science.

    Starting with the medieval mystic Meister Eckhart, the book addresses the philosophical changes brought about by Luther's Reformation, and then presents a detailed account of the classical age of German philosophy, including the work of Leibniz and Kant; the rise of a new form of humanities in Lessing, Hamann, Herder, and Schiller; the early Romantics; and the Idealists Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. The following chapters investigate the collapse of the German synthesis in Schopenhauer, Feuerbach, Marx, and Nietzsche. Turning to the twentieth century, the book explores the rise of analytical philosophy in Frege and the Vienna and Berlin circles; the foundation of the historical sciences in Neo-Kantianism and Dilthey; Husserl's phenomenology and its radical alteration by Heidegger; the Nazi philosophers Gehlen and Schmitt; and the main West German philosophers, including Gadamer, Jonas, and those of the two Frankfurt schools. Arguing that there was a distinctive German philosophical tradition from the mid-eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, the book closes by examining why that tradition largely ended in the decades after World War II.

    A philosophical history remarkable for its scope, brevity, and lucidity, this is an invaluable book for students of philosophy and anyone interested in German intellectual and cultural history.


  • What Is Ethically Demanded? : K. E. Løgstrup's Philosophy of Moral Life / edited by Hans Fink and Robert Stern
    BJ 874 L643 W43 2017eb

  • Creaturely Love : How Desire Makes Us More and Less Than Human / Dominic Pettman
    BD 436 P424 2017eb

    To our modern ears the word "creature" has wild, musky, even monstrous, connotations. And yet the terms "creaturely" and "love," taken together, have traditionally been associated with theological debates around the enigmatic affection between God and His key creation, Man. In Creaturely Love , Dominic Pettman explores the ways in which desire makes us both more, and less, human. 

    In an eminently approachable work of wide cultural reach and meticulous scholarship, Pettman undertakes an unprecedented examination of how animals shape the understanding and expression of love between people. Focusing on key figures in modern philosophy, art, and literature (Nietzsche, Salom#65533;, Rilke, Balthus, Musil, Proust), premodern texts and fairy tales (Fourier, Fournival, Ovid), and contemporary films and online phenomena (Wendy and Lucy, Her, memes), Pettman demonstrates that from pet names to spirit animals, and allegories to analogies, animals have constantly appeared in our writings and thoughts about passionate desire.

    By following certain charismatic animals during their passage through the love letters of philosophers, the romances of novelists, the conceits of fables, the epiphanies of poets, the paradoxes of contemporary films, and the digital menageries of the Internet, Creaturely Love ultimately argues that in our utilization of the animal in our amorous expression, we are acknowledging that what we adore in our beloveds is not (only) their humanity, but their creatureliness.


  • Ponderings VII-XI Black Notebooks 1938-€“1939 / Martin Heidegger ; translated by Richard Rojcewicz
    B 3279 H48 S36213 2017eb

    Through these broad and sprawling notebooks, Heidegger offers fascinating opinions on Holderlin, Nietzsche, Wagner, Wittgenstein, Pascal, and many others. The importance of the Black Notebooks transcends Heidegger's relationship with National Socialism. These personal notebooks contain reflections on technology, art, Christianity, the history of philosophy, and Heidegger's attempt to move beyond that history into another beginning.


  • Wagering on an Ironic God : Pascal on Faith and Philosophy / Thomas S. Hibbs
    B 190 H63 2017eb

  • The Weight of Love : Affect, Ecstasy, and Union in the Theology of Bonaventure / Robert Glenn Davis
    B 765 B74 D38 2017eb

  • Philosophy after Friendship : Deleuze's Conceptual Personae / Gregg Lambert
    B 2430 D454 L353 2017eb

  • The Middle Included : Logos in Aristotle / Ömer Aygün
    B 491 L6 A94 2016eb

  • Diogenes of Oinoanda epicureanism and philosophical debates = Diogène d'Œnoanda : épicurisme et controverses / edited by Jürgen Hammerstaedt, Pierre-Marie Morel, Refik Güremen.
    B 557 D564 D566 2017eb

  • Food and Philosophy : Selected Essays / by Spencer K. Wertz
    B 105 F66 W47 2016eb

  • The Banality of Heidegger / Jean-Luc Nancy ; translated by Jeff Fort
    B 3279 H48 S36235313 2016eb

  • Matters of Care : Speculative Ethics in More than Human Worlds / María Puig de la Bellacasa
    BJ 1475 P85 2017eb

    To care can feel good, or it can feel bad. It can do good, it can oppress. But what is care? A moral obligation? A burden? A joy? Is it only human? In Matters of Care , Mar#65533;a Puig de la Bellacasa presents a powerful challenge to conventional notions of care, exploring its significance as an ethical and political obligation for thinking in the more than human worlds of technoscience and naturecultures. 

    Matters of Care contests the view that care is something only humans do, and argues for extending to non-humans the consideration of agencies and communities that make the living web of care by considering how care circulates in the natural world. The first of the book's two parts, "Knowledge Politics," defines the motivations for expanding the ethico-political meanings of care, focusing on discussions in science and technology that engage with sociotechnical assemblages and objects as lively, politically charged "things." The second part, "Speculative Ethics in Antiecological Times," considers everyday ecologies of sustaining and perpetuating life for their potential to transform our entrenched relations to natural worlds as "resources." 

    From the ethics and politics of care to experiential research on care to feminist science and technology studies, Matters of Care is a singular contribution to an emerging interdisciplinary debate that expands agency beyond the human to ask how our understandings of care must shift if we broaden the world.  


  • Radulphus Brito. Quaestiones super Priora Analytica Aristotelis / Radulphus Brito ; edidit Gordon A. Wilson
    B 491 L8 R347 2016eb

  • The Problem of Evil : Selected Readings, Second Edition / edited by Michael L. Peterson
    BJ 1401 P77 2016eb

  • Evolving Enactivism : Basic Minds Meet Content / Daniel D. Hutto and Erik Myin
    BD 418.3 H88 2017eb

    An extended argument that cognitive phenomena--perceiving, imagining, remembering--can be best explained in terms of an interface between contentless and content-involving forms of cognition.

    Evolving Enactivism argues that cognitive phenomena--perceiving, imagining, remembering--can be best explained in terms of an interface between contentless and content-involving forms of cognition. Building on their earlier book Radicalizing Enactivism , which proposes that there can be forms of cognition without content, Daniel Hutto and Erik Myin demonstrate the unique explanatory advantages of recognizing that only some forms of cognition have content while others--the most elementary ones--do not. They offer an account of the mind in duplex terms, proposing a complex vision of mentality in which these basic contentless forms of cognition interact with content-involving ones.

    Hutto and Myin argue that the most basic forms of cognition do not, contrary to a currently popular account of cognition, involve picking up and processing information that is then used, reused, stored, and represented in the brain. Rather, basic cognition is contentless--fundamentally interactive, dynamic, and relational. In advancing the case for a radically enactive account of cognition, Hutto and Myin propose crucial adjustments to our concept of cognition and offer theoretical support for their revolutionary rethinking, emphasizing its capacity to explain basic minds in naturalistic terms. They demonstrate the explanatory power of the duplex vision of cognition, showing how it offers powerful means for understanding quintessential cognitive phenomena without introducing scientifically intractable mysteries into the mix.


  • The Logic of Being : Realism, Truth, and Time / Paul M. Livingston
    BD 331 L588 2017eb

  • All Ears : The Aesthetics of Espionage / Peter Szendy ; translated by Roland Vegső
    BH 301 E77 S94 2017eb

  • Decreation and the Ethical Bind : Simone Weil and the Claim of the Other / Yoon Sook Cha
    B 2430 W474 C539 2017eb

  • The Art of Philosophy : Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment / Susanna Berger
    BH 39 B47 2017eb

    The first book to explore the role of images in philosophical thought and teaching in the early modern period

    Delving into the intersections between artistic images and philosophical knowledge in Europe from the late sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries, The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction. From frontispieces of books to monumental prints created by philosophers in collaboration with renowned artists, Susanna Berger examines visual representations of philosophy and overturns prevailing assumptions about the limited function of the visual in European intellectual history.

    Rather than merely illustrating already existing philosophical concepts, visual images generated new knowledge for both Aristotelian thinkers and anti-Aristotelians, such as Descartes and Hobbes. Printmaking and drawing played a decisive role in discoveries that led to a move away from the authority of Aristotle in the seventeenth century. Berger interprets visual art from printed books, student lecture notebooks, alba amicorum (friendship albums), broadsides, and paintings, and examines the work of such artists as Pietro Testa, Léonard Gaultier, Abraham Bosse, Dürer, and Rembrandt. In particular, she focuses on the rise and decline of the "plural image," a genre that was popular among early modern philosophers. Plural images brought multiple images together on the same page, often in order to visualize systems of logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, or moral philosophy.

    Featuring previously unpublished prints and drawings from the early modern period and lavish gatefolds, The Art of Philosophy reveals the essential connections between visual commentary and philosophical thought.


  • A Mark of the Mental : In Defense of Informational Teleosemantics / Karen Neander
    B 105 I56 N43 2017eb

    Drawing on insights from causal theories of reference, teleosemantics, and state space semantics, a theory of naturalized mental representation.

    In A Mark of the Mental, Karen Neander considers the representational power of mental states--described by the cognitive scientist Zenon Pylyshyn as the "second hardest puzzle" of philosophy of mind (the first being consciousness). The puzzle at the heart of the book is sometimes called "the problem of mental content," "Brentano's problem," or "the problem of intentionality." Its motivating mystery is how neurobiological states can have semantic properties such as meaning or reference. Neander proposes a naturalistic account for sensory-perceptual (nonconceptual) representations.

    Neander draws on insights from state-space semantics (which appeals to relations of second-order similarity between representing and represented domains), causal theories of reference (which claim the reference relation is a causal one), and teleosemantic theories (which claim that semantic norms, at their simplest, depend on functional norms). She proposes and defends an intuitive, theoretically well-motivated but highly controversial thesis: sensory-perceptual systems have the function to produce inner state changes that are the analogs of as well as caused by their referents. Neander shows that the three main elements--functions, causal-information relations, and relations of second-order similarity--complement rather than conflict with each other. After developing an argument for teleosemantics by examining the nature of explanation in the mind and brain sciences, she develops a theory of mental content and defends it against six main content-determinacy challenges to a naturalized semantics.


  • The Insistence of Art : Aesthetic Philosophy after Early Modernity / edited by Paul A. Kottman
    BJ 301 I57 2017eb

  • The Emerging Good in Plato's Philebus / John V. Garner
    B 381 G38 2017eb

  • The Terror of Evidence / Marcus Steinweg ; foreword by Thomas Hirschhorn ; translated by Amanda DeMarco
    B 59 S7413 2017eb

    Meditations, maxims, aphorisms, notes, and comments address topics that range from pathos and genius to careerism and club sandwiches.

    Marcus Steinweg's capacity to implicate the other is beautiful, bright, precise, and logical, grounded in everyday questions, which to him are always big questions.

    --from the foreword by Thomas Hirschhorn

    The houses of philosophy need not be palaces.

    --Marcus Steinweg, "House," The Terror of Evidence

    This is the first book by the prolific German philosopher Marcus Steinweg to be available in English translation. The Terror of Evidence offers meditations, maxims, aphorisms, notes, and comments--191 texts ranging in length from three words to three pages--the deceptive simplicity of which challenges the reader to think. "Thinking means getting lost again and again," Steinweg observes. Reality is the ever-broken promise of consistency; "the terror of evidence" arises from the inconsistency before our eyes. Thinking is a means of coping with that inconsistency.

    Steinweg is known for his collaborations with Thomas Hirschhorn and the lectures and texts he has provided for many of Hirschhorn's projects. This translation of The Terror of Evidence includes a foreword by Hirschhorn written especially for the MIT Press edition.

    The subjects of these short texts vary widely. ("The table of contents is in itself excessive and ambitious," writes Hirschhorn.) They include pathos, passivity, genius, resentment, love, horror, catastrophe, and racism. And club sandwiches (specifically, Foucault's love for this American specialty), blow jobs, and dance. Also: "Two Kinds of Obscurantism," "Putting Words in Spinoza's Mouth," "Note on Rorty," and "Doubting Doubt." The Terror of Evidence can be considered a guidebook to thinking: the daily journey of exploration, the incessant questioning of reality that Steinweg sees as the task of philosophy.


  • Resistance of the Sensible World : An Introduction to Merleau-Ponty / Emmanuel Alloa ; translated by Jane Marie Todd
    B 2430 M3764 A6513 2017eb

  • Jewish Justice : The Contested Limits of Nature, Law, and Covenant / David Novak
    BJ 1285.2 N68 2016eb

  • Mental Language : From Plato to William of Ockham / Claude Panaccio ; translated by Joshua P. Hochschild and Meredith K. Ziebart
    B 105 T54 P3513 2017eb

  • Citizen Subject : Foundations for Philosophical Anthropology / Étienne Balibar ; translated by Steven Miller
    BD 450 B256 2017eb

  • More Than Life : Georg Simmel and Walter Benjamin on Art / Stephane Symons
    B 3329 S64 S96 2017eb

  • Michael Psellos on Literature and Art : A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics / edited by Charles Barber and Stratis Papaioannou
    BH 137 P7413 2017eb

  • Jefferson's Body : A Corporeal Biography / Maurizio Valsania
    B 885 Z7 V345 2017eb

    What did Thomas Jefferson look like? How did he carry himself? Such questions, reasonable to ask as we look back on a person who lived in an era before photography, are the starting point for this boldly original new work. Maurizio Valsania considers all aspects of Jefferson's complex conception of "the body," from eighteenth-century clothing and fashion to manners, adornment, posture, gesture, and visual and material culture. Drawing also from the fields of medical science, psychology, and cultural anthropology, the author conjures a vivid and detailed re-creation of the third president as a living, breathing--and pondering--human being.

    Having situated Jefferson in his own body, Valsania looks at the embodied Jefferson in the world of his fellow humans. Any one of the other people in Jefferson's society--whether that other person was male or female, free or enslaved, African American or Native American--was a critical counterexample for the eighteenth-century Virginian to define himself against, and Valsania's explorations here lead to numerous insightful discoveries about race, gender, and structures of power. The first comprehensive exploration of Jefferson's corporeal world, Jefferson's Body brings the man vividly to life for the modern reader while deepening our understanding of what it meant to Jefferson to be alive.


  • Liquidation World : On the Art of Living Absently / Alexi Kukuljevic
    BD 222 K85 2017eb

    An examination of the disoriented subject of modernity: a dissolute figure who makes an makes an object of its absence; from Baudelaire to Broodthaers.

    In Liquidation World , Alexi Kukuljevic examines a distinctive form of subjectivity animating the avant-garde: that of the darkly humorous and utterly disoriented subject of modernity, a dissolute figure that makes an art of its own vacancy, an object of its absence. Shorn of the truly rotten illusion that the world is a fulfilling and meaningful place, these subjects identify themselves by a paradoxical disidentification--through the objects that take their places. They have mastered the art of living absently, of making something with nothing. Traversing their own morbid obsessions, they substitute the nonsensical for sense, the ridiculous for the meaningful.

    Kukuljevic analyzes a series of artistic practices that illuminate this subjectivity, ranging from Marcel Duchamp's Three Standard Stoppages to Charles Baudelaire's melancholia. He considers the paradox of Duchamp's apparatus in the Stoppages and the strange comedy of Marcel Broodthaers's relation to the readymade; the comic subject in Jacques Vaché and the ridiculous subject in Alfred Jarry; the nihilist in Paul Valéry's Monsieur Teste ; Oswald Wiener's interpretation of the dandy; and Charles Baudelaire as a happy melancholic. Along the way, he also touches on the work of Thomas Bernhard, Andy Kaufman, Buster Keaton, and others. Finally, he offers an extended analysis of Danny's escape from his demented father in Stanley Kubrick's The Shining .

    Each of these subjects is, in Freud's terms, sick--sick in the specific sense that they assume the absence of meaning and the liquidation of value in the world. They concern themselves with art, without assuming its value or meaning. Utterly debased, fundamentally disoriented, they take the void as their medium.


  • The Celebration of Death in Contemporary Culture / Dina Khapaeva
    BD 444 K43 2017eb

  • Cosmopolitanism and Place / edited by Jessica Wahman, Jose M. Medina, and John J. Stuhr
    BJ 1031 C69 2017eb

    Addressing perspectives about who "we" are, the importance of place and home, and the many differences that still separate individuals, this volume reimagines cosmopolitanism in light of our differences, including the different places we all inhabit and the many places where we do not feel at home. Beginning with the two-part recognition that the world is a smaller place and that it is indeed many worlds, Cosmopolitanism and Place critically explores what it means to assert that all people are citizens of the world, everywhere in the world, as well as persons bounded by a universal and shared morality.


  • Honneth and everyday intercultural (mis)recognition : work, marginalisation and integration
    B809.3

  • Landscape and Power in Geographical Space as a Social-Aesthetic Construct / Olaf Kühne
    BH301.L3

  • Truth in fiction : rethinking its logic : the Istanbul lectures / John Woods
    BC199.F5

  • Method, substance and the future of African philosophy / Edwin E. Etieyibo, editor
    B5305

  • Dividuations. Theories of participation / michaela Ott
    B790-5739

  • Ted Honderich on consciousness, determinism, and humanity / Gregg D. Caruso, editor
    B105.D47

  • Jaakko Hintikka on knowledge and game-theoretical semantics / Hans van Ditmarsch, Gabriel Sandu, editors
    B4715.H54

  • Søren Kierkegaard : educating for authenticity / Søren Harnow Klausen
    B4378.I76

  • Essentially speaking : feminism, nature & difference / Diana Fuss
    BD 450 F87 1989
    In this brief and powerful book, Diana Fuss takes on the debate of pure essence versus social construct, engaging with the work of Luce Irigaray and Monique Wittig, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Houston Baker, and with the politics of gay identity.
page last updated on: Saturday 26 May 2018
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