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Psychology - Concordia University Libraries Recent Acquisitions

Titles in the call number range BF (Psychology) that were added to the Concordia University Libraries collection in the last 60 days.


  • A community of witches : contemporary neo-paganism and witchcraft in the United States / Helen A. Berger
    BF 1573 B47 1999
    Explores the beliefs and practices of neo-paganism and witchcraft, more generally known as Wicca. Imported to the US from the UK in the late 1960s, this study shows how it absorbed the social concerns of the time, such as feminism, environmentalism and a mistrust of authority.

  • Play, dreams and imitation in childhood / Jean Piaget ; [translated by C. Gattegno and F.M. Hodgson]
    BF 721 P452 1999eb
    First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

  • Handbook of Accessible Instruction and Testing Practices Issues, Innovations, and Applications / edited by Stephen N. Elliott, Ryan J. Kettler, Peter A. Beddow, Alexander Kurz
    BF721-723

  • Social-Emotional Prevention Programs for Preschool Children's Behavior Problems A Multi-level Efficacy Assessment of Classroom, Risk Group, and Individual Level / by Catrinel Alice ┼×tefan
    BF721-723

  • Social justice, multicultural counseling, and practice : beyond a conventional approach / Heesoon Jun
    BF636.7.C76

  • The future / Nick Montfort
    BF 327 M66 2017eb

    How the future has been imagined and made, through the work of writers, artists, inventors, and designers.

    The future is like an unwritten book. It is not something we see in a crystal ball, or can only hope to predict, like the weather. In this volume of the MIT Press's Essential Knowledge series, Nick Montfort argues that the future is something to be made, not predicted. Montfort offers what he considers essential knowledge about the future, as seen in the work of writers, artists, inventors, and designers (mainly in Western culture) who developed and described the core components of the futures they envisioned. Montfort's approach is not that of futurology or scenario planning; instead, he reports on the work of making the future--the thinkers who devoted themselves to writing pages in the unwritten book. Douglas Engelbart, Alan Kay, and Ted Nelson didn't predict the future of computing, for instance. They were three of the people who made it.

    Montfort focuses on how the development of technologies--with an emphasis on digital technologies--has been bound up with ideas about the future. Readers learn about kitchens of the future and the vision behind them; literary utopias, from Plato's Republic to Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland; the Futurama exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair; and what led up to Tim Berners-Lee's invention of the World Wide Web. Montfort describes the notebook computer as a human-centered alterative to the idea of the computer as a room-sized "giant brain"; speculative practice in design and science fiction; and, throughout, the best ways to imagine and build the future.


  • Seven ways of looking at pointless suffering : what philosophy can tell us about the hardest mystery of all / Scott Samuelson
    BF 789 S8 S265 2018
    It's right there in the Book of Job: "Man is born unto trouble as the sparks fly upward." Suffering is an inescapable part of the human condition--which leads to a question that has proved just as inescapable throughout the centuries: Why? Why do we suffer? Why do people die young? Is there any point to our pain, physical or emotional? Do horrors like hurricanes have meaning?

    In Seven Ways of Looking at Pointless Suffering , Scott Samuelson tackles that hardest question of all. To do so, he travels through the history of philosophy and religion, but he also attends closely to the real world we live in. While always taking the question of suffering seriously, Samuelson is just as likely to draw lessons from Bugs Bunny as from Confucius, from his time teaching philosophy to prisoners as from Hannah Arendt's attempts to come to terms with the Holocaust. He guides us through the arguments people have offered to answer this fundamental question, explores the many ways that we have tried to minimize or eliminate suffering, and examines people's attempts to find ways to live with pointless suffering. Ultimately, Samuelson shows, to be fully human means to acknowledge a mysterious paradox: we must simultaneously accept suffering and oppose it. And understanding that is itself a step towards acceptance.

    Wholly accessible, and thoroughly thought-provoking, Seven Ways of Looking at Pointless Suffering is a masterpiece of philosophy, returning the field to its roots--helping us see new ways to understand, explain, and live in our world, fully alive to both its light and its darkness.

  • Our minds, our selves : a brief history of psychology / Keith Oatley
    BF 81 O24 2018

    An original history of psychology told through the stories of its most important breakthroughs and the people who made them

    Advances in psychology have revolutionized our understanding of the human mind. Imaging technology allows researchers to monitor brain activity, letting us see what happens when we perceive, think, and feel. But technology is only part of how ideas about the mind and brain have developed over the past century and a half. In Our Minds, Our Selves , distinguished psychologist and writer Keith Oatley provides an engaging, original, and authoritative history of modern psychology told through the stories of its most important breakthroughs and the men and women who made them.

    Our Minds, Our Selves traverses a fascinating terrain: forms of conscious and unconscious knowledge; brain physiology; emotion; stages of mental development from infancy to adulthood; language acquisition and use; the nature of memory; mental illness; morality; free will; creativity; the mind at work in art and literature; and, most important, our ability to cooperate with one another. Controversial experiments--such as Stanley Milgram's investigation of our willingness to obey authority and inflict pain and Philip Zimbardo and his colleagues' study of behavior in a simulated prison--are covered in detail. Biographical sketches illuminate the thinkers behind key insights and turning points: historical figures such as Hermann Helmholtz, Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget, B. F. Skinner, and Alan Turing; leading contemporaries such as Geoffrey Hinton, Michael Tomasello, and Tania Singer; and influential people from other fields, including Margaret Mead, Noam Chomsky, Jane Goodall, and Gabrielle Starr.

    Enhancing our understanding of ourselves and others, psychology holds the potential to create a better world. Our Minds, Our Selves tells the story of this most important of sciences in a new and appealing way.


  • The ascent of affect : genealogy and critique / Ruth Leys
    BF 531 L465 2017
    In recent years, emotions have become a major, vibrant topic of research not merely in the biological and psychological sciences but throughout a wide swath of the humanities and social sciences as well. Yet, surprisingly, there is still no consensus on their basic nature or workings.

    Ruth Leys's brilliant, much anticipated history, therefore, is a story of controversy and disagreement. The Ascent of Affect focuses on the post-World War II period, when interest in emotions as an object of study began to revive. Leys analyzes the ongoing debate over how to understand emotions, paying particular attention to the continual conflict between camps that argue for the intentionality or meaning of emotions but have trouble explaining their presence in non-human animals and those that argue for the universality of emotions but struggle when the question turns to meaning. Addressing the work of key figures from across the spectrum, considering the potentially misleading appeal of neuroscience for those working in the humanities, and bringing her story fully up to date by taking in the latest debates, Leys presents here the most thorough analysis available of how we have tried to think about how we feel.

  • Decision research : a field guide / John S. Carroll, Eric J. Johnson
    BF 448 C37 1990
page last updated on: Wednesday 18 July 2018
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